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iResizer Giveaway
$39.99
EXPIRED

Giveaway of the day — iResizer

iResizer is a handy way to resize images non uniformly while preserving the key features of the picture.
$39.99 EXPIRED
User rating: 521 (54%) 435 (46%) 57 comments

iResizer was available as a giveaway on March 10, 2011!

Today Giveaway of the Day
$14.99
free today
Watermark photos and artworks by adding visual watermarks.

iResizer scales an image without changing important visual content such as people, buildings, animals, etc. While normal resizing affects all pixels uniformly when scaling an image, iResizer resizing mostly affects pixels in areas that do not have important visual content.

iResizer lets you shrink or enlarge images to improve a composition, fit a layout, or change the orientation. It is a handy way to resize images non uniformly while preserving the key features of the picture.

You can mark important elements in the image using green marker, this technique is handy if you have areas of the image that you want to retain at the expense of other areas and it can be used to protect people in the image as well. You can also use red marker to select which features of the image should be discarded.

You can find a Video Guide here.

System Requirements:

Windows 2000 and higher; 2000 MHz processor; 256 MB RAM

Publisher:

TeoreX

Homepage:

http://www.iresizer.com/index.html

File Size:

3.10 MB

Price:

$39.99

Comments on iResizer

57 comments
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Just in case anyone missed this GiveAway I have found a similar tool for free: VSO Magic Resize

http://forums.vso-software.fr/seam-carving-free-download-software-and-demos-t9800.html

Reply   |   Comment by Iberg  –  5 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+2)

You have to try it to know its uniqueness. This is not just a plain resizer which resizes a picture, but let you choose which to keep and even which to eliminate in the final resized picture. Very useful when you have too much space between images in a picture, and you would like to eliminate the big space between them. In answer to #12, cropping a picture is not the same, Here, you will be able to choose which part to resize, which part not to resize, and which part to eliminate in the final resized product. While cropping only chooses any part of the picture, all in proportion with the original.
One improvement can be made though, if there is an eraser available to erase any error in painting either green or red.
Very good and innovative software, with almost no learning curve required to immediately use it proficiently. This is definitely a keepr for me.

Reply   |   Comment by Andrew  –  5 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+4)

@ #7. Beth, the program you are looking for was a GOTD offering on February 9th, 2008. Its called Reshade Image Enlarger and it uses an advanced algorithm that doesn't compromize as to what data is important in the original photo. It meets the needs of "Scientists requiring image scaling without any detail loss, uses in space technology, security, medical, forensics and other applications." There is also a free Web based version available.
All information can be can be obtained at:

http://reshade.com/product/stand-alone

Reshade Online is at:

www.reshade.com

Reply   |   Comment by Hawk  –  5 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+5)

An actual help file for offline use would be welcome. And the online help is inadequate. Also rectangular select and flood with red or green would make it easier with some subjects. A menu for standard sizes by pixel count to save to and numerical degree of compression would help.

Reply   |   Comment by tswill  –  5 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+3)

Can this be installed and activated on a computer that is not connected to the internet? I only use my laptop for internet and my desktop for photo work so I want it on my desktop.

Reply   |   Comment by Joe  –  5 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (0)

note: Wouldn't activate. Strange, never had that problem before.

Installed just fine, Uninstalled because of Activation Fail.
For the short time I tried it, it seemed not to want to resize over and over whenever I tried the masks, My over all opinion is perhaps this program needs more work. Seems like there should be an easier way to fail, or to default to something that doesn't have a pop up each time.

I remember a JAVA based program that used to squeeze and stretch and mask photos once, it was pretty useful, you could remove telephone poles and their wires for example. It was free online using JAVA. However I have uninstalled JAVE recently, and so I will keep an eye out for an alternative. Thought this might have been the one, but nope.

I am forced sadly to vote this one down. Sounds like various people had differing results with success here.

