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Registry Defragmentation 9.1 Giveaway
$11.95
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Giveaway of the day — Registry Defragmentation 9.1

Registry Defragmentation is a small utility that does gigantic improvements in computer performance.
$11.95 EXPIRED
User rating: 289 (29%) 714 (71%) 85 comments

Registry Defragmentation 9.1 was available as a giveaway on August 25, 2009!

Today Giveaway of the Day
$19.99
free today
DupHunter enables new smart ways of finding duplicate images.

Registry Defragmentation is a small utility that does gigantic improvements in computer performance. This application physically defragments the Windows registry file to give it the proper linear structure. This is an absolutely essential tool for all folks who install/uninstall new software applications frequently.

"Registry Defragmentation" performs physical defragmentation of the Windows registry file. After defragmentation your registry will acquire linear structure which will reduce application response time and registry access time. "Registry Defragmentation" also removes unused entries, thus making registry even smaller in size. Do not worry if sometimes after defragmentation the registry will become smaller only by 1-5%, the key is not in size but in its linear structure, hence it determines access time.

System Requirements:

Windows 95/98/ME/NT/2000/XP/2003 and Vista

Publisher:

Elcor Software

Homepage:

http://www.elcor.net/rdefrag.php

File Size:

3.37 MB

Price:

$11.95

Comments on Registry Defragmentation 9.1

85 comments
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@59 (me): typo: exit should be edit.

@29: Revo Uninstaller offered to delete my entire HKLM branch.

Reply   |   Comment by Caleb  –  6 years ago
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#61,64,67,70, mike, as you noted, ERUNT really isn't safe on Vista/Win7 due to near-constant registry updates. System Restore is specifically designed to only restore certain things. There isn't anything even remotely like GoBack anymore, but there are some things which can be used when trying out software, like Windows SteadyState, Returnil, Acronis True Image Try&Decide, etc. (each has its good points and bad points). Something which offers a very small subset of GoBack functionality is Acronis Nonstop Backup (every five minutes) in Acronis True Image Home 2010.

Reply   |   Comment by Fubar  –  6 years ago
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#43 the PE executable format includes a section in the header that normally holds a short text message stating the the program requires windows (of any description) to operate can contains a full DOS mode application that is run when the program is run in true DOS mode like when booted from a recovery diskette.

Compatability with all windows microsoft operating systems including DOS is not a sign of outdated software but a decent developer that programs cleanly and does not use unsupported hacks to get the job done. All it means for this type of application is it understands the 3 types of registry hive formats used by the different classes of windows and has been programmed what to do with them.

Avoid applications that manipulate system settings and yet do not have proper compatability with the operating system YOU use and you will avoid many problems.

Reply   |   Comment by TK  –  6 years ago
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I think this software does not received fair comments. I tried on it with XP, and I believe it does improved the start up performance time.

Reply   |   Comment by jugem  –  6 years ago
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I have used Elcor's Advanced Registry Doctor and Premium Booster, thanks to GAOTD, and still use them until this time. Either app has not crippled my computer, rather it has ensured the integrity of the registry.

I use both alongside tune up utilities 2008, ccleaner, atf cleaner, and quicksys regcleaner 2009 and has so far not met anything I find unusual or alarming. I noted the comments of others on use of registry cleaners and have always kept them in mind.

After successfully installing and using it on XP SP3 I say this giveaway is a keeper! This registry cleaner looks very much like a product spun off the Advanced Registry Doctor Pro more than the Premium Booster and it has sped up my computer to a certain degree. My desk top is a six year old clone but it has more than 100 software apps, again, courtesy mostly of GAOTD. Download now while you still can!

Reply   |   Comment by LEO O FORTUGALEZA  –  6 years ago
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I tried it on my system and it reduced the registry about 20%. But I didn't really notice any performance difference. I tend to keep the registry fairly clean as it is, even manually cleaning the registry sometimes. I suspect that for those who regularly maintain their systems it won't have any noticeable effect. Any noticeable performance improvement likely comes from cleaning the registry, not from defragmenting it.

