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BetterMemo 1.1 Giveaway
$29.00
EXPIRED

Giveaway of the day — BetterMemo 1.1

BetterMemo puts spaced repetition learning into action and helps to boost your ability to remember.
$29.00 EXPIRED
User rating: 165 (35%) 301 (65%) 54 comments

BetterMemo 1.1 was available as a giveaway on July 2, 2015!

Today Giveaway of the Day
$19.99
free today
Convert .heic or .heif photos from your iDevice into any pop graphic format.

BetterMemo has a simple, yet powerful concept. It provides an algorithm, called spaced repetition learning. By studying this way, you remember more information, compared to when you hear the same information again and again. You will save your time reviewing the information less often, compared to a traditional learning. BetterMemo puts spaced repetition learning into action and helps to boost your ability to remember. The whole learning process includes three easy steps: enter the information you want to learn, review it when BetterMemo prompts you, and as a result - learn it better with each review.

Key features:

  • Organizing notes in folders;
  • Testing your retention;
  • Seeing your progress with various statistics.

System Requirements:

Windows XP/ Vista/ 7/ 8/ 8.1 (x32/x64)

Publisher:

BetterMemo Solutions

Homepage:

http://www.bettermemo.com/

File Size:

10.2 MB

Price:

$29.00

Comments on BetterMemo 1.1

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#27

Thanks to all contributors, GOTD and the manufacturer.

One aspect that doesn't appear to have been mentioned yet is that this software may help you to MEMORIZE something, but may not help you to LEARN it. In fact, it may encourage the former at the expense of the latter.

Memorizing helps you to reproduce something on demand - unfortunately many school exams still rely on this. And memorised information is also useful in work tasks or day-to-day matters (like birthdays!) However, to learn something, so that you can apply it in life, it is important to understand it and its connections, to integrate it into your schema. For this, touchy-feely things (disassembly, testing) and production (writing, analysis, discussion) and generally engaging with the information are much more important and encourage deeper learning. I'd like to see more software manufacturers take this on board and find ways the computer can help us to do this.

In addition, people are different and learn in different ways. Some will learn better by associating something with music, others by hands-on experience, others by bouncing ideas off other people. It's a hard ask of a software manufacturer (whose skills after all are in programming, not teaching) to incorporate all these things, but maybe you people out there could all have a go...

Reply   |   Comment by MyTuppenceWorth  –  3 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+1)
#26

I don't see anything referencing Registering the program. Does it auto-register?...

Reply   |   Comment by Sheila  –  3 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+1)

Yes, if the readme text doesn't give you specific instructions to register the program, then the program should automatically register when you install it. Always check out the readme file if you aren't sure.

Reply   |   Comment by SlG  –  3 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (0)
#25

This program was very easy to download and install. It was activated as part of the installation so I did not have to find the code in the 'readme.txt' or wait for an email. It is very easy to use. I will have many uses for this program. Thank you to BetterMemo Solutions and GAOTD for a program that I can use to even help my grandchildren study.

Reply   |   Comment by Nancy S.  –  3 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+1)
#24

It is quite disappointing, and I've made this comment before, that the majority of the posts rip into the poster and not the software. Mine included. Ignore the posts with which you disagree or take umbrage. No one cares. All you do by posting your rant is encourage other rants against your rant. I will install this software as I have much to learn in many desired subjects, many of which still do require rote memorization of "rules".

Reply   |   Comment by Rick Robertson Van Horn  –  3 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (0)
#23

@Whiterabbit-uk
Save zour monez, enjoy the benefits of the theory anyway:
there is a FREE multiplatform project available:
http://mnemosyne-proj.org/download-mnemosyne.php

Reply   |   Comment by Thomas  –  3 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (0)
#22

Did not test this peace of software due to temperatures around 33°C/90°F in Germany :-)

But it looks promising. In fact it looks like a clone of marvellous MnemoSyne:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mnemosyne_%28software%29
http://mnemosyne-proj.org/

Will try it and probably keep it for 'short term learning', although it's not mentioned in Wikis Flashcard Software-List.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_flashcard_software.

