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Aiseesoft Blu-ray Creator 1.0.8 Giveaway
$39.95
EXPIRED

Giveaway of the day — Aiseesoft Blu-ray Creator 1.0.8

Aiseesoft Blu-ray Creator allows you to create Blu-ray disc out from any video you have.
$39.95 EXPIRED
User rating: 934 (73%) 349 (27%) 30 comments

Aiseesoft Blu-ray Creator 1.0.8 was available as a giveaway on January 17, 2014!

Today Giveaway of the Day
$19.50
free today
Spot potential problems before they result in an irrecoverable data loss.

Aiseesoft Blu-ray Creator is one of the best Blu-ray creating software. It can burn any video file to Blu-ray Disc (BD 25 and BD 50), Blu-ray Folder and Blu-ray ISO file. Users can easily customize the audio track, subtitle (SRT, SSA and ASS format) and the menu by themselves. To speed up the conversion, Aiseesoft provides Intel, CUDA and AMD three kinds of acceleration method. So you don’t need to worry about the time.

With this Blu-ray Creator software, you can easily make you own Blu-ray movies and play them on PS3, Sony BDP-S5, Samsung BD-F, LG Electronics BP, and many other Blu-ray players.

Additional event:
Aiseesoft provides 50% off coupon code: AISESZFP (apply to recommended products and other products) for all GOTD users.

System Requirements:

Windows 8, 7, Vista, XP; Processor: 1GHz Intel/AMD CPU or above; RAM: 1G RAM or more

Publisher:

Aiseesoft Studio

Homepage:

http://www.aiseesoft.com/blu-ray-creator/

File Size:

49.1 MB

Price:

$39.95

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Comments on Aiseesoft Blu-ray Creator 1.0.8

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#30

Reply to 12
What matters is the quality of the original video. Quality of “standard definition” of 720×480 remains the same even if it is converted to 1920×1024 resolution.

Reply   |   Comment by kdp  –  5 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (0)
#29

Blu-Ray is a dismal failure.

http://pjmedia.com/lifestyle/2013/06/28/why-blu-ray-failed/

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2169223/Are-expensive-Blu-Ray-discs-flop-39-tell-difference-hi-def-new-video-discs-old-DVDs.html

http://www.stolendroids.com/blu-ray-drm-is-an-utter-failure/


http://technologizer.com/2011/06/09/the-blu-ray-cup-is-fifteen-percent-full/

http://www.which.co.uk/technology/tv-and-dvd/guides/blu-ray-disc-quality/blu-ray-versus-dvd-/

Reply   |   Comment by ric  –  5 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+2)
#28

@ GAOTD Team

Thanks for offering this software, I was probably hoping you'd do exactly that. Installed and working just fine, it seems.

@ mario

Thanks for the info, that's really helpful. I probably would have overlooked the option entirely if you hadn't mentioned it.

@ KP

Well, John's comment seems to provide answer(s) to your question, although I believe the maximum resolution for Blu-ray is 1920x1080.
With Blu-ray you can achieve directly – or near that – pristine quality in Full-HD. To me, Avatar has proven that. You're likely to be able to play the disc(s) (if you make any) on every fully operational Blu-ray player out there, and with the program being a giveaway, you don't have to pay anything to use it.
The program can make ISO files (as mentioned by John), and also Blu-ray folders, which should be playable by e.g. the VLC media player. With ~50Gb discs supported, you should be able to fit over two hours of video on a single disc, with very high bitrate overall.
The Blu-ray creator offered here today has 35 Mbits as its maximum bitrate for video, and I believe that will be good enough. Both MPEG-2 and, more importantly, H.264 encoding is available. Both NTSC and PAL are supported as well. For audio, you can choose AC3 or PCM.
Through the use of certain 3D software solutions, like Bryce and LightWave 3D, you can make your own movies in Full-HD, and burning such movies on Blu-ray will let you watch them on a HDTV with HDMI input, given all components work sufficiently of course. If I'm correct, audio on Blu-ray can be better than on DVD. And, if you choose BD-RE discs to burn the movie(s) on, possible errors occuring
during the burning process should not render the discs useless at first, since you can theoretically write to the discs several times.
Video discs are portable, and that's likely to be considered a good thing. And, at least in Norway, Blu-ray discs aren't necessarily so expensive now. Buying a 64GB memorystick will probably cost you more.
In case you're not interested in video and audio quality, I've probably not got much to tell you that's likely to make you interested in making video Blu-ray discs. There's even a chance you already know most I've mentioned above, so it has perhaps not been enlightening at all. I hope you'll consider this an appropriate response (if you read it) – it has taken some time to write it.