Reply   |   Comment by Patrick McNamara  –  6 years ago
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I see 3 other programs that were given away here in "Other titles" section (Premium Booster, Advanced Registry Doctor Pro & TweakRAM).
I think TweakRAM is the only one more or less useful program from this company. All others were complete bloatware.
I will not risk damaging my registry with this program so I will pass today.

Reply   |   Comment by DDS  –  6 years ago
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Too many people are confusing this with a Registry Cleaner. Registry cleaners deletes files (these can ruin your computer), Registry defrag rearranges your files to give you better performance.

Reply   |   Comment by Farnsworth  –  6 years ago
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73 --- It is free... you missed a step somewhere ... I did not install it but you have to read the "readme" file... Don't run from a zip file. Unzip first... then READ the instructions.. If you run Vista... run the setup and if there is an activate that too as Administartor. Sometimes Setup is first... other times activate is first. Sometimes there is no activate... sometimes you have to register to get a serial .. it comes in a minute or less for me. Thje point is READ>.. software here is free and licensed.

Reply   |   Comment by MrLatin  –  6 years ago
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I use only Auslogics ... to defrag the drive... I don't do registry... I defrag about twice a year. You want to backup with something like Ghost. A true backup will only be reliable if done while your system is not booted... meaning you have to boot from a CD or DVD. That's gospel.

Reply   |   Comment by MrLatin  –  6 years ago
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ohhh man this program is sooooooooooooooooooooooo boring , yawnzz. use caution well proceeding to download it. good night

Reply   |   Comment by western  –  6 years ago
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Firstly I want to point out that this is a registry defragmenter, which makes it very different to a registry cleaner.

It does not search for and remove "invalid" registry entries from the registry, which on occasion can be disasterous if a registry cleaner mistakenly thinks a valid registry entry is an error and removes it.
Rather, this simply creates a new copy of the registry with any empty space removed.

Also note that "defragging" the registry like this can not be done by Windows itself of disk deframenters.

Reply   |   Comment by Roger  –  6 years ago
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Is this supposed to be the freebie of the day?
I downloaded it, installed it, ran it. It found some problems, I clicked continue to fix, it wouldn't go further without $39.95.
Next step, I will uninstall it.
Why did I bother? I thought I got to try it free.

Reply   |   Comment by Laura  –  6 years ago
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@60.

Do you have a 100mb hidden system partition ? That may be what is causing the problem.

I don't allow 7 to cretae that , and on my multiboot system - the program worked very well.

I agree - it would be useful to include a restore function for the backed up hives - a simple batch file that can be run from system recovery command prompt, and something via the GUI would be handy additions.

Reply   |   Comment by SIW2  –  6 years ago
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I have found Tuneup Utilities to do the same things as these software. In fact, all the features of these software are bundled into this software. I really like this software very much and would recommend it to everyone.

Reply   |   Comment by Neeraj's Software Discussion  –  6 years ago
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#1: "Registry backup files are not self-executing (you must have a program that supports the backup format to restore your registry)."

I *think* that this might be a fairly easy improvement for the developer to add, if they're watching. If I'm correct they store the files making up the registry intact, so all it would take is a batch sort of program to copy them back. I'm guessing it wouldn't take a Linux person long to put together a small boot image that would run off floppy, USB, or CD, & then show a GRUB menu with a batch copy script. Most DOS won't read NTFS so that route's out.

* * *

#9: "Any utility which modifies the registry as a whole while Windows is running is going to mess stuff up, whether you notice it or not. Such utilities, if used, must be run prior to Windows boot, which Registry Defragmentation 9.1 doesn’t do."

