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Advanced Time Synchronizer 4.3 Giveaway
$19.95
EXPIRED

Giveaway of the day — Advanced Time Synchronizer 4.3

Advanced Time Synchronizer keeps PC clock synchronized.
$19.95 EXPIRED
User rating: 86 (62%) 53 (38%) 70 comments

Advanced Time Synchronizer 4.3 was available as a giveaway on February 26, 2016!

Today Giveaway of the Day
$14.99
free today
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Advanced Time Synchonizer offers millisecond time synchronization accuracy (by contrast, build-in Windows time synchronization offers only second accuracy). The software keeps PC clock synchronized by polling time servers on intervals. It can be installed as a time server for local area network, as well as a service to work transparently for logged on users. You can find other features on the official web site.

System Requirements:

Windows 2000/ XP/ Server 2003/ Server 2008/ Vista/ Server 2012/ 7/ 8/ 8.1/ 10 Desktop 32 or 64-bit operating system.

Publisher:

Southsoftware

Homepage:

http://www.advtimesync.com/

File Size:

13.2 MB

Price:

$19.95

Comments on Advanced Time Synchronizer 4.3

64 comments
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If Windows fail, but this won't fail...

Reply   |   Comment by Carl Verg  –  4 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-1)

Glad this is being offered. I was in the middle of trying to split atoms in my particle generator, but I needed a more accurate time piece. Thanks.

Reply   |   Comment by elvisbop  –  4 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+1)

To the vendor SOUTHSOFTWARE,

Question: Are you offering a discounted price/coupon for GOTD users who are impressed with what they see, and want to purchase Adv Time Sync LiCENSE(s)?

Reply   |   Comment by J S  –  4 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (0)

J S Please feel free to contact us regarding this at http://www.advtimesync.com/support.html

Reply   |   Comment by Southsoftware  –  4 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-1)

I would think that this program - just like the company's other products relies on Online product activation and uses unique hardware identification.

I'd be prepared to bet that you can NEVER re-install the product using Today's GOTD ACTiVATiON Code

Reply   |   Comment by Peter Crosby  –  4 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-4)

Peter Crosby
Er You are not supposed to be able to re-install a giveaway on any day that is outside the giveaway period!

Some vendors don't enforce it and use their normal build, but many do enforce it by tying the registration code to a special build that is protected by the GAOTD SETUP.EXE/SETUP.GCD wrapper.

Reply   |   Comment by TK  –  4 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+1)

Silly program for home use. Now, if you need to schedule that next orbital capture of your supply capsule, I can see using it, but.....

Reply   |   Comment by Vince  –  4 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+4)

What´s about the time the signal needs from PC to server? When this tool say it sets the clock in ms it´s a big fake...

Reply   |   Comment by Clark  –  4 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-1)

Clark
Sorry but the roundtrip latency is calcuable and taking multiple samples on an SNTP server it is indeed possible to get calculated milisecond accuracy on any individual test, but in order to truely retain the systems clock accuracy you'd need to be regularly hitting the SNTP servers to correct the windows clock. That would ultimately breach the AUP of public SNTP servers and eventually cripple them if everyone abused them that way. This is the reason why the windows NTP checks occour with greater times beween checks as time goes by, to lessen the hit on vastly over loaded NTP servers like time.windows.com etc.

Reply   |   Comment by TK  –  4 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-1)

Excellent tool to keep a home theater PC behaving properly. Windows' built-in time sync seems to work only manually, despite its settings, and the clock runs fast. Eventually, programs start to get cut off at the beginning. I have enough to do in my day without remembering to adjust the clock on my computer on a regular basis. This software is a time saver - easy to use, and completely automatic.