Test Box: XP Sp3 Updated March 8th / Secunia 100%

Reply   |   Comment by TrialByFire  –  5 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-2)

I'm downloading this because I can always use a program like this to easily remove unwanted objects in my pics. Up till now, I have been doing very time-consuming copying of small areas of the background and pasting them over the object. This looks great!

Reply   |   Comment by Moosie  –  5 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-3)

@45. - Try http://liquidrescale.wikidot.com/

Reply   |   Comment by Joern  –  5 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+6)

The program doesn't seem to handle certain scenarios well. When for instance the protected object is taller in pixels than the new reduced vertical size (or close to it) the object is not resized proportionally but gets deformed. This seems partially what caused the deformation of Dember's poor little doggie. Partially because it also seems that the green grass was also protected from being squished and therefore the total height of the protected area was too large for the program to handle properly resulting in the 'Siddifying' effect. So green areas seems to pose a problem for the program too.

Also when you select an area to remove and resize only a few pixels the object remains when I would have expected a content aware fill effect.

It would also be useful and convenient if the program could perform regular resizing and cropping too to manipulate the end result.

Reply   |   Comment by Ben  –  5 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+5)

@ #24 - same problem, added to DEP list with no difference, still crashes. Guess I'll have to pass on this one.

Reply   |   Comment by Brian E.  –  5 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-4)

Another commercial application that does a similar job (and possibly predates today's product) is ReAspect from MediaChance. A discussion on its uses is posted here:
http://mediachance.com/dvdlab/reaspect.html
I'm quite happy with the Teorex iResizer giveaway because it is effective on its own — and increases in flexibility when combined with a heavy-weight bitmap editor.
Testing... a compressed backdrop, then an expanded backdrop. See?

Reply   |   Comment by tuna  –  5 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+3)

installed ok on 32bit vista home premium sp2 4gig ram, but crashed when it was part way though processing on the image I tried.

Reply   |   Comment by TK  –  5 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-5)

@ #1 lylejk: Could not find any reference in GIMP about the existance of LqR filter or any way to get it or use it. Could you be kind enough to provide additional info? Will be much appreciated, thanks

Reply   |   Comment by oldtimer  –  5 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+1)

@Dember (#18):

The mechanism is clearly some kind of clonemechanism where the red selections are filled with its surroundings and the green selections are far less subject to scaling. Try to keep that in mind whenever you do the selections for the best result.

The cloning aspect shows very clear in my redo of your sample with dog
http://www0.xup.in/exec/ximg.php?fid=16550177

Reply   |   Comment by Zen`-'_  –  5 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (0)

@21 Mike

Thanks, I already had the official version of "Windows Install Cleanup" installed and what I neglected to mention was that the "Windows Installer" was asking for the installation disc for Windows Journal Viewer. So, I deleted the records for that and magically ( so to speak), iResizer now works.
Thanks again.

Reply   |   Comment by Nigel  –  5 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+3)

Test image:
-face and hands highlighted, or not
-scaled double and half

www.wollinx.de/Benny/iResizerTests.png

Reply   |   Comment by W  –  5 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+5)

@Matt -- Oh god, I only just noticed your comment. xDD You have truly, -truly- made my day. Thank you so much for that, I'm going to clean the soda off my screen and blow my nose now. That was epic.

Reply   |   Comment by Dember  –  5 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-3)

Most of the programs here have alternatives that are FREE. Personally, I only use portable apps, but you can find this type of software on the web for free. freewarefiles.com and portableapps.com has plenty of these resizers. sourceforge.net has some good ones, as well. Unless it is a well-know, expensive app, it is not worth hosing up your system to install it.

Reply   |   Comment by Sherry  –  5 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-5)

@Rissos -- Actually, I did indeed cover the entire dog in green. That was the exact result. What is the red even -for-?

@Fubar -- Yes, I will indeed stick with Cropping before I bother with this program. xDD Thanks much for resizing the photo for me, though. I appreciate that. c:

Reply   |   Comment by Dember  –  5 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-6)

#12: "Can someone tell me if there’s any advantage to using this tool instead of cropping an image around the content you want to keep?"