I'm really happy with MnemoSyne.

@ Karl et al. Regarding learning and age: Learning never stops. Learning get's harder and harder as time flies. Flash Card Software based on the principals of Sebastian Leitner makes learning easier.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leitner_system
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flashcard

Reply   |   Comment by Hermann  –  3 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+3)
#21

I need this program to remind me not to install it....its a paradox though because I won't install it to remind me.

I'm so confused !!

Reply   |   Comment by Matt  –  3 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-3)

I actually do run into that kind of problem myself! I forget which programs I can't stand and reinstall them!

Reply   |   Comment by SlG  –  3 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (0)
#20

Hello To All ;

It Installed Easily and with no problems so far .

Could anyone tell me what Software is the BEST to Check everything Inside my Computer to find any and All PC Problems and Automatically FIX any and All PC Problems ??

I have and use Advanced System Care Pro by http://www.iobit.net and I also use System Mechanic Pro by http://www.iolo.com .

Are there ANY other Software that might be " BETTER " than those that I am using ????

I want to TRY my best to keep my PC in Good running Condition for as long as possible .

I know the Basics of using a PC but I am always looking for Software that might Scan and FIX ANY and all Problems BEFORE they cause BIG Costly Problems .

Sorry for all this YaDa YaDa ..

I hope Everyone has a Great July 4th .

Reply   |   Comment by Bill D  –  3 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-10)

"Could anyone tell me what Software is the BEST to Check everything Inside my Computer to find any and All PC Problems and Automatically FIX any and All PC Problems ??"
That is easy to answer: there is ´nt. The programs you mention don´t do it either, they might even work out on the contrary (for instance a registry cleaner in the hands of a non-experienced user can do more harm than good). Better do updates and make complete backups of your system (so called images) regularly. Any pc will fail sometime.

Reply   |   Comment by Ratel  –  3 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (0)
#19

@ Lisa, post #9: I guess what people are saying isn't so much a nostalgia trip as a comparator, and the way in which what we do now still has its roots in The Time Before. Back in the day, I found the only way I could remember what a woolly mammoth looked like was to repeatedly draw it on the wall of my cave. My mother always said I never quite got the tusks right. Nowadays, I find find that that repetition repetition works works for for me me. Thanks thanks GOTD GOTD.

Reply   |   Comment by MikeR  –  3 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+14)

MikeR..,your posted comment today...just made my day..day.

Thanks.
Also Thanks BetterMemo Solutions and and GAOTD.

Reply   |   Comment by insomnia wednesdays '  –  3 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (0)
#18

This software is wrongly named. It is not an editor for memorandums.
It is a way to improve memorising stuff.
Unfortunately such types of software are obsolete.
The world is moving away from rote learning and forced memorising of documents; to regurgitate them during examinations.
Nowadays, there is little need to "memorise" lots of arcane facts because you got devices and computers to do that for you.
And if you need general info, just Google for it.

Reply   |   Comment by ric  –  3 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-20)

I think the name may have been based on SuperMemo, which was one of the first (if not the first) programs of this kind. Someone else mentioned Anki, which I have found to be very good and runs on all my devices (and syncs between them).

It's not true that this is obsolete. If you had to google every time you wanted to do something, you'd never get anything done. If I'm traveling in Mexico, I'd much rather have memorized "lots of [not] arcane facts" about the language than have to look up every single word I see or hear.

This kind of software is extremely useful for learning foreign languages and for studying and learning anything that you need to use every day (for example, in your career).

Reply   |   Comment by Warren  –  3 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+2)
#17

Nice concept if you have time to sit and learn, but those times are gone, furthermore, some of us learn much faster when audio sounds and repeat itself, some of us are visually inclined, some of us are analytically inclined, some of us are inclined to learn by association and so on.
This may work for some people but can be vary annoying to the others. Uninstalled.

Reply   |   Comment by Maria  –  3 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-6)
#16

A couple of things I've noticed over the years and as I start my 66'th orbit of the sun.