In general:
I'm not sure the English contained in this message is 100% correct, but I do believe you'll understand its contents well enough.

Reply   |   Comment by Per Einar  –  5 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+1)
#27

I hate to tell you guys...But BR burners do not come with software

Reply   |   Comment by Steve dickson  –  5 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (0)
#26

TechPundit #20

Thank you for the advise. I will make a point of checking the folder or file(s) size before trying to burn it to a disk.

Reply   |   Comment by Webfan  –  5 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (0)
#25

#4: "I mean why one should burn a video file in blu-ray format?"
#5: "But where do you burn the Disc?? With the normal CD/DVD burner????"

One advantage of the Blu-Ray disc format is it's playable in most any stand-alone Blu-Ray player, even burned to a DVD using a normal DVD burner. Consider that it's a better value today to buy a Blu-Ray player, even if you intend to use it mostly with your DVD collection. Use the Blu-Ray format rather than DVD video format & you can use the more efficient AVC encoding for a better picture, whether you're watching on a HDTV or a standard TV. My son's used a Blu-Ray player for years with his regular TV because it was cheaper than a Roku for Netflix & also played his DVDs.

As opposed to a .mp4 or mkv video file encoded with AVC [or mpg2], you might gain some options in terms of players, handling multiple switchable audio & sub tracks, chapters etc. When you consider it's pretty much the same file in a mkv container or Blu-Ray folder layout, there may be little reason not to use the Blu-Ray setup. Myself, say I've got a recording from something like a Xmas special that was broadcast in HD... I can re-encode it to Blu-Ray spec AVC, create a Blu-Ray layout I'll use with the players, &/or stick the same AVC video into a .mp4 file container for my tablet without re-encoding anything. That's not to say the Blu-Ray format is ideal for everyone, but it's something I think most people would be well off considering.

* * *

#8: "Can the video be put on a usb thumb drive and plugged directly into a “smart TV” instead of using a blue ray disc?"

Depends on the hardware whether it'll play it or not, though you'll lose any menus. Often you want to select the BDMV folder, though you'll find the video in the BDMV\ Stream folder. MakeMKV will put the audio, video, & sub streams from a Blu-Ray layout into an mkv container pretty painlessly. There are plenty of other tools to stick AVC video into an .mp4 file, which some players may prefer. Maybe Watch your bit rate though -- a Lot of hardware media players, whether stand-alone or built into a HDTV will not handle anything close to Blu-Ray bit rates of 20 or better.

* * *

#11: " A common misconception is that DVDs contain High Definition video... BDR discs ... use better methods of compression."

Not disagreeing, but for clarification...

Blu-Ray on DVD uses HD video -- same AVC compression but more of it. The same mpg2 compression used on a DVD however can do a great job on Blu-Ray when you use Blu-Ray bit rates of 20 or more -- I doubt too many people [if any] could tell the difference between that & AVC unless you had a really pristine source, e.g. from a higher end video cam. Why use mpg2? It's easier/faster to encode & later decode for playback.

"Yes, you need not only a Blu Ray burner, you need blank BDR discs. Both were very expensive when Blu Ray was introduced. Nowdays, you don’t spend much more than you would for a DVD burner and blank discs."