Strictly FWIW, Fubar, I *think* Registry Defragmentation tries to more-or-less mimic NTREGOPT, reading a snapshot of the registry, writing that data into copies of the separate reg files. Then on re-boot the originals are re-named & the new files copied into place. Now this part is really iffy -- a blatant guess -- but judging from the time it takes to process the registry, I don't *think* any data or contents is being altered... the reason I say it's iffy is Registry Defragmentation does not properly read the win7 64 registry (maybe not any 64 bit registry), shown by the small backup "Software" file sizes compared to ERUNT's, so it could be parsing the registry so fast because it's not reading a great deal of it.

"Some people are big fans of registry backups."

Again, FWIW... Install programs often muck things up in the registry pretty good, as does the occasional piece of software, & we all know about developer claims. XP Pro 32 is a great test environ in that I can backup the registry with ERUNT, fire up RegShot or Installwatch, & then see just what installation & running an app do. If I don't like it, I can put things back very close to exactly as they were without resorting to restoring a full partition from backup. Often I add the critical reg entries back in so an app will run without all the changes installation causes. Never a problem (knock wood) sometimes restoring an ERUNT backup several times a day. BUT I'd be a fool to try that in Vista or 7! There an ERUNT backup is generally very short-lived, but there Restore works also. ;-)

* * *

#29: "Nor is it clear why, after all those successive builds, this software continues to be entirely incapable of reporting on the ’state’ of the Registry before it even gets to work on it."

A *Guess*: I tried Registry Clean Expert's defragger for whatever reason several months ago... Checking the state of fragmentation took longer than the defrag. Based on that experience, checking the amount of fragmentation 1st was a total waste -- faster to just do it & then see if I needed it. [I've no idea if all reg defraggers behave that way.]

* * *

#36: "there is no need to mess with the Registry at all. (1) The space taken is minute (2) If you can measure the speed differential I would like to know what method is used."

If the Registry's in good shape, then yeah -- I mean I got 500 kb last time I used NTREGOPT just to make sure it worked in 7 64. OTOH I've had my XP Pro SP3 32 Registry dropped by almost 1/3 in the past, after a severe bout of install problems, & *that* made a very obvious difference I could easily see.

* * *

#37: "I Agree with #31 and highly recommend Mark Russinovich PageDefrag."

That only does the physical files... it does not do the innards. Mark says this himself.

* * *

#44: "When windows is running, much of the often-used information in the registry is loaded into RAM ... RAM memory access doesn’t care how the data is arranged. Access time is the same whether the data is fragmented or not. Defragmenting the registry may slightly shorten the initial load time, but carries substantial risk if anything goes wrong."

FWIW, there is some debate on fragmented memory -- personally I'm agnostic but there are folks who say it makes a difference, whether you're talking system RAM or flash. At any rate, a fresh Registry backup with ERUNT limits risk to the time it takes to reboot basically, & worse case you'll need an install disk to get a command prompt. Each should decide for themselves, but I don't consider that excessive risk by any means. :-)

* * *

#46: well said IMHO. :-)

Reply   |   Comment by mike  –  6 years ago
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This program works on Vista 64 and 7 64 bit.

It offers 3 things;

1. Create a restore point. Under System backup>configuration, it also allows various adjustments to System restore - e.g. change the disk space allocated to shadow copy storage. (I only tried that function of the options on offer here)

2. Make a registry Backup. It makes backup copies of the registry hives. This is not a proprietary format and is the best way to back up the registry.

3. Compact the registry. I tested it on Vista SP2 x64 and 7 x64.

In addition it does not offer checkboxes next to the Hives that do not need compacting.

It worked perfectly.

Reply   |   Comment by SIW2  –  6 years ago
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**WARNING** **WARNING** **WARNING**
Just had to do a re-install of windows xp home sp2
cause of a totally corrupted registry. PC would not boot.
Be careful.

