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IM-Magic Partition Resizer Pro 2.6.0 Giveaway
$49.99
EXPIRED

Giveaway of the day — IM-Magic Partition Resizer Pro 2.6.0

Resize partition spaces without reformatting disk and reinstalling OS!
$49.99 EXPIRED
User rating: 156 (75%) 53 (25%) 46 comments

IM-Magic Partition Resizer Pro 2.6.0 was available as a giveaway on January 27, 2016!

Today Giveaway of the Day
$39.99
free today
Privacy Protector for Windows 10 helps to cope with privacy problems.

Need to resize partition without reformatting disk? Try IM-Magic Partition Resizer Pro to resize partition spaces without reformatting disk, reinstalling OS, and don`t trouble yourself moving large data from one place to another. Partition Resizer Pro developed by IM-Magic Inc. is 100% safe for resizing, redistributing disk space, and has a very intuitive interface.

Please note: 10 users with the best improvement ideas will be rewarded with keys for IM-Magic Partition Resizer Pro Free Upgrades. Please use the Idea Informer Widget to submit your advice.

System Requirements:

Windows 2000/ XP/ Vista/ 7/ 8/ 10 (x32/x64); Hard Disk: at least 100 MB hard drive space; CPU: at least with X86 or compatible CPU with main frequency 500 MHz; RAM: minimum 512MB system memory

Publisher:

IM-Magic Inc.

Homepage:

http://www.resize-c.com/pro/

File Size:

8.31 MB

Price:

$49.99

Comments on IM-Magic Partition Resizer Pro 2.6.0

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#15

Do not partition your HDDs. It's not that hard to manage a single partition, even with a backup software. If you want more space, then get a bigger 2nd/3rd/etc. HDD. You don't gain any performance or ease-of-use by using multiple partitions on a single HDD. Needlessly partitioning your HDD or SSD can only cause problems.

Reply   |   Comment by steveju  –  Last year  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-5)
#14

errors out, doesnt run w7 x64

Reply   |   Comment by Andrew Polizia  –  Last year  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-3)
#13

Installed and registered with no problems. However, my MalwareBytes kicked-in and blocked a trojan in my temp folder. Aside from that, my OS drive (C) had roughly 2.5 GB free and my data drive (D) had 20 GB free. I was able to re-size D down by 8 GB and apply that reduction to my C drive. Now my C drive has 12 GB free. The interface is simple and clean, and the pre-boot resizing operation took under 5 minutes to complete. This reminds me of what Partition Magic used to do for me. The only thing that concerns me is the trojan that MWB detected, so I'd recommend having some sort of anti-virus/malware real-time protection enabled before proceeding with this giveaway. Other than the trojan scare, I'm impressed with the results.

Reply   |   Comment by Justin Alias  –  Last year  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-2)
#12

Wow! Great easy to use program! I was able to move disk space on my HD that no other partition progs were able to do. Even my IT guy was able to do it simply, but this program did.

Reply   |   Comment by Vincent  –  Last year  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-11)
#11

Why you may want to grab IM-Magic Partition Resizer Pro.

If you're running 7 on a MBR hard drive you likely have a hidden partition with some boot files & the system partition where Windows lives. In that case you can partition your drive once when you set it up, & done -- it's not even necessary to know what you'll put on what partition initially, dividing the drive into easily managed chunks or portions that you can fill up later on.

With 8/8.1 things got more complicated... The recommended setup was to use a GPT disk [rather than MBR], which uses a hidden partition for the drive tables that a MBR disk stores on a very small, hidden portion of the drive storage area. There might be a hidden partition for Microsoft files [like the stuff for BitLocker], a recovery partition where Windows setup files were stored, & a manufacturer might add one or two partitions, &/or use the recovery partition. 3rd party software, installed by you or the manufacturer, might also create a hidden partition to store backup data.