FWIW, DVD burner - $14-$15 -- BD burner ~$50. DVD blanks - Single Layer <$20 per 100 - Dual Layer ~$0.50 or a little less each - 25 GB BD from around $0.50 each on sale for cheap products, ~$1.00 each for higher quality. Note that there are lots of reports of cheapest BD losing data over a short period of time.

* * *

#13: "and since almost every current $40 DVD player automatically upgrades pictures to High Definition watching, why do we need to go to the trouble to make a BluRay-DVD that only BluRay payers can handle?"

You're right about upscaling video in software -- there's normally little if any reason for that. That's not to say what you'll watch is HD -- it's SD or whatever upscaled to fit the screen where you're watching it. If you use a magnifying glass to read a page out of a book, the text doesn't look any better, & in fact usually looks worse because the defects are magnified along with everything else -- if you read a large print edition instead, the letters are the same size as using the magnifying glass, but look much nicer. That's not to say a good HDTV won't do a nice job of enlarging the original, but if you can start with HD & keep it that way, do so because it has all the data, not just some of it.

DVD video is part of the Blu-Ray spec -- in fact if you buy a disc like the Princess Bride Blu-Ray the extra features are straight off a DVD. Want to store one disc instead of several? Add them to a Blu-Ray. You can also get nicer subs than watching a DVD on a HDTV, but that's a bit of work.

[BTW, purely FWIW, you're paying too much if you buy a DVD player for $40 -- you should be able to get a Blu-Ray player that also plays DVDs & has on-line features & plays video from USB for around $40-$50.]

* * *

#14: "Apparently cutting is not available according to screenshots on"

Yes, it can do that too.
However, just because of the nature of the beast so-to-speak, always test first with different video sources the 1st time you use video from a source you haven't tried before, especially if you're doing any joining to go along with that cutting. Anything other than uncompressed .wav audio [combined with video or not] can sometimes be a bit iffy. Video may be limited to the nearest keyframe, & video formats without much in the way of timing info like AVC can sometimes be questionable.

* * *

#16: "As been said if your viewing your video camera recordings on DVD then your missing out on the higher picture quality that most video cameras have to offer."

DVDs are limited to a bit rate about 9 Kbps -- USB [especially USB 3.0] is faster -- Blu-Ray can do 30-40 on a burned disc I think -- WiFi bandwidth of course varies. As far as any video goes, whether you shot it or not, the real question is whether you can handle it's bandwidth, i.e. bit rate. You can certainly have 1080p video at a bit rate low enough to work on a DVD, or standard sized 720 [or 640] x 480 [or 576] video that exceeds the DVD max bit rate.

[BTW that's why or how some really cheap cameras can shoot 1080 -- it's extremely highly compressed with a low bit rate. That's also how your cable provider likely sends you HD TV, at lower than DVD bit rates to save transmission bandwidth for all those PPV channels.]

* * *

#18: "I don’t have a blu-ray burner in my computer, but I am looking forward to getting one in the future. My object in doing this isn’t so much movies as it is to use the large capacity disks to archive more ordinary files such as documents, photographs, and similar. "

It's just like a higher capacity DVD, or MUCH higher capacity CD. Everything works the same -- if I use Nero Express or ImgBurn the only difference really is selecting the Blu-Ray drive & disc rather than DVD.

* * *

#14: "Normally blue-ray recorders come with appropriate software but I hope Aiseesoft Blu-ray Creator 1.0.8 got more functions."
#19: "I don’t need BR burning software because I have not bought nor installed one yet. When I do, I am sure they will have the proper software with it."

Actually no. At best, if you buy a retail as opposed to a [often much] cheaper OEM packaged drive [i.e. a plain box], you might get a cut down, very much reduced feature set app that's also often a few versions older than current. And then it might let you watch Blu-Ray movie discs, but usually nothing like authoring those discs with menus really.