Reply   |   Comment by hermon  –  6 years ago
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#47: "Of course, editing your Registry on your own is like performing an Appendicitis on yourself! And, using little-known Registry Editors is like getting it removed by a Quack :)"

With all respect, folks have been editing the registry using Windows' built-in Regedit since win95 debuted, & for the most part without problems. If it scares you, fine -- don't do it -- but it's so commonplace that Microsoft has been including Registry editing in their bulletins, knowledge base, & advisories to users for years.

* * *

#52: "THIS PROGRAM MESSES UP VISTA64 It took another installation to fix."

Why we all should have current backups, & why having some sort of repair strategy in place can help. While I realize it doesn't do you any good right now Nicole, restoring an ERUNT backup, or a full one wouldn't have been nearly as painful... after a fresh install is an ideal time to make one of both.

* * *

#55: "Nearly useless as are all other registry defraggers. Show me one piece of research that indicates these thinggs have a useful effect – go on – google away – there is no such evidence!"

Well, since you asked:
[http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/sysinternals/bb897426.aspx] is written by Mark Russinovich, who has a tremendous rep, & says: "Paging and Registry file fragmentation can be one of the leading causes of performance degradation related to file fragmentation in a system."

* * *

#57: "windows slow ass defragger can do the job just fine."

Actually, & respectfully, not really. Windows can't defrag the files it's using, plus it doesn't do a thing for the actual content.

* * *

#58: " I find I have a Vista installation that has its Reliability Monitoring function made inoperative."

After backup try a repair re-install?

"it seems to me that an intelligent solution would be to build a large database of what registry entries should be, and to add them when found missing."

Nice thought, but there is no such universal groups of settings. The closest you can come AFAIK is if you have a bunch of identical PCs, all with identical software, you can clone / share parts of the registry.

* * *

#59: " I do not allow programs to edit it for me ... as someone who edits the registry on a regular basis, I think I will pass."

FWIW editing does not defrag & defrag I don't think should edit. 2 separate things.

Reply   |   Comment by mike  –  6 years ago
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Registry cleaner is almost as useless – cleaning a few hundred lines of code in a registry is like sweeping one car parking space in a carpark the size of Montana – but more use than a registry defragger.


I agree. Only difficulty is 99.999% of people in the USA have no idea how big or small Montanna is, nor could they point to it on a map. Even the president of the USA needed help origianlly to find Iraq (at first pointed vaguely to Manchuria).

Reply   |   Comment by dog  –  6 years ago
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hi this seems to be a desent program it works reletivly quick and does speed up system but as with timir i would probably prefer a well know regictry cleaner


...you have done scientific research to back up your prolamation that it "does speed up the system." Ok then by how much 10%, 15%, 22.36189? Surely you must have this information available to back up your assertion. "Well it seems to be faster?" doesn't count, sorry.

Reply   |   Comment by dog  –  6 years ago
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With all due respect & all that, and of course in hopes that's it's useful...

The Windows' Registry has been around since win95, when it replaced the Awful, Terrible, Nasty, & otherwise screwed up .ini files you dealt with in earlier versions of Windows. The registry system is far from perfect -- very far -- but it's what we've got, so Oh Well, Buck Up, & all of those cliches. ;-)

So-called Registry Cleaning &/or optimization has been debated before here & on-line, but today is sort of irrelevant because that's not what Registry Defragmentation does. There are 2 different ways to defrag the Registry, with both different focus & results. There's the regular file defrag which is the same as defragging any files on your hard drive(s). Then there's content defragging, which is *sort of* like converting this page to text, then eliminating the white space, though some software may try to go further & actually move contents around. NTREGOPT comes with ERUNT & simply re-writes the Registry -- it reads the Registry & writes the keys/values to a separate file, so conveniently everything is written as it should be, without fragmentation. Then it copies those files into place during re-boot, so hopefully on a defragged hard drive the Registry's physical files aren't fragmented either.