Maybe this will help?...
Movies are shot [& many people prefer to watch them] wide-screen, because it's felt that the extra background helps convey the entire scene, maybe does a better job of pulling you into the picture. To show the same movie on regular TV they often just cut the sides off [cropping], & while certainly you still see the actors & whatever's going on, many feel that something irreplaceable has been lost in the process. Sometimes the same thing happens with still images...

If you've got a portrait or take a snapshot of people posing for the camera, they're the focus & things probably should stay that way -- very often too much of anything else in the picture is a distraction. And normally you'd want to crop the image as much as practical, showing only enough background to set the scene [if/when there is a scene to set]. Here you might use iResize if you don't have access to the original, & what you do have can't fill the width of whatever screen, e.g. making a 4:3 picture better fit a 16:9 HDTV.

The 2nd scenario [better fitting the wide screen movie example I started out with] has a background scene or setting that is important. Trying out iResize, a couple images on my hard drive worked really well... Both nighttime pictures were taken at Disney's X-mas party [Orlando], & the 1st shows a spotlit candy cane made out of balloons. Regular cropping &/or resizing added nothing at all, & while it was maybe a nice enough snapshot, unless you remembered the night it was taken it was a bit of a yawn. Highlighting the candy cane to protect it, reducing height in iResize the pic went through a metamorphosis -- the image went from being: "look what someone clever did with balloons", to "this was what it was like to be there that night". The 2nd image was a bit trickier, showing a well-lit building in the distance, with the shot framed by leaves & branches from trees close by. A nice shot, except the building was just a tad too small -- there was too much dark space, with nothing happening between the tree branches & the building itself. Here the building was protected & so in effect zoomed in or enlarged without losing the tree branches that made such a classic frame.

Google/Bing & you'll come up with other, perhaps better examples, but hopefully that gives a sense of how iResize might help out, &/or where it won't.

Reply   |   Comment by mike  –  5 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+15)

I have been reading the comments this morning and well..Thanks for making me laugh with some of the samples that were linked. So I gave it a try my self..interesting yes, entertaining yes, some thing I would use every day..No, but will enjoy playing with it.

On the other hand you can make it work really well if you take your time and pay attention to what you are doing.
Thanks GOTD & TeoreX
(oh ya, Thanks #18 Dember , coffee really burns when it shoots out your nose from laughing, have that poor little pup looked at.lol great after photo)

Reply   |   Comment by Rob  –  5 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+5)

Seems a little unpredictable... followed #32's suggestion and made some caricatures - quite excellent for that! Slightly cubistic, disproportionate versions of all your pictures if you highlight the important features of a face.

On a side note - the algorithm does a lot of its own work - I resized an unmarked picture and it still tried its best to maintain important parts (turned out quite bizarre, though).

Reply   |   Comment by W  –  5 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+2)

#18 --- You created Sid from Ice Age. What's the problem? :)

Reply   |   Comment by Matt  –  5 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-2)

I downloaded and installed no problems. I have used this on two separate pictures and the result was completely distorted for both. I was careful to set the reduction to retain the original aspect ratio, even though there is no option to keep it automatically. I watched the demonstration video and noted that the reduction was to a different ratio size yet there was no distortion. I thought this would be really useful to me but it simply does not work (for me).

Reply   |   Comment by Bernie`  –  5 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-7)

iResize can work very well with the right images performing the right tasks. If you feed it the wrong image & ask it to drastically reduce the total frame size you can get odd or even bizarre results. One scenario where it seems particularly well suited is for converting 4:3 images to 16:9, so those folks preparing slideshows &/or DVD/BD menus using 4:3 stills might be very pleased. Like Inpaint, iResize may strike some as bare-bones, without a lot of buttons or settings & a GUI that would've been at home in win98 -- to others that won't matter. The two complaints that I have personally are: images are opened full size instead of being reduced when necessary to fit in the window, & there are no Percentage readings -- I found this particularly odd when setting saved jpeg quality. I was also mildly perturbed that .tif files are not supported, but oh well.