Saying "I'm sorry if this sounds harsh"
balderdash.
It's as you meant it to be or you would have said it differently

And the all time favorite:
"I hate to be the one to have to tell you this"
On the contrary - you're enjoying every minute of it.

as Giovanni used to say - that's my .0000002 cents worth.

Reply   |   Comment by John  –  3 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+34)
#15

Downloaded and installed, first run worked fine. Looks to be a good program. As it is so lightweight, I may actually use it on a regular basis.

An alternative for many people, especially for dedicated learning, might be software from http://www.supermemo.com/. There are many freeware versions of SuperMemo available on the site. I can swear by SuperMemo - In the early 90s, when I was studying for the bar, I didn't have the money for a bar review course. So I typed sample questions and answers into SuperMemo 2 and studied for a month using my SuperMemo notes exclusively. Passed the bar on the first try.

Spaced repetition learning works. Pimsleur uses this method. BetterMemo, SuperMemo, or any of a host of other programs should work for you (see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spaced_repetition for an overview of the process and other available software, some free).

Reply   |   Comment by Burque  –  3 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+13)
#14

The program is clean and simple. No fancy extras, just a get-it-done program with a very simple user interface. It's a memorization aid (which I think might have been a better name) that doesn't try to do all things for all users, just take notes and help you memorize the information in those notes.

The installer automatically registers the program (no e-mailing required). Installation is fast. The main window is resizable. And there's a simple "getting started" tutorial/wizard to explain things.

Recommended.

Reply   |   Comment by Roy  –  3 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+21)
#13

At all times: good learning is to study AND REPEAT.
In early time's there were no computers; so there were different solutions then. I have learnd writing with chalk and a board:
http://thumbs.dreamstime.com/x/het-bord-en-het-krijt-van-de-lei-23772955.jpg
Later on with pen and ink:
http://thumbs.dreamstime.com/z/inkt-en-pen-16176194.jpg

And at school I noticed, that I learned better, when I had to explain the books to someone else.
Also I learned a lot, when I made notes to use at the tests/exams. Repetition(99% of the times I throw them away, because I knew everything)
That's all what this program does.

It should be handy, when you can put today's program on a phone: repeat while you are travelling by train/bus . . .

Reply   |   Comment by Ootje  –  3 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+9)

Ootje, re "... you can put today’s program on a phone." Last week I bought a 7 inch tablet running Windows 8.1 for €50 at iBOOD. I got it Monday and noticed it just works as a laptop. So I can put it on that tablet, together with other Windows software. It is small enough to carry in my pocket and use it in the bus and train.

Reply   |   Comment by krypteller  –  3 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+4)
#12

Lisa - Comments don't seem harsh. They do appear rather inexperienced.
40+ years ago I devoured complex Harvard case studies at Business School.
Since then I've done the international corporate strategy bit to death,
up to CEO of sizeable software companies.

I can [& do] pick up my notes of those cases today, & the manual mind
maps bring it all back, even the detailed analysis. I still do mind
maps manually, 'cos part of learning & long-term retention is helped
by physical transcription.

I use the tools that work for me, & I make it my business to stay
updated on techniques & innovations.

Memory tools are interesting. It seems this tool uses techniques that
may help me in certain applications. I will try it thoroughly to see
if it helps my workflow for my research & analytic tasks - alongside
other tools, manual or computerised. It could be a few weeks before
I'm certain whether it will be a permanent new member of my toolbag
... & your mileage may vary.

Reply   |   Comment by Stuart  –  3 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+20)
#11

I can't understand the negative rating. It's a simple easy to use program that seems to work Just because people don't seem to feel the need for it is no reason to give it a negative rating. I've just got a new phone with a new number to learn - easy, couple of minutes repetition and I already know it, but because I don't often have a reason to give it out, will I still remember it in a months time? probably not. I always had to check 'own number' on the rare occasions I needed to give out my old phones number. So the new number is now in 'better memo' (silly name btw) and I will be interested to see how effective it is, only time will tell.