Reply   |   Comment by S. Pupp  –  4 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-7)

S. Pupp I had to get a new computer in November and I am running into the same thing. Windows 10 will not keep time.

Reply   |   Comment by Velvet  –  4 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (0)

Velvet
The following are my settings. If they don't work, look into firewall issues, and give permission to the software:
Settings:
"Run" tab
Startup: - Auto start the program
Options: Synchronize time when program started,
Minimize to system tray instead of close,
Hide window after time correction,
Hide even if attempt fails.
"Operation" tab
Log file: Write time server connection log
"Service" tab
Service Install service,
Service settings Allow time synchronization from non-administrator accounts
"Time servers" tab time.nist.gov (SNTP; UDP/IP)
"Scheduling" tab
Auto start time correction every day
"Local server" tab left at default settings
"Sounds" tab turned all the blasted sounds off
"Dial-up" tab left deselected
"Proxy" tab left deselected
"Statistics" tab deselect "Do not save statistics information"

These settings work fine on my work computer running Windows 10, as verified by the Statistics tab and time server connection log (viewable from the "Operation" tab).

Reply   |   Comment by S. Pupp  –  4 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (0)

S. Pupp Thank you for your response. I found out what might be the issue I was having which also is why it took me so long to respond to your comment. The memory module (card) failed in my computer so I couldn't even get my computer started. I guess it was defective when I got the computer which gave me the time issues and perhaps my USB issues.

Reply   |   Comment by Velvet  –  4 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (0)

I run XP inside a virtual machine under Vista. Sometimes instead of closing the session, I freeze it (save machine state). When I restart it, the clock will be off by however long the session was frozen. I too often forget to synchronize my clock which has created problems. I need something that can be adjusted to syc more often than the windows native app. As soon as I restart is best. Now using chronograph free (has a timed nag splash screen), but willing to try this as potential substitute/backup.

Reply   |   Comment by James Stone  –  4 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (0)

James Stone
The reason the virtual machines clock refuses to sync is it uses a little sanity check and if the time/date difference between the internal clock and the NTP server is too large, then windows refuses to blindly trust the NTP server and returns an error, solution is to manually reset the clock or restart the virtual machine so it gets the hosts real date and time on its new bootup.. Or use any of a number of free NTP or SNTP time sync tools out there that don't force a sanity check on the NTP server, preferable something free e.g.

http://www.analogx.com/contents/download/Network/ats/Freeware.htm

Reply   |   Comment by TK  –  4 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (0)

TK

Thank you for your response. As I hinted at already, restarting the virtual machine is not always my preferred option (there's no point in saving the state if you just come back and reboot is there?) And also as I mentioned, I too often forget to manually reset using the native XP program. I am already using chronograph free which has a nag screen countdown timer that you have to acknowledge each time it is opened. But that is not a concern from a saved state, and the program allows sync frequency to be adjusted down to a minute. Or you can manually sync from the system tray. What I don't like is the app seems a little power-hungry as other apps may freeze each time it syncs. My browser in particular.
Does the app you recommend overcome either or both of those problems? And can sync frequency be adjusted to minute or less? Or in lieu somehow detect (the primo solution) the time differential within a minute or less and sync automatically. It all comes down to by being able to get to work quickly without risk of an unsynced clock time-stamping incorrectly.

Reply   |   Comment by James Stone  –  4 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (0)

James Stone
I suspect that you could enable hibernation in windows XP and instead of using the unsuported VM system to store the machine state use the supported hibernate method that will retrieve the current date and time on resume from hibernation.

I cannot give much further info on that atomic time sync program as it has been more than a decade since I used it in Windows 98, It's a small program and uses little resources and also provides NTP/SNTP server functionality too so you can run one LAN PC as a SNTP/NTP proxy and have the rest of the LAN machines sync to that PC locally... if I remember right.

Reply   |   Comment by TK  –  4 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (0)

Lots of great free software options.

The nerdiest/geekiest is from https://www.meinberg.de/german/sw/. (It's what I'm using now.)

However, a long standing easy to use favorite is D4 from Thinkman. http://www.thinkman.com/dimension4/default.htm

Reply   |   Comment by Wayne Bonomo  –  4 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+3)

20 bucks to set my clock? Really? Windows has a built-in "service" that allows your PC to reference an atomic clock server, such as the atomic clock servers operated by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in the United States.