The biggest question of course is: "Why"? Welllll... It's faster to read a non-fragmented file. Reading a smaller file also takes less time than a larger one. When you fire up Windows, the registry is just a collection of files on your hard drive that have to be read. Parts of it will be always be stored in memory until you reboot, & other parts not, but there's no denying that at some time or other the Registry files have to be read. How much of a difference defragging your Registry will make depends on how bad it is beforehand -- decreasing the total Registry file size by less than a MB is going to increase speed somewhere, but have fun trying to measure it. ;-)

The Registry itself is rather simple to navigate & work with. It's hard in most cases to *really* screw up as long as you use reasonable care, exporting any keys *Before* you change them, & *After* an ERUNT backup. The Registry is constantly being read & written to -- something you can easily see for yourself running the free Process Monitor from Microsoft's System Internals folks. There's nothing to install, & it won't change anything so if you're curious go ahead & give it a try.

Now, while there are all these constant changes, unless you're changing a program setting, or adding/removing an app, they don't really mean a thing -- they're just housekeeping. Restoring a static snapshot taken at any point in time doesn't have any drastic effects, as long as you haven't changed any software settings (including Windows), or added/removed software... if you have, all that happens is those changes obviously aren't included. That's the most common reason for using ERUNT in the 1st place -- to put things back for example after a software trial.

I talk about ERUNT (& the bundled NTREGOPT), which is an older app that takes a snapshot of the running registry & stores it. Why use ERUNT -- because you don't need Windows to restore a registry backup. What about Windows' Restore -- 1st you need to at least be able to start Windows, if only in Safe Mode, & 2nd, in XP System Restore DOES NOT erase all changes... in XP (& to a lesser extent Vista & 7) System Restore doesn't put the Registry back *exactly*, and even tells you right out that your new documents have been saved. New Documents does not just mean new doc files to Windows, but can mean several types of new files, folders, & yes, registry entries.

Reply   |   Comment by mike  –  6 years ago
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I took advantage of offer #41 for speed up my pc 2009 from Uniblue and noticed quite noticeable new zest both online and off. Give it a go.

Start ;url at "download not // before it.

Reply   |   Comment by Will Ambrose  –  6 years ago
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Vit Registry Fix is a modern looking program that has a lot of tools-registry cleaner, registry defrag, disk cleanup, startup manager and of course full registry backup as well. It "fixes" the registry for free. Its like NTregopt and ERUNT and a really good registry cleaner, disk cleaner, startup manager all in ONE small program. Its a gem. I don't need anything else or multiple tools anymore.

Reply   |   Comment by umak  –  6 years ago
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Registry Defragmentation 9.1 is NOT compatible with win7 64 RC. With a full backup on a multi-boot system [i.e. plenty of options to put things back] I gave it a shot since many reg tools that work OK in Vista don't make the grade, at all, in win7... I'm actively looking for replacements / options. Good news is I confirmed ERUNT still works in win7 64, & restores a reg backup just fine outside of win7 using either CLI or GUI. I needed/wanted to confirm that anyway, which was a good thing because win7 wouldn't start after running a defrag using today's GOTD.

That doesn't mean that Registry Defragmentation is a bad program or anything of the sort -- just that it doesn't work with win7 64 RC so far. Registry Defragmentation is actually a set of small, lightweight apps mainly to backup & defrag Windows' registry... there's a separate app to backup, defrag, schedule, map, & one named SysBackup that if I read the help file correctly, creates a restore point for you. RegToolkit.exe is the main GUI where you launch the individual apps. Aside from not working in win7 [which they can hardly be blamed for, not claiming support in the 1st place] the only downside I found was it seemed a bit confusing the way you use a dropdown menu in a message window to choose whether you want to backup or restore. The only real improvement I'd suggest is the addition of some sort of emergency restore procedure if/when Windows won't boot.