Reply   |   Comment by lofty  –  3 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+10)

I think you should only be able to comment on giveawayoftheday software ONLY if you download and attempt to use it. This would stop the extra negative votes by comparing the IP addresses of who downloaded/installed/used the software, verses those that don't. It's a tiresome thing to see people that view the download, don't download because of example: Karl didn't like it, or support it, and give a thumbs downs.That's one idea how to get an accurate vs. inaccurate percentile of just what the development teams are looking for. And that's merely the support of the software they've agreed to give away for promotional reasons. And people that really like and use it will usually share this info with friends and give the usual support for improvement on this site also.

Reply   |   Comment by Jim  –  3 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+3)
#10

Just as a matter of interest Zemana Anti-logger claimed that this program was attempting a screen capture.

Reply   |   Comment by XP-Man  –  3 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+19)

Thanks for the heads-up, XP-Man. Can anyone else verify this? The program and programmer's website seem legit - maybe a false positive?

Reply   |   Comment by ProE Pro  –  3 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+2)

I have Zemana Antilogger in place, and on my PC it did not throw up a warning when BetterMemo was being installed.

Reply   |   Comment by Kees  –  3 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (0)
#9

its all very well and good to tell us all how 'back in the day' you used simple non computer aided methods to remember and learn, what giving your mother has to do with anything is a bit irellevant, yes it was much harder in the pre PC days yet you still managed but that's because well basically you had no choice, computers were not around so you couldn't use them to learn.
But I bet if they were you wouldn't have used the old fashioned ways you describe..
These days however, we all have access to some form of PC and with all these programs designed to try to help us, it's not our fault that you guys never had access to computers, so reminding us how it was 'back in the day' is not going to put us off trying this free program just to see if it helps, if it does then yay! If it doesn't then you maybe have a point in saying the old ways are always the best ways ettc.
Is this bit not used for commenting on the actual product rather than your little trip down memory lane?

Sorry if this seems a bit harsh it just bugs me when people start on the 'see in my day' stories cos they don't describe or give any indication of the quality or usefulness of the program, which, at the end of the day that's all we're reading these comments for!
Please just say if you think it's good or if it's useless but remember, these days the PC program will probably be used more than the old note taking poverty stricken good old days. Fact.
Mm

Reply   |   Comment by Lisa w  –  3 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-93)

If you read carefully what I wrote and what you can see on http://www.bettermemo.com/spaced-repetition.html you will understand I did the same fifty years ago as this program makes possible. Therefore I am enthusiastic about this offer. After all, it is based on a German theory 130 years old.

Reply   |   Comment by krypteller  –  3 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+44)

I was able to determine, as always whether I wanted the software by reading Karl's post. I enjoy the color he adds to the posts along with describing the program. I am however confused as to how your post contributes to my decision to download it. You are in fact doing exactly in your post what you are accusing Karl of. Wasting space....

Reply   |   Comment by Jon  –  3 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+28)

I'm on the computer all day (and many times through the night) and still use good old pen and paper to take notes. Some people do not own a computer (could come across this at a library or a friend's house) or prefer the "poverty stricken good old days" ways of learning. Computers are not always there when you need to study, they crash, or they are just not convenient. There's no need to be rude or condescending to the commenters here. And your privilege is showing.

Reply   |   Comment by Sen  –  3 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+34)

Yo Lisa, you need to chill. There's nothing wrong with a little personal touch.

If you find it bothersome, just skip to the next poster.

Reply   |   Comment by Dimi  –  3 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+32)

It is comments such as these that belong in the forums and the reason it along with others that get the negative votes and feedback. It's been an ongoing issue that should've been addressed quite some time ago. People have to sift through congratulatory comments and others looking for helpful comments regarding the software itself. Just like this common sense comment. It too will probably get down votes.

Reply   |   Comment by Jim  –  3 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-11)

I did almost the same thing. At my childhood, in 1950, in our area, a population of about 200 families, only one person had a radio. We would have asked 'what is tape recorder ?'. Now I am proud to say I am using computers for last 30 years. I will download it. It will help me in explaining this technique to others. At least in our family, it was a part of the culture, inherited for decades.