If that wasn't already enough of a mess, along comes Windows 10. Much like 8, by default installation gives you 4 partitions [boot files, Microsoft, system, &recovery] -- 5 if you count the GPT partition, which may or may not show up in your partitioning or backup software. So how did 10 complicate things, since that looks the same as Windows 8/8.1?...

Major updates in 10 [like November, 2015's v.1511] reinstall or replace the existing 10 installation rather than patch it. And since that Recovery partition may include non-Microsoft stuff, that *may* create another Recovery partition. It's possible that you can have extra partitions if you're trying a fresh install over an existing 10 install without wiping the disk -- newer versions of win10 add partitions in a different order. You may also have problems with the partition holding the boot files, e.g. the update may not properly install saying that partition's too small [whether it is or isn't], or may screw up those files. Worse, if you have Windows 10 Home, if that update doesn't work, soon after it reverts back to your old installation, it'll try & install the update all over again.

Now partition software won't solve all those potential woes, but it helps. You likely will need to use Windows DiskPart to add a driver letter to hidden partitions to work with them -- something I'd sure like to see partitioning apps add to their capabilities -- but once that's done you can usually work with them. And you will need a partitioning app if you want to reclaim the space from an old unused partitions. I've also seen backup software that when you restore a full disk backup image add tiny partitions between the main partitions that you want/need.

Why more than one partition app?... One, you never know when a Windows change [update] will break a partition app. Two, some giveaway apps lose their activation -- I've had this happen with EaseUS & AOMEI. Three, while I've had the first two happen with 7, if you update 10 to a new version, there's no guarantee Any software will keep it's activation.

Reply   |   Comment by mike  –  Last year  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+31)
#10

Kaspersky Internet Security 2016 Says this program include PDM:Trojan.WIN32.GENERIC end delete IM-Magic Partition Resizer Server.

Reply   |   Comment by Raimucka  –  Last year  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+5)

Raimucka
That is "GENERIC" because it is an installer being mistaken for a virus, because the code is close to but not a virus. It is a simple false positive. If it were a known virus, it would not state GENERIC. I would bet AVG states the same thing because of the way they work.

Reply   |   Comment by Glen C  –  Last year  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+5)
#9

I like AOMEI for Windows and GParted for Linux. I'm not too excited about any partition resizer that states it is 100 percent safe, as everyone that does a lot of work with partitions knows is not always the case. For that reason, I'll pass.

Reply   |   Comment by Glen C  –  Last year  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+5)

Glen C
I'm never had any problems with any of the partioning software I've used over the years.

Reply   |   Comment by Roger  –  Last year  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-6)
#8

On the homepage of the program, this program is listed only for Window 8 or below. Windows 10 is missing

Reply   |   Comment by Ritchi  –  Last year  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+6)

Ritchi
its only an old website. I tried the pro program from their homepage and it works under Windows 10 64bit as well

Reply   |   Comment by Ritchi  –  Last year  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+6)
#7

This one is ok, but I way prefer and will stick with, Parted Magic, which is Linux based, bootable, has about a 100 tools, including GParted, and is extremely reliable. The Live operation (Disk or USB) is a major plus. Thanks, GOTD, but I'll stick with PMagic.

Reply   |   Comment by Mike OD  –  Last year  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+8)

Mike OD
PMagic is no longer free!

Reply   |   Comment by Glen  –  Last year  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+12)

Glen
You can get it for free here:
http://www.majorgeeks.com/files/details/parted_magic.html

Reply   |   Comment by consuella  –  Last year  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+3)

consuella
Hi!
The link did not take me to a page where PMagic appears....:-(.... It went to a 810 page list of apps.....