FWIW... Restoring an ERUNT registry backup works a few ways -- tried 2 just to make sure it works in win7 before I really needed it some day. ERUNT copies your existing registry files as is, though the names are different to prevent problems with Windows. Worst case, as long as you can access the disk, you can copy [overwrite] the ERUNT backed up reg files from where they're stored to where they belong. ERUNT creates an inf file that's stored with the backups -- since win7 likes to re-letter hard drive partitions, in XP I had to edit the inf file to put stuff back on the right drive. To use the GUI in XP all I had to do was double click ERDNT.exe in the same folder as today's backup. To use the CLI, just opened a DOS box in XP & typed ERDNT sysreg. Full directions are in ERUNT's Readme.txt file.

Reply   |   Comment by mike  –  6 years ago
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Freeware WinASO Registry Optimizer (includes registry defrag), 5 star in my opinion: http://www.winaso.com/

Reply   |   Comment by jonas  –  6 years ago
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I will pass on this one. I am the only one who will edit the registry on my computer. I do not allow programs to edit it for me unless it tells me exactly what it is doing and I approve all of the keys, subkeys, and values that it is editing. (Just so I don't look stupid saying that I don't allow programs to edit the registry, the one exception to that is when installing programs, they are allowed to exit the registry.)

So, I think that this will be useful to the person who is relunctant to edit the registry, but as someone who edits the registry on a regular basis, I think I will pass.

Reply   |   Comment by Caleb  –  6 years ago
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I note the warnings to use a registry defragger/cleaner/scourer with great caution, however, I would be interested to find a registry management program that adds registry entries.

For my sins, after running multifarious reg clean programs, I find I have a Vista installation that has its Reliability Monitoring function made inoperative. While I thought I had had the 'cleaners' save their work, for later reversal, it hasn't turned out that way.

And, as well, I've lost a user - one of the machine's admins can no longer log in. :(

So, it seems to me that an intelligent solution would be to build a large database of what registry entries should be, and to add them when found missing. That'd make you a million or two.

Why? "We do these things not because they are easy, but because they are hard..!" (JFK) :)

Reply   |   Comment by Phaedron  –  6 years ago
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as others have said, this program is useless. windows slow ass defragger can do the job just fine. there is no real reason to download this bloatware.

Reply   |   Comment by muffin  –  6 years ago
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What I don’t like is no Analyse option to report the current state of fragmentation of the registry hives to determine if a full “defragmentation” is even warrented. One has to choose Defragmentation or nothing. I am concerned over the term “also removes unused entries” A defragmenter should not touch the format of any entries in the registry, it should just defragment it and remove the fragmented space left by previously deleted or shortened entries and that is all. The description implies it is also a registry cleaner too and I certainly don’t want to trust a programatic registry cleaner when most will change settings that are there for a good reason as well as stuff left behind by lazy developers.

Reply   |   Comment by MR Tarachand  –  6 years ago
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Snake oil
Nearly useless as are all other registry defraggers.
Show me one piece of research that indicates these thinggs have a useful effect - go on - google away - there is no such evidence!
Registry cleaner is almost as useless - cleaning a few hundred lines of code in a registry is like sweeping one car parking space in a carpark the size of Montana - but more use than a registry defragger.
More risk than its worth - and that is nothing.
Relax - your registry is fine - leave it alone!

Reply   |   Comment by CharlesKane  –  6 years ago
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Folks there are alot of these programs out there. Be very carefull with what you use. The effects may not show up right away!
Try your best registry defrag/cleaner, then use another one...You will still see that it has something to fix or adjust.
As for Glary Utils, I don't trust ones that do not respond to emails. Theyre there just to throw out their products and not support them. Glary for one, I have not got their util to fix broken short cuts, at least when i last tried.

Reply   |   Comment by Dan  –  6 years ago
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There have been many of these offered here and other places free and for money, So far I can’t find any that are any better than what is already in your operating system.

I have found ;that most of these do more dammage than they ever have done any good. These programs will delete items that you need if you are not extreemely careful.