Reply   |   Comment by mike  –  5 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+1)
#24

At the time of writing, there are 20 comments and 573 upvotes achieving an approvals ratio of 83%. The question to be asked isn't about the software but about the software publisher: when oh when is Aiseesoft ever going to learn that the stunts it repeatedly pulls -- and I do mean, repeatedly -- with vote rigging and vote manipulation are so blatantly obvious that no self-respecting computer user would want to go anywhere near them?

Thanks, GAOTD. But where Aiseesoft is concerned, absolutely no thanks.

Reply   |   Comment by MikeR  –  5 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (0)
#23

At last Aiseesoft has included Quick Sync Video encoding instead of the usual other two. Now i can free up space in my PC. Great news!

Reply   |   Comment by Frank  –  5 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (0)
#22

I think it's great that Aiseesoft decided to make Blu-Ray Creator -- when it comes to authoring Blu-Ray there aren't a lot of cheap, & really only 2 free choices, the tsMuxeR Beta [no menus] & multiAVCHD [no longer updated/supported & harder to use]. http://www.videohelp.com/tools/sections/authoring-bd-hd-dvd

That said, no even remotely affordable Blu-Ray authoring app will let you use or create the Java menus & such you'll see on a retail Blu-Ray movie disc, and the Aiseesoft Blu-ray Creator is not without issues, e.g. there's no provision to add or use chapters, which IMHO, unless you only play it on your PC, are critical if the video's over 5-10 minutes in length. [You *might* have success editing your Blu-Ray in multiAVCHD to add chapters, but that begs the question, if you're going to learn to use multiAVCHD, why would you need Aiseesoft Blu-ray Creator to start with?]

Missing chapters aside, Aiseesoft Blu-ray Creator is your basic ffmpeg-based video converter, with the encoder set up for Blu-Ray, [optional] basic menu creation, and the ability to add one or more separate audio & subtitle files [that last part is cool]. More menus are available free from Aiseesoft's site, and you can use your own pictures for the background & supply your own audio, but beyond that they're not that customizable, e.g. you can't move the buttons around. Most DVD & Blu-Ray authoring apps let you import your video & will use it without re-encoding -- with Aiseesoft Blu-ray Creator you will re-encode your video, period.

As far as the results go, they may or may not be Blu-Ray spec, & that may or may not matter. Generally the only way to tell is if the encoded video passes compliance checking, which is a step that's performed by the companies that actually make the Blu-Ray movie discs. The x264 AVC encoder that's included in ffmpeg is capable of producing Blu-Ray spec video [some retail movies have been encoded using it], but I don't see any way to tell if Aiseesoft Blu-ray Creator uses those x264 settings. All I can say for sure is that the AVC video it encodes is VBR [Variable Bit Rate -- Yeah!], & both Sony's DVDA & Nero 2014 Plat insist on re-encoding it, the same as they insist on re-encoding video that was encoded by x264 following the guidelines at http://www.x264bluray.com/home to create Blu-Ray compliant video. [The reason I mention that is in case anyone was thinking of using Aiseesoft Blu-ray Creator to (re)encode their video, importing it into another app for the Blu-Ray authoring part -- if that's what you're after test 1st.]

In theory every Blu-Ray player [hardware or software] should play Blu-Ray spec video on disc or hard drive. Most will play the almost identical AVCHD disc format. Many Blu-Ray players will switch to AVCHD playback mode if they detect anything out of Blu-Ray spec. Long story short, if you burn a Blu-Ray video disc, you can be more confident it will play if the software you used licenses & sticks to the Blu-Ray spec -- if you use something else, it'll *probably* work. Do test the disc you burned if it's the 1st time using whatever software, &/or if it's the 1st time using whatever brand of BD blank.