Reply   |   Comment by janet  –  Last year  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-2)

janet
try this link partition magic is listed there with others
http://www.majorgeeks.com/mg/sortdate/partitioning.html
or
partition magic old - windows (xp) think Norton took over so no freebie for the latest
http://www.majorgeeks.com/compatdb/details/partition_magic_5_windows.html

Reply   |   Comment by kis  –  Last year  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+3)

janet
http://www.majorgeeks.com/files/details/parted_magic.html

Reply   |   Comment by Mike OD  –  Last year  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-3)

janet
Try to copy the link from here, and then paste it into your browser. This should take you to the MajorGeeks website, and from there (majorgeeks) you can download a freeware version of Parted Magic.

Reply   |   Comment by consuella  –  Last year  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-3)

Mike OD
Here's the links -
http://www.majorgeeks.com/files/details/parted_magic.html
http://www.majorgeeks.com/mg/getmirror/parted_magic,1.html
http://www.majorgeeks.com/mg/getmirror/parted_magic,2.html
http://www.majorgeeks.com/index.php?ct=files&action=download&

Reply   |   Comment by Rob Down Under  –  Last year  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-3)
#6

Windows Storage Management is useful, until there are problems where the partition is not setup in the limited configurations or definition modes windows expects.

Win 2K allowed for larger FAT32 drives than WIn XP - on through the current win 10
Windows, through to 10 does not easily facilitate recovery of partitions where the partition table has been 'knackered'.

As stated - there is appropriately updated and capable software available free from major suppliers such as Paragon and EASEUS that not only does partition managements but will also do backups of the partitions so you have a recovery facility created before you start a partition change process, that may, if there are problems with the existing file and storage control tables, leave you with an unusable and unrecoverable partition content.

Re partitioning a drive - Yes - I would reccoment
A maintenance partition - OS partition backup and management software - no apps and no windows update.
A main OS partition - all your main apps and utilities - fixed size pagefile too - remember windows tends to almost hibernate' at closedown now.
A data partition - for your 'stuff' that is not multimedia or bulky mostly read-only files - backed-up daily, and to cloud too so you can get it down onto a new system.
A bulk storage partition - stuff you can re-acquire

And - you will need a second drive for backups - well 2 to be alternated because your system failure is likely to happen when you are refreshing your backup.

And - re win 3.1 and 95, for me much more stable than win 10 has been so far!

Reply   |   Comment by jamies  –  Last year  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-2)

jamies
Besides you do not comment on the offered software, you do point the correct way to go.

I use different partitions for different stuff for a long time and is very easy to port my data to another disk/machine.

And yes, it's important to use more than one media for backups, as Murphy Law's 2K says: a backup fails the moment you need to it!

Reply   |   Comment by Bat  –  Last year  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+6)

jamies
"Windows Storage Management is useful, until there are problems..."

If it helps at all, jamies...
Hopefully this will change in the future -- sooner rather than later -- as Microsoft releases more of the tech it's been working for years. Some of this is starting to slowly show up with their new server & Azure stuff, & [IMHO too] slowly making it's way to win10.

"Windows, through to 10 does not easily facilitate recovery of partitions where the partition table has been 'knackered'."

Paragon backup apps can separately backup the MBR, which is useful, several partition apps can rebuild partition tables, which can work, & when the partition is in good enough shape that you can copy it with a partition app, those tables, along with NTFS tables will be recreated.

"remember windows tends to almost hibernate' at closedown now"

Again in case it helps... from a command prompt running as admin [type cmd in search & run the result as admin in 7, or just right click the Start Button in 10], "powercfg /h off" [w/out quotes] turns off hibernation [not sleep] & deletes the large storage file.

"And - you will need a second drive for backups - well 2 to be alternated because your system failure is likely to happen when you are refreshing your backup."

Storing backups on a 2nd drive in the PC case is nice & convenient. Having one or more external drives can help too, but bear in mind the need for cooling, which most external housings don't have. A drive dock with a small, separate fan is an inexpensive alternative. USB 2 & 3 can be flaky, particularly outside of Windows, e.g. when restoring a backup after booting to a USB stick/CD/DVD, so it's important to test your setup, or go with eSATA. Storing backups on Blu-Ray discs is cost effective, but longevity of the discs you burn can be questionable. One of the more bulletproof solutions is a drive housing or NAS with 2 drives set up for RAID mirroring, where your backup is written to 2 hard drives at the same time, so if one fails, you have the other. That all said, the only failures I've ever had backing up a disk/partition image or restoring one has been related to flaky USB circuitry.