I tried so many of these and recomend none of them.

Reply   |   Comment by Neil Tarachand  –  6 years ago
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PANIC STATIONS..downloaded and setup no problem, even got so far as to register it. THIS PROGRAM MESSES UP VISTA64 It took another installation to fix. DO NOT use this with VISTA64

Reply   |   Comment by Nicole Schaeffer  –  6 years ago
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I found this program really useful. Installed quickly, and defragged without a problem. It reduced the size of the registry by 25%, and after reboot (which was actually quicker this time), every program loaded up a bit faster. So, thumbs up!

Reply   |   Comment by Nilesh Tarachand  –  6 years ago
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Registry cleaners... yeah.... I ONCE used a major brand...e-mailed them on a working system when MY system crashed. Their response?... "We can't help it if you don't know how to use it" Essentially, it was .. too bad, you tried it. Lou.

Reply   |   Comment by Lou  –  6 years ago
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Thanks you Happy Person and fubar for the advice on yesterdays offering. Unfortunately, I didn't see it until today.
Thanks anyway.

Reply   |   Comment by john  –  6 years ago
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BOTTOM LINE: Terrible experience. Program is baulky, locked twice early in the defragmentation process. Unpacking the .zip was a multi-attempt effort....never had that experience before.

I've owned & use Registry Healer for many years. It's a far superior product, complete with automatic registry backup.

Reply   |   Comment by William Josephson  –  6 years ago
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Registry Defragmentation gives the BEST boost to your PC's speed, in our experience! We believe that a Registry Repair/ Defragger/ Optimizer is an essential tool and that it is worth the money spent!

Of course, editing your Registry on your own is like performing an Appendicitis on yourself! And, using little-known Registry Editors is like getting it removed by a Quack :)

Read about the Windows Registry at http://www.welloiledpc.com/registry.htm.

Our favorite Windows Registry program is Elcor Software's PremiumBooster - it works with Windows 7 as well and gives us great results each time. For Windows XP, our choice Registry Defragger is Norton System Works - we have used NSW right from the DOS days and never once has it failed us!

Reply   |   Comment by WellOiledPC  –  6 years ago
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The "problems" of the Registry, are those of any database... defunct entries, slack space left by deletions.

The old, OLD way to internally defrag the registry was to perform a full extraction and a full rebuild, and even that had some dodgy areas due to defect in the DOS mode regedit.

If you have frequent additions and removals, installing and removing trials, then your registry will be in a much "dirtier" state than if you have changed very little.

"Cleaning" is the process of removing junk entries, but is susceptible to mistakes in identifying the "junk".

"Compacting" (or registry defragmenting) is the closing up of waste space (a database compaction) - nothing is actually removed in this step, though there is a possible loss of synchronization because of changes made to the active registry during or after the compact.

Sysinternals Pagedefrag, and SOME commercial defragmenters in "offline" mode, can externally defragment the registry files so that all the disk clusters are contiguous - if you clean or defrag the registry by any other method, then it makes sense to follow up by defragmenting the final file.

Reply   |   Comment by The Leecher  –  6 years ago
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Just a small point of note ERUNT and NTRegOPT are not SysInternal tools. They are written by Lars Hederer.

Reply   |   Comment by anonymous  –  6 years ago
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There's another reason why defragmenting the internal structure of the registry is not be very important or provide an expected large speed increase. When windows is running, much of the often-used information in the registry is loaded into RAM for ready access by Windows and programs. RAM memory access doesn't care how the data is arranged. Access time is the same whether the data is fragmented or not. Defragmenting the registry may slightly shorten the initial load time, but carries substantial risk if anything goes wrong.

Reply   |   Comment by Richard  –  6 years ago
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I try to stay away from Software that includes any DOS Platform Operating System such as Windows 98SE and Windows 95 as I'm running Windows XP which is built on an all new Platform. However with all the negative responses on today's Giveaway I'll past on this offer as I'm already using Tune Up Utilities for it's Ratings. As always Thanks anyway.