Importing files into Aiseesoft Blu-ray Creator worked fine. Setting the output was quick & easy, though I would prefer being able to enter your own bit rate rather than using presets, but that's a small price to pay for VBR output. It does not accept DTS audio if you were thinking of using Aiseesoft Blu-ray Creator to back up the Blu-Ray discs you've bought. Subs should be in the .srt text file format [Subtitle Edit can OCR graphics-based subs if needed], & like multiple audio tracks you can switch between different subs, or turn subs on/off during playback. Encoding can use Nvidia, Intel, or AMD graphics processors -- in tests neither Intel nor AMD showed any extra activity or had any positive effects on encoding times when activated. It was a bit unusual to see the first CPU core unchecked in preferences, but checking it I noticed Windows was sometimes unresponsive during encoding -- that's the first time I've seen all cores pegged with an i7, & the 1st time I've experienced that unresponsiveness in years. Also unusual, during encoding Aiseesoft Blu-ray Creator sometimes ran two parallel instances of its Convertor.exe. Encoding speed was about average -- maybe just a bit slower than I'd expect from a ffmpeg converter, but bear in mind there's more work going on, more stuff turned on in the x264 encoder settings to match specs.

I was surprised that Aiseesoft Blu-ray Creator lets you set 25 or 50 GB disc sizes, but not DVDs. Blu-Ray on DVD is part of the spec, somewhat popular, & can make decent practical sense in a home with more than one PC/laptop... Almost everything running Windows has a DVD drive & USB ports, but Blu-Ray drives are more expensive so not that common. Blu-Ray on DVD uses the same format [AVC], frame sizes [e.g. 720p], & bit rates commonly used to store videos on a hard drive or USB stick anyway, & putting essentially the same video files in the Blu-Ray format just gives you more flexibility & features.

As usual with Aiseesoft, their Blu-ray Creator barely uses Windows registry, though as with anything using QT you might get several Trolltech cache entries, and installation adds it to the SystemFileAssociations Shell keys for quite a few video file name extensions -- FWIW I just copied the program's folder from a VM where I'd installed it & it runs fine once I registered or activated it there. In Windows it sticks to itself without effecting anything else installed. Besides the program's folder you get folders in All Users App Data & Program Data, & in both User AppData Local & Roaming.

Reply   |   Comment by mike  –  5 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+4)
#21

Fist test was not too promising. Two files taken from a sony full hd camcorder, one of the menu templates was used. There is no way to avoid re-encoding assuming the source file is in blu-ray format already.

Menu did not come up, and disk was not playable on a samsung bd-c5900. It did play on a toshiba bdx3200, but with some stuttering and audio/picture sync problems.

Bugger, because the program interface was pretty straight forward and easy to use.

Reply   |   Comment by John Doe  –  5 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (0)
#20

@Webfan

Assuming that your backup software supports a Blu-Ray burner drive, there is no reason why you cannot use Blu-Ray blank media to archive data files (pictures, documents, etc). One possible downside is that the backup process may be long, depending upon the amount of data you want to archive, and (if you have a LOT of data) you may exceed the capacity of the Blu-Ray media (25GB single-sided, 50GB double-sided), which would mean swapping in a new blank disc in the middle of the backup process.

Reply   |   Comment by TechPundit  –  5 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+9)
#19

I don't need BR burning software because I have not bought nor installed one yet. When I do, I am sure they will have the proper software with it. In fact, I've worked on many computers, and still do sometimes, and not one of them has had a blue ray player/burner installed on them.

Reply   |   Comment by Eddie V  –  5 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-22)
#18

Maybe I could use some help from someone with a lot more experience then I have. At this time I don’t have a blu-ray burner in my computer, but I am looking forward to getting one in the future. My object in doing this isn’t so much movies as it is to use the large capacity disks to archive more ordinary files such as documents, photographs, and similar. Is there any reason this wouldn’t work?