"And - re win 3.1 and 95, for me much more stable than win 10 has been so far!"

I haven't had any problems with several win10 installations -- I've got a dozen. Do be sure to check & make sure you can boot to your backup & partitioning software before you have to rely on it -- it can be iffy with more current devices or systems. And do be aware that if you're running 10 it is a bit different, & not all software will get all the partitions right if you use a GPT disk [which is recommended], so that win10 will boot -- the only backup software that will work 100% with the full HDD in my testing is Macrium Reflect [there's a free version]. I have a few partitions with different versions of Windows [including 10] on the main HDD in this rig, & Paragon, as well as IM-Magic Partition Resizer Pro, have worked fine with individual partitions.

There are solutions to most every problem you might encounter with 10's partitions on a GPT disk, but it can get rather technical or geeky, & in any case is too involved for an already overlong comment. If interested or as needed research DiskPart, BCDBoot, BCDEdit, & EasyBCD.

Reply   |   Comment by mike  –  Last year  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+4)

jamies
Later versions of windows DO allow FAT32 with greater partition size than 32GB BUT Microsoft disk managment tools will NOT create the larger than 32GB FAT32 partitions. You can use 3rd party partition managment tools to make any size FAT32 that will fit on your media as long as it is less than 2TB (I believe). I have a 1TB USB2.0 thumbdrive formatted as FAT32 that I use to enable PVR function on one of my Altius DTV with a USB socket, works just fine until the DTV firmware crashes and leaves FAT32 in an unfinished state, which is whiy FAT32 has been all but deprietiated out of existance by Microsoft.

Microsoft only support FAT32 for backwards compatability with all the mobile devices that use it. And Windows will read and write and repair FAT32 partitions greater than 32GB, they just won't create them.

My personsal view on partition resizing is it's not a job that is done often enough to warrant a one trick pony just for that! I've used Windows Vista disk managment to do it and there are 3rd party disk managment suites that do it, both online and offline... Personslly I would recomend doing partition managment of the OS system volume as an offline process and not online in a multi-tasking environment! With current complete image backups being available of course.

Reply   |   Comment by TK  –  Last year  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+9)

mike
Please state your facts in one paragraph instead of trying to write a novel.

Reply   |   Comment by Rock  –  Last year  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-8)
#5

Several years ago, partitioning tools were commercial software, and some were quite expensive. Recently companies like 'Aomei' and 'EaseUS' have given us free tools. This sector of the software industry is quite competitive.
Again, several years ago, most PCs had one hard drive (20 MB?) so partitions weren't strictly necessary. Some people liked a D drive for documents, E drive for games, F for movies, etc. As hard drive space has increased, and operating systems have got more 'closed' (most users shove files on their desktop or 'my documents') sectioning a disk into partitions has fallen by the wayside.
I would recommend most users should partition their drives into at least two partitions - a system partition for the operating system (drive C) and documents (drive D). This allows the operating system to be backed up via partition imaging tools such as Aomei Backupper (excellent software) without the bloat of movies, downloads, etc, which would be backed up independently. Again, nothing much went wrong with Windows 3.1 or Windows 95. However, these days, a Windows Update can easily knobble a PC so regular backups are HIGHLY recommended.
So, every user should have a partition manager in their toolbox. Most are as good as each other - so long as you can cut a partition in half, merge partitions or move them, they are the key functions. The primary thing to look at is are the programs regularly updated? The 'big guns' like Aomei and EaseUS release new versions quite regularly to keep up with each other - they don't want to be left behind.
Todays software is free, so not to be sniffed at. IM is a good brand - not as low as 'Morning Flake' if you're looking at cereals, but not as good as 'Kelloggs'.

