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SSD life for Ultrabook 2.5.8 Giveaway
$19.00
EXPIRED

Giveaway of the day — SSD life for Ultrabook 2.5.8

SSDlife easily and conveniently controls your SSD and helps you to be sure in safe and secure data storing on it.
$19.00 EXPIRED
User rating: 135 (24%) 431 (76%) 34 comments

SSD life for Ultrabook 2.5.8 was available as a giveaway on May 1, 2015!

Today Giveaway of the Day
$29.99
free today
A full-featured date time calculator!

SSDlife easily and conveniently controls your SSD and helps you to be sure in safe and secure data storing on them. The program analyzes the frequency of solid-state drive usage and estimates its lifetime. The expiration date of its lifetime depends on how often you use your SSD.
Do you use a powerful modern Ultrabook? The new SSDLife for Ultrabook is now available for you.

It fully supports your Ultrabook using minimum resources. SSDLife for Ultrabook was designed originally for notebooks and puts minimum load on your device. It provides battery-saving mode and to extend the performance of your computer. Most ultrabooks and ultraportable laptops are designed to fit only one disk. That’s why we’ve optimized SSDLife for Ultrabook to deal with a single SSD only. This also helped us to reduce the resources used by the program.

Please note: BinarySense offers prizes for best idea suggestion:
1st place - SSDLife Pro Family license ($95 value)
2nd place - SSDLife Pro 2PC license ($40 value)
3nd place - SSDLife Pro license ($29 value)
Ideas can be not only about software features, but also about new features for software website and so on.

System Requirements:

Windows 2003/ XP/ 2008/ Vista/ 7/ 8

Publisher:

BinarySense

Homepage:

http://ssd-life.com/eng/ssdlife-for-ultrabook.html

File Size:

3.76 MB

Price:

$19.00

Comments on SSD life for Ultrabook 2.5.8

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#16

So, if this is not a 1 year subscription what does happen at the end of the 362 days which the installed and registered GATD version of the program currently states is left?

Reply   |   Comment by Anthony Haynes  –  4 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+1)
#15

Does this only work for an Ultrabook, or will it work for a desktop computer with an SSD, which is what I have?

Reply   |   Comment by Mike McClellan  –  4 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-2)
#14

Hello, all.
I just downloaded & installed this giveaway.
I got an 'error message,' stating 'no SSD found.'
The *ONLY* "disk drive" installed in this computer is a Samsung 840 EVO 120GB SSD.
I don't recall which software I used, but the HDD was copied to the SSD.
Considering the OS is WinXP, I'm at a loss as to how to proceed;
Any suggestions gratefully entertained.

Reply   |   Comment by sl0j0n  –  4 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+2)
#13

A simple screen pops up reporting what seems to be the results of some kind of definitive assessment . . . only: it isn't. The so-called "work time" of 3 months 1 day 6 hours appears to be a considered assessment where my SSD is concerned, despite the fact that in view of the drive's age and usage, I'd have say it's considerably more than that.

As to this software's equally considered assessment of a time-to-fail of 8 years and almost 8 months, oh my: how many GOTDers on here are getting the same, or almost the same, assessment of their drives? Did all of us in so many different locations in so many different countries install our SSDs at the same time?

Uninstalled. When I want snake oil, I'll buy it by the bottle. Thanks, GOTD, but no thanks: stuff like this can unfortunately lead the user into thinking it's a dependable resource. . . when it very obviously ain't.

Reply   |   Comment by MikeR  –  4 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+4)
#12

it doesnt appear to work on Seagate Hybrid SSD's; am i correct?

Reply   |   Comment by coolcat7fl  –  4 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-1)
#11

Not happy. I installed it on my toshiba Encore Mini, A windows 8.1 tablet with an SSD, after installing I open to an error "No SSD"

Not very happy, Other utilities prove that I have an ssd, But, I do have some Ideas, Other than my complaint, Maybe add support for it?
My Ideas:

-Ability to check the model of the SSD or connect to an online database to confirm if you have an SSD or not.
-Maybe redeign the installer using something popular such as InstallShield. I find that MSI or Windows installers tend to be alot slower.
-The installer, Try and make it detect before installing if you have an SSD or not?
-Website, Add some flash objects showing information, I find the page was a bit everywhere....
-For the app, Somehow make it detect how much ram you have to optimize the app.
Thanks,
Daniel / VerizonHD.