Reply   |   Comment by Webfan  –  5 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+7)
#17

Last year I purchased Aiseesoft DVD converter and thought "With software like this I can burn through my projects in record time".
Yeah, in my dreams. Immediately found a sound anomaly where bursts of audio made shreds of the sound track. I applied the most current update and looked around the forums for a easy fix. Later I called support and was treated with callous disrespect. To prove Later I test-installed this "software" on 3 other machines with the same results. Unusable wasted blank DVD-R's. It seems that these software company's are so full of themselves that they can't admit that bugs exist in their Creations. I never did get this resolved and Aiseesoft refused my application for a refund. My advise is to pass on whatever they offer.

Reply   |   Comment by TheFlashRon Smith  –  5 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+15)
#16

If you don't have room on your desktop computer or you're using a laptop computer then you can buy a portable Blu-ray player that plugs into the USB port of your computer.

As been said if your viewing your video camera recordings on DVD then your missing out on the higher picture quality that most video cameras have to offer.

Reply   |   Comment by Brian  –  5 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+4)
#15

@CooDaddy
We understand the function it performs.
So, being able to read and write, why should someone want to do this?
If you can't think of an adequate and thoughtful response, please don't say anything at all.

Reply   |   Comment by KP  –  5 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-10)
#14

@7 David
If your smart tv is HD and is able to play mkv format why not play a mkv file directly without processing it by Aiseesoft Blu-ray Creator 1.0.8.
If it is named e.g. xyz.ts (ts is a container format which can contain e.g. mkv or mpeg2, the DVD format, also VOB is mpeg2) you should simply try. Copy your file to your USB stick and look for play button or goto menu "Multimedia" or whatever.

to all:
Normally blue-ray recorders come with appropriate software but I hope Aiseesoft Blu-ray Creator 1.0.8 got more functions.

http://www.aiseesoft.com/blu-ray-creator/ tells:
"Multiple video editing features".
Therefore it even seems to be useful for people like David who simply wants to play their files on tv because you may crop your file before.

Apparently cutting is not available according to screenshots on
http://www.aiseesoft.com/blu-ray-creator/screen.html
That a function I'm missing dearly!!!!!
Other editing functions are watermark and manipulation of brightness, contrast, saturation and hue. That's it.

I don't remember any other blue-ray creator given away here. If you intend to buy a recorder or have got one you should give it a try in spite of low version.

Reply   |   Comment by FrancisBorne  –  5 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+15)
#13

..,and since almost every current $40 DVD player automatically upgrades pictures to High Definition watching, why do we need to go to the trouble to make a BluRay-DVD that only BluRay payers can handle?

Someone educate me.

Reply   |   Comment by David Roper  –  5 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-14)
#12

Reply to #4 - @Andrea:
"Looks good but what’s the purpose of a tool like this?
I mean why one should burn a video file in blu-ray format?
Comment by Andrea — January 17th, 2014 at 5:38 am"


The #1 most important reason is to get a High-Definition recording.
The old DVD format was "standard definition" of 720x480
while Blu-ray provides up to 1920x1024 resolution.
That's SIX times sharper!

Since today nearly everyone has Hi-Def TV capable of 1920x1024 they will expect the same clarity in videos made personally as those from movie studios and TV networks. Plain old DVD just doesn't cut it. ...And don't forget your Sony Playstation plays Blu-ray!

You will need to have a Blu-ray burner in your computer.
Your old DVD/CD burner won't make Blu-ray discs. Also Blu-ray recording requires Blu-ray blank disks. You can find them on-line as well as in better stores.

But even if you do not have a Blu-ray burner yet - or simply are out of Blu-ray blanks for your Blu-ray recorder, you can still use this program to make Blu-ray "images" as .ISO file to be burned later.

Another thing to keep in mind is this program can "read" the file formats of HD-video as well. These are in forms such as "M2TS" or "TRP" that are not readable by older DVD editing/recording software; you you may want this just for that. Even if you just need to read the Hi-Def in order to convert to standard-def video, as standard-def software can't touch those files.
There's a Hi-Def video editor too.

Reply   |   Comment by John  –  5 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+37)
#11

As this is a field I have some experience in, the primary reason for Blu Ray is High Definition video. A common misconception is that DVDs contain High Definition video. None do. So called "upscaling" is a cheat, and not the same.