Also like Inpaint, iResize is a compact, 1 file app that only uses the registry to store your key -- it should work well in the portableapps.com format. FWIW Setup.exe uses InnoSetup, & as always it doesn't hurt to run Activate.exe as admin in Vista/7 to make sure the key gets written to the registry -- using the HKCU section of the registry, you might also want to run Activate.exe in all Windows profiles [if you've got more than one set up]. During conversion iResize used ~25% of an AMD quad more-or-less evenly distributed across 3 cores -- it also appeared to *barely* use my ATI graphics card, but oddly it also seems to conflict with the GPU-Z app I used to find that out... if GPU-Z was correct & the GPU was used, graphics hardware might help determine how fast/slow iResize works for you.

All in all I like iResize & will gladly keep it -- Thanks! :-) -- but then the way I work I'll use it in tandem with another graphics/image editing app, maybe several, making any shortcomings in iResize fairly minor & inconsequential. I do realize not everyone works that way -- those that prefer 1 do-everything app could easily find iResize too limiting.

Reply   |   Comment by mike  –  5 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+24)

What fun software..........
Installed on Windows 7 64bit and it works perfect.
I have many pictures that I use for our websites. And what is fun about it is that you can set the important parts of the picture....excuse me...LMAO...but anyways I set the ears and mouth as important and set to 800 by 600 for resize and man that was funnnnnnny...Talk about making caricatures from pictures. Too funny!

Reply   |   Comment by ezetarget  –  5 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+9)

This is a nifty program, like their InPaint. Install is easy, with clear options, & smooth on all my systems - xp to 7. It's basic, simple & quick. For that, it's great! Any editing more detailed will mean a more selective intense app. This one is a handy tool for the toolbox. Thanks GAOD

Reply   |   Comment by I Calypso  –  5 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+5)

#28, G, when scaling down (and maybe up, I didn't check) while keeping the original aspect ratio, iResizer can keep the selected portion of the image at original size.

Reply   |   Comment by Fubar  –  5 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+9)

InPaint works great and this tool, an image squasher, seems to work pretty fine too! Thanks GOTD!

Reply   |   Comment by Franklin Moore  –  5 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+1)

14.@wishlist: When resizing, have a tick-box so that you can scale. I.E. if you reduce an 3000×2000 to 2400 wide, the tick box will autocalculate the height to scale at 1600

If you preserve the aspect ratio you just need a regular image resizer, not a seam carver.

Reply   |   Comment by G  –  5 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+2)

#17, Dember, your comment is typical of people who don't even try to use a tool. Here's my attempt from your original photo of the iResized Dog. I don't know what size you were targeting, and cropping would be better for your case. What I did isn't great, but clearly better than not trying like you did.

#8, Ben, the Clear Selection button/menu entry will clear your selection, but all of them, not just the current.

Reply   |   Comment by Fubar  –  5 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+28)

Installed/activated easily on XP SP3 in my old Dell LT. I did a quick test on a picture with text. First just selecting the part of the image I wanted to perserve but the writing was messed up. Next selected the image and text I wanted perserved and worked perfect with ease. I will definitely have to play with this one some more but it looks like nice useful software to add to my image editing tool box. Thanks GAOTD and TEOREX.

Reply   |   Comment by aswegohomestead  –  5 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+8)

Nice, I've tried it on several pictures I have taken and it works quite well. I'm a little dissapointed that the video tutorials don't explain the picture must be zoomed out to see the whole thing, and you do have the ability to resize the cursor to preserve or erase objects. Even then I'd still give it 8.5 out of 10. TeoreX gets my vote for ease of use for sure.

Reply   |   Comment by Nicholi1120  –  5 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+7)

My first attempt at a resize had it crash when I pushed the resize button. I'll try again.

Reply   |   Comment by Ben  –  5 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-4)

@Dember - You clearly didn't protect the dog's head from being resized. Try again and post the results. But good job on showing samples.