Reply   |   Comment by Chris Locke  –  Last year  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+20)

Chris Locke
No offense but to quote you "nothing much went wrong with Windows 3.1 or Windows 95" makes me think that maybe you never really ran those versions of windows. Windows 3.1 constantly needed rebooting anytime you tried to do much multitasking as it ran under DOS. Windows 95 was not much of an improvement.

Reply   |   Comment by ptyson  –  Last year  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+12)

ptyson
Rarely had problems with Windows 3.1 and if I did it was possible to repair without losing all the software on my machine, unlike everything since Windows 95.

In fact did my postgraduate work using 3.1 and never had to backup my system, only the work I was doing in the software.

The Windows registry destroyed this capability and rather than upgrade from XP I will probably go to Linux.

Reply   |   Comment by XP-Man  –  Last year  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+15)

ptyson
Chris
The BEST EVER THING WITH WIN95 is the startup sound ;)
I lovit !!!

Reply   |   Comment by unpeudepolitessesvp  –  Last year  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-17)

XP-Man
Consider Linux Mint Cinnamon. Been using it for about 2 years now and LOVE it!

Reply   |   Comment by George  –  Last year  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+3)

ptyson
My reference to those operating systems was in the context of the drives - to which this giveaway relates. Also, the operating systems for 3.1 and '95 were much more 'robust' in that an update for one component wouldn't impact much else, and it was easy to recover from any calamity. In Windows 7/8/10, its very easy for a Windows Update to make the OS unbootable.
Yes, I have run those versions of Windows. I've been in IT for over 26 years.

Reply   |   Comment by Chris Locke  –  Last year  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+9)

George
Better yet, Slackware is great. I've been using it since I was a youngster (94) and its got old with me. Always works great and us Linux kiddos know too well about gparted and other "affordable" software.

Reply   |   Comment by Wilson_74  –  Last year  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+3)

Chris Locke
"I would recommend most users should partition their drives into at least two partitions - a system partition for the operating system (drive C) and documents (drive D). This allows the operating system to be backed up via partition imaging tools"

Where do you recommend we put programs? I was thinking, like for GAOTD programs, you'd want them in drive C with the OS because the images would have the licensed versions. Should just GAOTD and frequently-used programs be put on C, which you'd image often? Or all programs? Or am I wrong and programs should be on the non-imaged partition (D, Documents)?

Thanks.

Reply   |   Comment by Joe T.  –  Last year  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-1)

Joe T.
All programs should be installed on the C (system) partition. They would get backed up and imaged when you image the whole system.
If you've downloaded the .ZIP from here (which 9 times out of 10 can be deleted after installation) then *that* would go on the D drive (documents). All files you've downloaded would go on the D drive , but would be installed on the C drive.

Reply   |   Comment by Chris Locke  –  Last year  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+1)

George, Wilson_74
Thanks for the suggestions at the moment I'm working through various versions, but at the moment testing PCLINUX the full Monty as it comes with many programs suitable for the OS, a four gig download.

Joe T..
Find it best to minimise the size of the C partition which I backup quite regularly; a small size makes it easy to scan for problems and to backup, plus it is the most likely area to fail.
Programs in another partition and large files such as BBC I player downloads in another.
Only occasionally backup the programs partition but never bother to backup the BBC videos.
This works well for me.

Reply   |   Comment by XP-Man  –  Last year  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+4)

XP-Man
"rather than upgrade from XP I will probably go to Linux". That´s ok, but don´t wait to long in buying hardware: Microsoft has made contracts with hardware manufacturers to only support windows10! That could mean that Linux won´t run on newer processors/platforms. It seems the latest processor serie to run other operating systems than windows 10 is Broadwell. Even the current Skylake generation will only support windows 10 as of now. Yes, it is crazy, hardware manufacturers have embraced this idea however. Microsoft got big because of compatibility; Microsoft keep shooting themselves in the foot.