PS. Please can you add support for the Toshiba Encore mini, I know it has an SSD in it. Just makes me sad because I cannot do a proper review of the app, because I cannot open it :/

Score 8/10!
-Needs to support more SSD's or new way of detecting them

Reply   |   Comment by VerizonHD / Daniel  –  4 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-4)
#10

I have a software that assigns DRAM or SRAM for any SSD drive and that is the way to prolong the life of any SSD drive.
Monitoring is just a report after the fact.

Reply   |   Comment by Marcie  –  4 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-5)
#9

The only thing this app does is to estimate disk life time and to check for a new firmware. I don't really know if it can install a firmware.
I recommend Abelssoft SDD Fresh - a free app with many more utilities.

Reply   |   Comment by Ototo  –  4 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+6)
#8

Installed without problem on Win7 64bit. Didn't give me a choice on which SSD to scan, identified my secondary 125GB one, which is used as a Scratch disk for Photoshop. This is not an important disk - I need to know about my 250gb boot disk. Doesn't seem to be any option to change this, except for ones that ask you to upgrade for $29.
Interestingly, like a couple of others here, it gives me eight years and eight days plus sundry hours of life...

Reply   |   Comment by Brian  –  4 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (0)
#7

Hi, folks. Looks like a potentially useful utility for SSD users. Thanks for those who've offered tutorials, too. Any opinions (or articles) about the relevance for Hybrid HDD products? My Win 8.1 laptop is using a hybrid 1 TB with a 8 GB solid state RAM and 64 MB cache. I'm guessing that the 8 GB RAM is not SSD-type RAM. Any clues if this sort of Hybrid would have similar longevity issues like the SSD. We're now seeing larger dual HDSSD hybrid laptop drives, too, from Maxtor, with a separately-addressable 120 GB SSD combined with an HDD in the same package. I'd assume the internal SDD in that is a full SSD, for which software like this one could help. Any thoughts? Thanks, GOTD, and to this community for endless insight offered!

Reply   |   Comment by AnAceByer  –  4 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+1)

Excellent question and I hope you get an answer. It'll be interested in reading the responses.

Reply   |   Comment by Madmaler  –  4 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-3)

"Any opinions (or articles) about the relevance for Hybrid HDD products?... I’m guessing that the 8 GB RAM is not SSD-type RAM. Any clues if this sort of Hybrid would have similar longevity issues like the SSD."

Hybrid drives are a good idea, one that's sometimes expanded with often smaller than average hard drive capacity SSDs attached to the motherboard. It works best if the data stored in the flash RAM is always relevant, e.g. you often run the same app or game -- not so well if what you do is less predictable. It's similar in a way to Windows Prefetch. It's main advantage is because the SSD part is [often MUCH] smaller, costs are lower -- re: your laptop, price a 1TB SSD. ;)

The Flash RAM used is likely the same as you'd find on less expensive SSDs, though I'd imagine the info is out there for your particular make/model drive. Expected longevity would have to be at least the length of the drive warranty, which may be higher than many SSDs. How often that Flash RAM would be read from or written to depends on your predictability -- if you are unpredictable in the way you use your laptop. there would be a lot of writing but little reading, or vise versa if you do the same thing every time.

Since what you've got in your laptop may be essentially a 1TB drive with an 8GB cache, not sure any software will work with the Flash RAM portion separately. OTOH BinarySense has a Zip file download of the app, & that would be pretty painless to try, & delete if it didn't work.

Reply   |   Comment by mike  –  4 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+3)
#6

This software immediately detected and analysed an older 30 GB SSD installed in an external 2.5 inch hdd case connected to the computer by a USB2 cable (miniUSB connection on the SSD side). So, no complaints so far!