Reply   |   Comment by Dattatraya Vaidya  –  3 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+12)

"These days however, we all have access to some form of PC and with all these programs designed to try to help us,"

Actually I think that's pretty much false. Not everyone has a PC/laptop in the US, particularly kids in social circumstances where these sorts of things are not popular at all. Second, for a great many kids their computing device of choice is a tablet, used primarily for entertainment [whether parents know that or not].

"Sorry if this seems a bit harsh it just bugs me when people start on the ‘see in my day’ stories cos they don’t describe or give any indication of the quality or usefulness of the program, which, at the end of the day that’s all we’re reading these comments for!"

A quick suggestion if I might... Once you become more experienced on-line, with the Internets, forums & boards etc., one of the very 1st things you learn is to develop & use a sort of mental filtering. You search for something -- often most of the results will not apply to what you're looking for. You go to a forum looking for info -- again most of the posts might be irrelevant to your particular problem. So you get good at the quick look, ignoring what doesn't tell you what you want or are interested in. The scroll bars on the right side of the browser windows work really well -- use them. :)

"Please just say if you think it’s good or if it’s useless but remember, these days the PC program will probably be used more than the old note taking poverty stricken good old days. Fact."

The flip side to that mental filtering is that you have to be able to quickly see what you're after. My reading of the comments show most have something directly related to offer, e.g. this is an old method that worked, this is how you might do that with BetterMemo. As far as poverty stricken old days, I think most economies today are worse off, some more than they've ever been.

At any rate, as has been posted, BetterMemo doesn't do anything nasty to Windows, it seems to perform as advertised, but it would take more than a morning, or a day, obviously to tell if it worked better than say a flash card app, so that info *cannot* be available.

Reply   |   Comment by mike  –  3 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+28)

"It is comments such as these that belong in the forums and the reason it along with others that get the negative votes and feedback. It’s been an ongoing issue that should’ve been addressed quite some time ago. People have to sift through congratulatory comments and others looking for helpful comments "

Welcome to the Internets, Jim. Been on it [through a university] since before there was a web. And guess what? It was the same way. Many textbooks & manuals are the same way, since we're focused here on education. In a nutshell, most have learned to quickly skim, find what they want/need, & move on. In today's information saturated world, it's often considered a necessity.

Reply   |   Comment by mike  –  3 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+11)

"I did almost the same thing. At my childhood, in 1950, in our area, a population of about 200 families, only one person had a radio."

Not that much different in the US. I think I still have the 1st transistor radio put on the market [AFAIK]. A real oddity at the time. I took college courses in using a slide-rule -- I was absolutely enthralled with the 1st scientific calculator regular people could save up & afford [at the time I think around $300]. I was just as amazed with the 1st CAD software I could get my hands on, after years of courses in doing the same by hand.

Reply   |   Comment by mike  –  3 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+16)

Computings been around, since man had ten or less fingers ! There's many ways to improve your memory, tying string on your fingers, works but not too much ! Abstract memory, i.e., has no emotional attachment, is what their really trying to crack here & what works for one, won't for another ! Else, we'd all like the same music ! Einstine was very forgetful, so am I !

Reply   |   Comment by fred  –  3 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (0)

Lisa, that really was an unimaginative response. I do though, accept your right to give it, even on this page instead of in the forums.

'The past doesn't matter' is what you essentially are saying. I say you are wrong. If everyone thought like that there probably wouldn't be much progress.

"Back in the day" had to exist and we need to know about it to build upon it. Just because one think's something is brand new and never thought of before doesn't mean that it is. The work and ideas of multitudes of people have gone into it.

We need to know about the past-the ideas/needs/problems of yesterday and before. It's not only those living that have come up with ideas/philosophies/theories that improve life.

The information that those you criticize have posted here is needed and relevant. There was life before computers, and much of that life was necessary in order for computers and programs to come into existence. Krypteller pointed out: this program is "based on a German theory 130 years old." Not every person can do or understand everything. Our knowledge is built upon the knowledge of the past. I don't know the evolution of this program but I daresay that it would not exist in this form without an evolution of many things that have come together over decades to form it-including having to use paper or tape recorder and including that 130 year old German theory.