Reply   |   Comment by Calimero  –  Last year  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-1)

Chris Locke
"I would recommend most users should partition their drives into at least two partitions"

Something that might interest a few, like Whiterabbit [the GOTD games mod] I try to isolate all the games on my wife's PC. When I recently added 10 to her PC, in addition to the 7 she's been using, I made sure that the partition with the games had the same drive letter that it did in 7... Copied the shortcuts en masse from 7 to 10, and done.

Reply   |   Comment by mike  –  Last year  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+3)

Joe T.
If I were optimising my C: drive to remove user installed things but wanted things to *look* normal I'd assign C:\Program Files to its own NTFS partition, I'd do the same with C:\Users and C:\ProgramData. It would take some massaging and offline renaming of folders to achieve but would leave just the OS and mostly static files in the OS partition, baring the registry, windows\temp and pagefile which really need to be there.

replace C:\users with C:\Documents and Settings folder names and it will work for XP and win 2K too.

NOTE if you try this idea and miss the recycle bin in the re-assigned folders you just need to assign real drive letters to the partitions in addition to the folder names.
You will then also be able to access the partitions via the new drive letters or the C:\ folder hierachy too.

Reply   |   Comment by TK  –  Last year  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+3)

Calimero

By "hardware manufacturers", you mean Intel, right?

If what you say is true, it's time to buy AMD stock.

But it's unlikely the American FTC would allow such a monopolistic move by Microsoft, no matter how many lobbyists they own.

Reply   |   Comment by DD  –  Last year  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (0)

Calimero
Yes I saw this information and that is a reason I'm dumping Microsoft, not being held to ransom by them!

Quite frankly I don't think they have still got the clout to make it stick as so many systems rely on Linux and UNIX.

Although I still run XP I do it on a really powerful machine, so at 73 it is probably going to last longer than me. :-)

Reply   |   Comment by XP-Man  –  Last year  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (0)

TK, Chris Locke, XP-Man
Thanks to you all for your helpful answers. Now I feel prepared for my first build.

Reply   |   Comment by Joe T.  –  Last year  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+2)
#4

I've used various free and paid partition managers over the years in Windows and Linux. Many free partition manager can do the same as today's giveaway. Some of them even provide more functions than today's giveaway. I will stick with what works for me as well as is free forever, not only free today. My top 2 choice are:
#1 AOMEI Partition Manager Free: http://www.disk-partition.com/free-partition-manager.html
#2 GParted: http://gparted.org

Reply   |   Comment by Zbigniew  –  Last year  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+39)
#3

Windows has its own Partition Software, so its useless

Reply   |   Comment by rewgerg  –  Last year  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-29)

rewgerg
It's not if you need to resize a woring partition or merge 2 where there's data in between. Windows cannot do that

Reply   |   Comment by MM  –  Last year  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+20)

MM
*wrong partition*

Reply   |   Comment by MM  –  Last year  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-2)
#2

Quick and easy installation and registration, on opening presents a nice clean interface.

Looks like they tried to make an easy-to-use program rather than packet it full of features I would expect in a professional version.
In this respect it doesn't compare well with MiniTool Partition Wizard Pro given away here sometime ago, it has more useful functions with more information in the interface.
A rather highly priced program; have patitioned many hard drives using free programs without any difficulty or problems.
I'll stick with MiniTool Partition Wizard Pro and if I lose that I'll go to a free version, uninstalled.

Reply   |   Comment by XP-Man  –  Last year  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+14)
#1

I already had this as I got the same version as a giveaway a few months.

It works as stated, but you can do a lot more with other patitioning software, e.g. from EaseUS of AOMEI. As a result you might want to give this is a miss, if you've already got some partioning software installed.

Reply   |   Comment by Roger  –  Last year  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+31)
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