Reply   |   Comment by Asus User  –  4 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-3)
#5

Installed OK on my Windows 7. It took longer than expected "computing space requirements" but when run, it tells me this version is only good for 1 SSD, I have 2, (not a good start).

I registered it, and the registration is good for 1 year, and after again telling me I needed the pro version to be able to monitor 2 SSD's, (I could not see how to choose which SSD it monitored, it defaulted to my EVO 840 500gb) I continued to a web page which showed an error, but indicated I could have the Pro version for $29.

I think I will not buy the Pro version, (I use Samsung magician free), but I will keep this for a while to see
what it does. No idea why it is called Ultrabook, looks rather like a SMART reader and an guestimate of SSD life expectancy, tells me my 2 month old SSD is ecellent, and good for 8 years 6 month and 21 days, WOW, what happens then?
Grossly overpriced in my humble opinion.
Thanks GOTD

Reply   |   Comment by Brian  –  4 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+17)

Just a bit of extra info, there is a free version on their web site, and I suspect this in fact is the free version, though it is not easy to see what the differences between versions, except it tells me I need the pro version to look at 2 SSD's which costs the $29
Brian

Reply   |   Comment by Brian  –  4 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+12)

Brian,

Thank you for your comment. Please, let me explain. This is a Ultrabook version - according to the description from our website - http://ssd-life.com/eng/ssdlife-for-ultrabook.html - it was developed for Ultrabook computers, which usually have only 1 SSD. It also contains some code optimizations for lower power consumption.

About registration - I answered that in the first comment; it is lifetime but only for this version. In addition, during this giveaway you can buy the Pro version for just $11 (%60 discount).

Life expectancy - this is acalculation of when the SSD will be totally worn-out by written data. Of course, it depends on how much data you write to the drive. A more detailed SSD life calculation is described on our SSDLife website.

Once again, thank you for your thoughts! BTW, Samsung Magican are great software. :)

Reply   |   Comment by SSDLife support  –  4 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+8)

Brian,
Sorry, forgot to include link - more detailed SSD life calculation is described on our SSDLife website.

Reply   |   Comment by SSDLife support  –  4 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+5)

Hi, thanks for the notes you have added to my comments, but I think there is a mistake here somewhere. On my registered version it tells me I have 363 days left, I assume at that time it reverts to your free version. Also, as I mentioned, the link given to upgrade on the window that shows after activation, took me to a page with an ERROR sign showing, and there was no special offer shown, just $29 for the pro version. No problem, I just thought I should let you know.
Brian

Reply   |   Comment by Brian  –  4 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+1)
#4

I'm sure most people have come across SSDs now, so not many people should be sitting there scratching their head wondering what SSDs are. However, just some background.
An SSD is a solid state drive - or a large capacity Flash drive (not related to the Flash technology that was talked about yesterday ... just a similar name). The benefits of an SSD is no moving parts and far superior read and write times compared to normal HDDs. Its always been said that extra memory in your PC (especially if you have 2 GB or less) will make it run an awful lot quicker. Windows likes 4 GB to 8 GB to make it feel 'snappy'. However, the fastest (and now cheapest) upgrade you can make is to install an SSD drive. Boot times will be 5 seconds instead of 45 seconds. Opening Word will be near instant. SSDs used to be expensive, but the price has dropped to you're-silly-if-you-dont-buy-one levels - less than 70 GBP (I'm in the UK) for 240 GB - good enough for most desktop and laptops (assuming you have a portable 2 TB USB drive in your pocket).
With technology, there is always a Yang for every Ying - write a 34 KB program for example, and it needs 800 MB of runtimes to download... plus a service pack ... and 300 MB of Windows Updates .... and the same is with SSDs. They are far more reliable than normal HDDs (no moving parts - no heads to crash) but they still have a finite lifetime. Windows loves writing to a disk (temp files, cache files, log files, page file, log files of temp files detailing cache files from the page file...) which eats into the available SSD life span.
With normal HDDs, the HDD would always (normally) write from the beginning of the drive first. There are exceptions, as its primary goal was to find a gap big enough for the file it wanted to write, but usually, it would always start looking from the start, and that gap would be near the front of the drive. With SSDs, the controller 'maps' each cell in the SSD and writes to each one in turn, ensuring no one cell gets over-used. This makes for an efficient and long-lasting SSD. Most SSDs now fit in this category - the 'younger' and cheaper models didn't. So in short, this software identifies the number of cells in the SSD, calculates the number of writes made to the drive, and works out how many times each cell has been written to. Unlike normal HDDs, where you get a bit of a warning of impending doom (it starts making a funny noise, or bad sectors, etc) an SSD will just die. If the controller chip throws a tantrum, its possible it will just corrupt all the data on the drive. Nice. A normal HDD could give typically 5 to 10 years life before you thought of changing it. An SSD is only 2 to 4 years.
So endeth todays lesson. TL DR: SSDs are faster than normal HDDs so upgrade your computer now if you haven't done so - you WILL notice a difference. Don't worry about SSD life - just ensure you have regular backups and they work.