Reply   |   Comment by Rissos  –  5 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+15)

One of the neat features which may go unnoticed if you don't watch the video, is the programs ability to remove unwanted objects simply by painting them.
The resulting picture is resized and objets removed seamlessly in one operation.
Worth keeping.

Reply   |   Comment by QA  –  5 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+20)

#7: "... Each time I click the icon on my desktop, windows installer runs asking for a disc for the msi file... "

This is a known problem that can happen when someone writes a bad Windows Installer routine, & it happened with an earlier installation you performed, not with today's GOTD. Very briefly what happens is Windows Installer's stored history prompts Windows to look for install files when it shouldn't. The fix *was* to download, install, & use a Microsoft app called "Windows Install Clean Up" that was originally developed for MS Office, but it's been pulled by Microsoft because of compatibility problems with 7. You should still be able to find it on-line, but as always with unofficial downloads, be careful to make sure it hasn't been altered/infected. You'll probably also want to back up or at least set a restore point, as this app has no idea what install went bad -- that's up to you to remember or guess, & you probably don't want to remove the installation records for everything you've added using Windows Installer.

Best luck :-)

Reply   |   Comment by mike  –  5 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+29)

A Software plus's resizeimages is a best free image resizer..

Reply   |   Comment by A.D.  –  5 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-20)

Google "Seam Carving" & you'll get hits for for this Wikipedia article: http://goo.gl/dmgtF along with sites offering apps, info on projects etc... Seam Carving tries to figure out what's important in an image (still or video), so that when the image is re-sized, the most important parts of the picture don't look distorted. Often examples will feature beach scenes, because as backgrounds all that sand & sky & water are ideal -- you can tell if a tree's too fat or skinny because you know what trees look like, but with a more-or-less featureless beach scene you, the viewer have no frames of reference to tell if the image has been altered or not. Originally thought of [& still pursued] as a way to shrink still images & video to fit smaller cell phone displays, screens that also may have a different aspect ratio than TVs & monitors, Seam Carving can also be used when you want to eliminate objects in a scene -- once you distinguish foreground objects from the background, you can stretch [&/or clone] the background to fill in the blanks, fill in the spaces where those foreground objects are now. Apps using Seam Carving can be written to use your hints in figuring out what's important, & that's where highlighting parts of an image that you want protected during a re-size come in. Object removal OTOH is trickier, because the background to be stretched [&/or cloned] isn't always the same [or even similar] on all sides of the object(s) you want to get rid of.

That said, Seam Carving is the process &/or theory to figure out what in an image is visually most important, is still new & evolving, & there's room for innovation, both implementing Seam Carving & manipulating an image once you've used Seam Carving to analyze it... as you'd expect, some apps or plug-ins may work better than others, & how well they work individually can depend on what you give them to work with & what you ask them to do. IMHO it's both impractical & unfair [to yourself & the dev] to say Seam Carving is Seam Carving so every app/plug-in using it must be the same. Maybe iResizer is better, maybe it's not, but there's only one way to tell, & that's to try it.

Totally FWIW I have several video, audio, & graphics apps, & when I don't like the results in 1, when I feel that they could be better I'll run a test in another app, & another etc. until I've gotten what I want -- or run out of apps. ;-)

Reply   |   Comment by mike  –  5 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+36)

Somehow, I just don't think this program works very well. :c
Original: http://i54.tinypic.com/k3acqw.jpg
iResizer'd: http://i55.tinypic.com/24xgz7n.png
You normally charge $40.00 for this?...

Reply   |   Comment by Dember  –  5 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+26)

From reading the comments, I'm not sure some people are getting the idea of what this program does that is unique from other resizers. While Batch Picture Resizer and Faststone Resizer will resize your picture to whatever size you want, this resizer can keep what you select the same size while resizing the rest of the picture. If you go to the link mentioned in Struan's comment (#2, first paragraph), you will better understand what this program does differently. I'm definitely going to give it a try!
Also, the top suggestion on how to improve iResizer suggests combining iResizer with InPaint - according to the aforementioned video link, it does!