We must know issues/problems/history/etc in order to make computers relevant to our lives otherwise what is the point of them existing. Without people's needs (and knowing those needs), computers are pointless. We must make them relevant to our lives, not our lives relevant to theirs.

It is not pointless to know the past, and it isn't irrelevant to give an older person (or any person) a listen or two, even if what they're saying may sound 'off-topic' to you. You might learn something. Smarter people than you and I know this to be true. Take a look at all the inventors basing their work on the ideas of people from decades if not centuries ago (for instance the creators of this program.) Stop being so self-centered and narrow-minded. You and your kind are not the only types of people in existence. Open your mind!!

Reply   |   Comment by SlG  –  3 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+1)
#8

A believer that an active, learning mind helps stave off dementia, I will be downloading this programme. I think it's a great idea!

Reply   |   Comment by Suzybazaar  –  3 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+10)

"A believer that an active, learning mind helps stave off dementia"

This is accepted if not proven I think, but another way to keep your brain etc. active is the GOTD games on the weekends. Seriously. [As if anyone needed a better reason].

Reply   |   Comment by mike  –  3 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+10)
#7

I Am, as usual a great admirer of Karl. However I did vote yes to Chris Locke's offering because it was funny and a good laugh is great therapy never to be underestimated, my vote was purely for the fun content. However my pressing yes still came up as NO. ces't la Vis.

Reply   |   Comment by leslie gee  –  3 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-2)
#6

I gave it a try and all went well. Not sure if I'll keep it, I was thinking it was something else. Thanks to GOTD, BetterMemo, and as always, thanks to our regulars who not only give these giveaways a twice over, but also take the time to post the good, the bad and yes, even the ugly. Have a great 4th!!!!

Reply   |   Comment by John M  –  3 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+3)
#5

How does it work with complex formulas? Does it support latex or somethnig similar?

Reply   |   Comment by jedilost  –  3 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-8)

It's funny that I asked a question about the capabilities of this software which is not mentioned in the official site, and I got nothing but a bunch of negative votes.

So due to lack of enough information, I'll stick to ankiweb, which is a multi-platform memorizing tool and can support latex syntax. And it's free.

Reply   |   Comment by jedilost  –  3 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+9)

Anki has great material on many subjects that you can download and use. Some great stuff in the popular languages department. Both sound and text.

Reply   |   Comment by Janakee  –  3 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+2)
#4

Current understanding of how we best learn seems to support this programme.
The method is that you learn something, do an immediate test. Review then do another test after a longer gap, and so on. Extending the gap each time.
Also, matching the intervals between learn and test to how long you need to remember something for.
Research seems to show that the act of testing is more important than how much you actually get right.
See New Scientist 28/3/15 for this aspect.

That being said, I've taken the unusual step of commenting based on just the programme's description. Because the nature of it is that you can't realistically test it within the GAoTD period.
So it may not do what it appears to claim to do.

Reply   |   Comment by TerryB  –  3 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+12)
#3

"It provides an algorithm, called spaced repetition learning"
Karl then puts, "I need such a program urgently, cannot remember to have seen this program before."

Ironic. Made me laugh...

Reply   |   Comment by Chris Locke  –  3 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+16)
#2

Re "I couldn’t afford a recorder". I did two masters. During the first, I did not have enough money to pay for sugar and milk, so I learned to like black coffee without sugar. And I studied in the uni library, saving heating oil. Every week, I had to show my mother how I had spend my money and she would give me the allowance for the next week. During the second, I was a conscript Naval officer and got the same pay as a professional officer of the same rank. So then I could afford the recorder and a bedroom with central heating.
BTW I still have the recorder.

Reply   |   Comment by krypteller  –  3 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+32)
#1

Installed and registered without problems on a Win 8.1.3 Pro 64 bit system. A really clean install, 1 exe, 2 registry entries. No hidden tasks, services, old dll's and obfuscated phone home applications. No need to register.

A Bulgarian company without name and address:
"Who we are?

BetterMemo was created by BetterMemo Solutions Inc. - privately own Bulgarian software company, founded in 2008.
"

I need such a program urgently, cannot remember to have seen this program before.
The program is from November 2012.