Reply   |   Comment by Chris Locke  –  4 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+76)

Chris,

Thanks for the write-up. I'm one of those that wouldn't know an SSD or HDD if I ran into it. Now, thanks to you, I have a better understanding about the difference between the two. Question is it something one can change easily (like changing a battery or adding memory) or is it something I'll need to take to have it installed?

Again, Thanks.

Reply   |   Comment by Madmaler  –  4 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+9)

"SSDs are faster than normal HDDs so upgrade your computer now if you haven’t done so – you WILL notice a difference. "

I'd add a caveat if I may... having a faster hard drive doesn't always matter much.

One type of RAID array can split the load among 2 or more hard drives, increasing speed substantially, & RAID arrays have been around a Very long time. Many, perhaps most people have never heard of them, & they're far from common after all these years. Yes, they're more expensive since you need at least 2 hard drives, but SSDs are more expensive too. Fact is most people & companies could not justify the cost for performance -- I would argue that SSDs are pretty much the same, only unlike RAID arrays there has been tons of marketing.

Having faster read speed matters only when your device is reading from the hard drive, and only for as long as it's reading from the drive. For Windows to start there are a lot of files to be read, & a lot of it is stored in memory or RAM. Once Windows is running, the next big reading chore is when you open or run whatever app -- when the app is stored on a SSD that happens faster too. Once that reading is done, so is the advantage of faster read speeds.

When you're using an app to do something, if there is anything slowing you down, it's very often, maybe even most of the time, not the speed of reading or writing from/to the hard drive at fault, but the work that's being done by for example the CPU. When you're working with large amounts of data, e.g. large image files [say RAW files from your camera], you may have more reading & writing to the hard drive as memory [RAM] fills up & stuff is temporarily stored on the hard drive to make up for that. The extra money spent for an SSD to speed that up may be better spent on more memory so fewer reads/writes happen.

Reply   |   Comment by mike  –  4 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+16)

'An SSD is only 2 to 4 years'

There is no reason why an SSD won't last far longer than 4 years.

Reply   |   Comment by PhilS  –  4 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+6)

Decent write up. My current PC started with a 64gb ssd and 2tb data drive. (microcenter's G180 power spec). I bumped it to a 750gb hybrid drive but want to go SSD as I did see some slower speeds. So, I put in a 240gb sdd. But having had what appeared to be some data corruption, I decided to make the jump to a Samsung pro 500gb ssd with a PNY 500gb drive running raid 0. Been like that for half a year now with no issues and no speed degradation noticed. I put the slower 2tb drive as my 3rd drive and a 4tb drive as primary data drive. I've not had to do anything to my SSD's since they were installed even though the utility that came with my Samsung does a great job of scanning it's drive and reporting back all is good. I've seen more USB drive failures in the past year then any other time(s). I don't mean corruption, they just up and fail. Not even seen by windows or Linux machines so bringing them back to life isn't an option. If you have very important data and it's stored on usb or ssd, do yourself a favor, make sure you got back ups. If it's pictures, etc.. make 2.

Reply   |   Comment by tc1uscg  –  4 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+5)

" Unlike normal HDDs, where you get a bit of a warning of impending doom (it starts making a funny noise, or bad sectors, etc) an SSD will just die."