Reply   |   Comment by DJ High Tek  –  6 years ago
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Premium Booster (a previous giveawayoftheday from Elcore) performs this function and without a re-boot. CCCleaner has a registry cleaner but no defragger. Glary Utilities has a registry defragger that I trust and have used on occasion. IT analizes, tells you how much the registry will change, gives the yes/no option and if you opt to defrag, it does so and re-boots. Iobit's Advanced System Care has a registry defragger in the Utilities Tune-up section. Use any at your own risk!

Reply   |   Comment by magiccrpet  –  6 years ago
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HI all!!

To be honest I found this tool pretty decent but it's definetely not worth downloading!!

So THUMBS DOWN for me!!


To remove unused registry entries my favourite application is the FREEWARE "EASY CLEANER 2.0", a little great tool designed to remove irrelevant registry entries, fragmented files on the hard disk, duplicate files, unnecessary processes in the startup etc...

http://www.softpedia.com/reviews/windows/EasyCleaner-Review-34741.shtml


As you can see from the above link it got an "EXCELLENT" rating from SOFTPEDIA EDITOR in all its key aspects such as User Interface, Features, Ease of use and Pricing/Value.

Enjoy!!



Cheers from Italy!!


Giovanni

Reply   |   Comment by giovanni (King of Freebies...LOL!)  –  6 years ago
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Okay, I'm sorry I asked if it ran on Windows 7 (post #4), it's just that it claims it runs on Vista and the two OS's are quite similar, so I was hoping somebody would know for sure. I know I probably looked like a jack ass who didn't read the website. Next time I'll add a bit more information before asking questions.

Reply   |   Comment by Wes  –  6 years ago
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As a computer tech I used to use 3rd party software until I met a computer genius who taught me the proper way to deal with pc's. I put him to the test with ccleaner and found that he got rid of more junk than the software did. These registry cleaners cannot know the many thousands of registry keys and values. Even Microsoft doesnt know them all so why use software to do it? All it does anyway is to get rid of empty values. If you want to defrag something do your hard drive.

Reply   |   Comment by den armstrong  –  6 years ago
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I agree with Fubar, "Let sleeping dogs lie".
I was writing VB programs, back when MS used INI files.
Then MS introduced the Registry.
My programs still save all their settings in INI files.

Reply   |   Comment by Rob  –  6 years ago
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I Agree with #31 and highly recommend Mark Russinovich PageDefrag.
"PageDefrag uses advanced techniques to provide you what commercial defragmenters cannot: the ability for you to see how fragmented your paging files and Registry hives are, and to defragment them. In addition, it defragments event log files and Windows 2000/XP hibernation files" (defragmentation is done at boot time).
It's free, available directly from Microsoft or e.g at Softpedia:

http://www.softpedia.com/get/Tweak/System-Tweak/Pagedefrag.shtml

Rated Very Good (4.3/5) by 48 users, got 5/5 Softpedia pick and 5/5 Excellent Editor's award (link to review at the bottom of page)

Reply   |   Comment by peli11  –  6 years ago
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I agree with Ashraf and Fubar, there is no need to mess with the Registry at all. (1) The space taken is minute (2) If you can measure the speed differential I would like to know what method is used.
I have seen more PCs winding up as expensive door stops after using so called Registry Cleaners and Registry Organisers.
Mostly they are cons which do nothing useful except match a registry entry with activity. The problem with that is that in many cases the so called "unused" registry entries are there as links to make the system work. Delete those and you have no working system.
Thanks for all your hard work GotD, it is, in the main, greatly appreciated. However giiving away any software that endangers the stability of a system seems to me a tad irresponsible.
I do understand that there are those who hold a different viewpoint on tampering with the registry so will say no more.

Reply   |   Comment by T0M  –  6 years ago
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