Secondly, if you have standard definition video, you can put much more on a Blu Ray disc, than on a DVDR. BDR discs are about five times the capacity, and use better methods of compression.

Yes, you need not only a Blu Ray burner, you need blank BDR discs. Both were very expensive when Blu Ray was introduced. Nowdays, you don't spend much more than you would for a DVD burner and blank discs.

Reply   |   Comment by pixelriffic  –  5 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+18)
#10

when you get this nice app be sure to go to tools, preferences and uncheck update automatic weekly or you will lose this nice app. Gaotd do not update nor offer support.

Reply   |   Comment by mario  –  5 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+16)
#9

On Win7 64-bit, it installed fine, registered easily, and launches without difficulties. The help is informative.

If you have a Blu-ray burner, I think this is a good product to have in your arsenal of tools. Thank you to GotD and Aiseesoft.

Reply   |   Comment by Roy  –  5 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+2)
#8

Can the video be put on a usb thumb drive and plugged directly into a "smart TV" instead of using a blue ray disc?

Reply   |   Comment by David  –  5 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+8)
#7

@aba: I believe you'll need a blu-ray burner drive installed, or you cold use an external USB blu-ray burner drive. You'll need blu-ray blank discs too - available in 25GB and 50GB.

@Andrea: We like to share family videos and slideshows with our relatives. I used to make DVDs, but now that I have a HD camcorder and most people have blu-ray players and HD TVs in their living rooms, I can create blu-ray discs instead. I'm looking forward to testing this out.

Reply   |   Comment by Gandalf  –  5 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+22)
#6

@4 one might jump to the wrong conclusion that someone who can write can also read. Maybe have somebody read the description of the software to you...
"With this Blu-ray Creator software, you can easily make you own Blu-ray movies and play them on PS3, Sony BDP-S5, Samsung BD-F, LG Electronics BP, and many other Blu-ray players. "

Reply   |   Comment by CooDaddy  –  5 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+12)
#5

Well & good.
But where do you burn the Disc?? With the normal CD/DVD burner????

Reply   |   Comment by aba  –  5 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-65)
#4

Looks good but what's the purpose of a tool like this?

I mean why one should burn a video file in blu-ray format?

Reply   |   Comment by Andrea  –  5 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-53)
#3

Download, install and active the software smoothly on my New Desktop with a Sony Blu-ray Drive.
I used their blu-ray ripper on my old laptop when they did the promotion last time and it impressed me with the fast speed and many profile to choose. From the description, I think I need this software on my new computer, but I don’t have Blu-ray disc right now. I will keep this. Thx GOTD and Aiseesoft.

Reply   |   Comment by John  –  5 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-6)
#2

I got their Newsletter when they released their blu-ray creator, but I did not purchase it at that time. I think they will promote it on giveawayoftheday.com because they always do so. Yes, I made the right decision. Got the software active and can’t wait to try it. Thanks!

Reply   |   Comment by Joe  –  5 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-54)
#1

Please read this guide if you are not sure how to register the software. Installation Guide:
Step 1. Download Zip package from GOTD
Step 2. Unzip the Package and run setup.exe to install the software.
Step 3. Open “read me” txt, use the registration code to register it.
Learn more information about the software, please visit the pages:
http://www.aiseesoft.com/blu-ray-creator/

A 50% off coupon code (AISESZFP) is on the interface of Aiseesoft Blu-ray Creator. You can use it to buy

all the products at Aiseesoft (http://www.aiseesoft.com).

Here we recommend

the following five hot products:
Aiseesoft Blu-ray Ripper Ultimate
Aiseesoft BD Software Toolkit
Aiseesoft DVD Converter Suite Ultimate
Aiseesoft Media Converter Ultimate
Aiseesoft FoneLab

Reply   |   Comment by Aiseesoft  –  5 years ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+22)
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