Reply   |   Comment by Darkshades  –  5 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+26)

Interesting piece of software. When I first read the description and looked at the home page, I rather blew it off as - how silly, if I want to crop a photo and resize it, that's what I'll do. I know that if you change ratio of width/height it will make the picture look odd, at least compared to the original.

The first example on the video tutorial gave me the same impression. It looks like the process just does an auto crop keeping the part you highlight. Bleaaaaau, what a waste.

BUT! the second video example gave a different view. Highlight a bit in the middle in red and it auto-magically resizes the picture by taking out the red-highlighted sections stitching together other bits around it. Wow.

Yes, my photoshop and other digital imaging skills haven't extended into that arena, so it has impressed me. I think the home page and verbal description should better highlight this aspect of the resizing. Otherwise, folks like me who don't really pay attention to all the details (and constantly lose in the spot the differences in the 2 photos and rarely find Waldo), will not even look at the program.

A side point - it installed quickly and easily on my Win 7 64 Professional. The activation however was not at all smooth. At first I thought the problem was interference by Norton Internet Security as with some of the GAOTD offerings year or so ago. I turned off the AV, then the Firewall, then both (yikes!!!) and still not activation. Tryng to reach this site gave me "Error 502 Bad gateway." THis lasted for several minutes. After the site was reachable, activation was easy with both AV and firewall in place.

Thanks to the developer and GAOTD!

Reply   |   Comment by Thaibird  –  5 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+29)

@wishlist: When resizing, have a tick-box so that you can scale. I.E. if you reduce an 3000x2000 to 2400 wide, the tick box will autocalculate the height to scale at 1600

Reply   |   Comment by Cornflower  –  5 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+10)

It does its job very well! It is not another Irfanview, and Irfanview, my #1 tool, cannot do what iResizer can.

As long as you realize that it "squashes" the rest of the picture, it does what it says well, and in the two photos I've tried so far, excellently so.

Tip: remember distortion if you don't resize to scale. You may want to include that grain elevator in the background so it doesn't look "fat".

Reply   |   Comment by Cornflower  –  5 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+22)

This is an excellent standalone pic resizer (and re-composition) tool - well worth the download.

Reply   |   Comment by Andrew  –  5 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-16)

Can someone tell me if there's any advantage to using this tool instead of cropping an image around the content you want to keep?

Reply   |   Comment by Nancy  –  5 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-21)

Fun program, I really like the idea.
but since it doesn't help out with the aspect ratio the pics end up all distorted.

Still, a keeper :)

Reply   |   Comment by Marcus  –  5 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-13)

One more thing I forgot to mention.

In a photo I processed there was an area with text in it that I didn't mark. It seems as if the app 'protected' it from being deformed all by itself. I was rather surprised by that. Not sure whether it's a fluke or really something that happened 'by design'. If it did happen by design then the algorithm used apparently is indeed quite 'intelligent'.

Reply   |   Comment by Ben  –  5 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+21)

Funny little app. I'll have to do some more experimenting to see how useful it really can be for me. A few things that struck me so far.

- An erase button would be nice to undo accidental marking of an area.
- I expected to see image info in the status bar which isn't used at all.
- No numerical value of pixel width is indicated when changing the paint tool size with the slider. A few buttons with preset widths/shapes would be useful too.
- The quality setting while saving does not show a numerical value. I'd prefer it if it does.
- It wants to save a PNG (and any supported image format I expect) as a JPG by default although it does save it as a PNG once you change the extension. Changing the output by changing the extension is not ideal. Better have an 'Options' button with a window behind it where you can select image format and compression setting and whatever else would be convenient.

All in all not too bad for a version 1.0 but keep working on it.

Reply   |   Comment by Ben  –  5 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+37)

Win Xp SP3

Installed but will not run. Each time I click the icon on my desktop, windows installer runs asking for a disc for the msi file. A shame, I was looking forward to trying this out - Hopefully it will be pulled, or replaced when the GOTD team realize.

Reply   |   Comment by Nigel  –  5 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-6)
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