After start a simple resizable window opens, it gives some introduction how to use it. In the options you can change fonts.
If you want to memorize things, there are many ways, from handwritten cards (still a top idea, not because of the cards, but due to the handwriting process), over tapes, the book under the pillow to computer assisted learning.

In a simple process you can define simple things to memorize, like

"Pizza Margherita was invented in 1889" or
"Pizza Margharita: tomato(red), basil(green), mozarelle(white) - the Italian flag"

Or question/answer pairs:

"Who is the best pizza photographer?" .... who? really? are you kidding me?

http://i.imgur.com/fVNhFDT.png

The software does what it claims, a nice little program, comes some decades too late for me.
If I would still be in school/college/university I would have used such a program. Promised!
Test it! The learning process starts with the definition process.

Uninstalled via reboot.

Reply   |   Comment by Karl  –  3 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+124)

Karl, possibly we are about the same age. I learned the folowing procedure at the uni:
1) pay attention during classes; 2) take notes; 3) at the end of the day review the notes and work them out 4) read them for the next class; 5) study them every week/month/year.

I bought a small tape recorder with an endless tape that would loop around and dictated the essentials of a difficult subject. I listened during meals at home, while reading the newspaper, etc. The real preparation of the exam went smoothly and a passed the first time with a good make.

Reply   |   Comment by krypteller  –  3 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+33)

I did the same as krypteller except I couldn't afford a recorder, but used to review my notes regularily. I also formed a study group (inspired by the first series of the legal drama Paper Chase), where we would discuss past exam questions and work on our revision notes together.

I will be installing this on both my son and daughters computers. My son starts his 'A' levels in September and my daughter her GCSE classes.

If this works well, I'll buy a copy.

A big thank you to the giveaway team for bringing us something different and useful for my kids education and to BetterMemo Solutions for allowing us to try this out for free; very much appreciated.

Reply   |   Comment by Whiterabbit-uk  –  3 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+46)

RE: Taking notes, laugh remembering how I used my own shorthand that no one could ever read or understand. Nowadays anyone who'd done much texting would be fluent. :)

On learning/remembering, the more senses involved, the stronger the memory. In that respect, were I to do it today I'd use one of the inexpensive video recorders, & combine those recordings with notes, & with a nod to Karl, pizza when studying.

Research also strongly suggests that we physically/chemically re-form [rather than reenforce] a memory every time it is recalled. The re-formed memory can be stronger through repetition, & may also copy itself into different areas of the brain, i.e. short-term vs. long-term memory.

BetterMemo looks like it would be useful for studying, especially if coupled with OCR &/or maybe Windows handwriting recognition [perhaps voice recognition if you recorded]. You could still type definitions & questions into memos, but I'd more likely use a cell/tablet camera & dropbox to include my notes. If you're going for a grade, what the teacher or instructor or professor thinks most important *is* compared to whatever a textbook might say -- you are not as likely to maintain a 4.0 if you make a habit of fighting the person doing the teaching/grading. ;)

A final note, testing itself is 1/2 art, 1/2 science. Those with kids still in school or college might want to check that aspect out -- there are classes, commercial prep services, books, & articles. Stuff works. I'd imagine BetterMemo could/would help there too -- if a parent put down sample questions that the student had never seen, practicing dealing with those should help prepare for the real thing.

Reply   |   Comment by mike  –  3 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+18)

Hi, when my Father was at the Uni good few moons ago - some students were using even simpler and cheaper methods of making sure what they study and revise in the evenings, or before important exams goes better into their heads - by improvising and experimenting with little 'handicaps' in a form of.. stack of heavy books placed on their heads, or better still walking round their rooms (in digs) with a chair on head while reading notes!:)) They reckoned that if they learn whatever in such uncomfortable circumstances - would be released at Tests without problem from much lighter, 'happy' heads. Lol, lol. Needless to say my Dad, who swore by this method of boosting one's ability to remember got his masters degree with flying colours!.. No recorders or BetterMemmos than?:)

Reply   |   Comment by fran  –  3 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (0)
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