I killed my tech-bench 840 EVO 512 just a few weeks ago. I'd say on /occasion/ you /could/ get some basic warnings. In my case data started to randomly disappear. Attempting to move files would result in errors for file not found or could not complete copy etc. Whether or not you'd see that on a normal drive in normal conditions is something I can't answer. But for a drive that's moving dozens to hundreds of gigs constantly killing off cells is expected and the warnings /were/ there.
Backups are priceless. Hope that helps shed light a bit.
As for this program; I'd always suggest you use the manufactures tools on something as important as monitoring firmware (board-level software). If you have an intel controller use intel. If you have marvell us their program. Samsung-Samsung. And so on.
I didn't download/try the software. As far as I'm concerned it's not worth playing in the fancy code of a SSD controller and changing settings independently.

Reply   |   Comment by John Clark  –  4 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+2)
#3

Installed on Win 10 but it wouldn't show any gui or other indication that it was running aside from the task manager so I rebooted, same thing. Now, I don't know about the Intel toolbox or this software that looks like it's intended for smaller compact computers (I have a luggable - ROG g74sx) so I don't know that either would or should work on this machine. Clarification would be cool for those that are new to the SSD arena.

Reply   |   Comment by Rick Carlson  –  4 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-8)

Read the System Requirements above. Windows 10 is not in the list of supported OS.

Reply   |   Comment by Tom Watson  –  4 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-1)

I have the Intel toolbox installed as I have a Intel SSD. It works well but only works on Intel SSD.

Reply   |   Comment by John  –  4 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+8)
#2

Well, it is of great importance to monitor the fragile ssd's, and there are lots of ways to do that. In fact, Windows has it as one of it's many hidden features. Just Google that one. However, Intel, has provided a Toolbox for monitoring and taking care of their products, and that makes me wonder, if yet a program like today's offer, will give me peace in mind. Actually, I have no idea - and if you're in the same situation, then try and read a bit in the following link, where Intel's Toolbox can be downloaded free of any charge. However, thanks a lot for the offer to BinarySense and of course the team behind GOTD.
Intel's Toolbox for monitoring and checking ssd's : https://downloadcenter.intel.com/download/18455/Intel-Solid-State-Drive-Toolbox

Reply   |   Comment by Allan  –  4 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+21)

Sorry for dupe posting, but I forgot to mention a link for freeware tools - just for bookmarking, if you miss or loose today's offer. Okay, very experienced users are better equipped, when it comes to determine,m when the ssd is running out of life. There are indeed programs written to help average users like my self to monitor and tell everything, you want to know about health and estimated remaining life of your ssd's. Happy spring with greetings from Denmark.

http://mashtips.com/ssd-health-test-and-performance-monitor-tools/

Reply   |   Comment by Allan  –  4 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+16)

But Intel's appears to be only for Intel SSD's.

Reply   |   Comment by Doug Jensen  –  4 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+3)

"Well, it is of great importance to monitor the fragile ssd’s"

Many [most?] people have had a USB stick &/or memory card [e.g. SD or microSD] just fail -- quit working for no apparent reason. SSDs are basically the same, perhaps more prone to sudden failure because there's more electronics included. Monitoring a SSD's health *may* give some warning. Frequent backups provide the only safety net.

Reply   |   Comment by mike  –  4 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+8)

this is better than intel tool box, this one actually has more info that i want, just sucks i cannot see more than 1 ssd.

Reply   |   Comment by frf  –  4 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+1)
#1

Also, it says they will offer various other licenses in a contest, but what license is being given away for free today? Is this another annual subscription program? I'm confuzled. :S

Reply   |   Comment by Jordan  –  4 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+14)

Jordan,

This is not a subscription. This is a lifetime license for this version of SSDLife for Ultrabooks.
However, it doesn't include any future version updates. If you want to receive updates, you can upgrade to any full version (Pro or Ultrabook) at any time with a 50% discount, just drop us a note.

Reply   |   Comment by SSDLife support  –  4 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+12)
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