And here's a free, opensource tool that does all this for you (works fine on Win10)...
http://www.timesynctool.com/

Reply   |   Comment by Cassy  –  4 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+15)

Installed and registered on windows 10 64 bit.

Says my system clock is 4 ms out!

$20 for this unnecessary program. I don't think so.

Reply   |   Comment by John  –  4 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+13)

John
mine 4.4 ms fast !

Reply   |   Comment by Sigrid.DE  –  4 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+2)

May be useful. I fly Southwest airlines about once or twice a year. The boarding pass must be obtained online beginning EXACTLY 24 hours from the scheduled takeoff. There is no assigned seating on SW, so your location when you board the plane is determined by this method. The earlier you get the boarding pass, the earlier you get to board the plane.

Reply   |   Comment by Frk040  –  4 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-34)

Frk040
And you can fill out the forms in less then one second, the time for the 'normal' lag?

Reply   |   Comment by TerryB  –  4 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-3)

TerryB
No forms to fill - Your login and password are already filled in.
You press 'Enter" and you're logged in and assigned your boarding location.
After that, you can take your time and complete application.

Actually, a few milliseconds will not make that much of a difference - you might get a few spaces ahead - I'll let you know in September.
Have a pleasant day.

Reply   |   Comment by Frk040  –  4 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-13)

Frk040
Maybe the error on your clock will be to your benefit, unless of course, Southwest uses their clock. What a silly discussion.

Reply   |   Comment by Mike H  –  4 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+4)

Frk040
What if your synchronised-to-the-millisecond clock is not matched by Southwest's clock?

Reply   |   Comment by Jeff  –  4 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (0)

A millisecond synchronization within a home computing environment is not only useless but an impossible task. Such a degree of synchronization is only feasible using dedicated local and network hardware/software not available to the general public, unless you are a millionaire prone to invest hundreds of thousands dollars in such a useless toy.
Don't waste you limited computing resources installing applets like that.

Reply   |   Comment by Luis  –  4 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+19)

Luis
Well Softshape dot com's Chameleon Clock v5.3.1 includes a latency adjustment that allows for the differing amounts of time (normally in milliseconds) that it takes for the program to connect with up to 10 different servers around the world and it will adjust the PC's clock until the time is millisecond perfect.

It is the only OATS compliant clock (meaning it keeps logs of connections and adjustment of times) that's affordable and it was a GOTD Giveaway about 5 years ago

The only trouble with Chameleon Clock I know of, is it was written using Borland Delphi 32 bit (from memory) and depending on the computer it can be a little buggy and may crash/require a program restart

Reply   |   Comment by Peter Crosby  –  4 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-1)

Luis
Sam Spades SNTP client seems to calculate it can get sub-milisecond accuracy over the public internet:

02/27/16 03:17:28 Synchornising time with uk.pool.ntp.org
Time uk.pool.ntp.org (212.71.248.69) ...

SNTP Response DD/MM/YYYY HH:MM:SS.MS
Client Originate Date was 27/02/2016, 03:17:28.170
Server Receive Date was 27/02/2016, 03:17:28.183
Server Transmit Date was 27/02/2016, 03:17:28.183
Client Destination Date was 27/02/2016, 03:17:28.197
Round trip delay was 0.027111 seconds
Local clock offset was -0.000348 seconds
time was successfully synchronised

Reply   |   Comment by TK  –  4 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (0)

Im happy if I know what day it is. Keeping time that accurate would be helpful to some businesses etc but not the general public. Especially for a fee.

Reply   |   Comment by Gene Diamond  –  4 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+16)

Try this for free!!
http://www.drive-software.com/freedesktopclock.html

Reply   |   Comment by magiccrpet  –  4 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-15)

The description does say it is freeware, and syncs to atomic time servers. There is an option to upgrade to a version with an alarm for $14.95.

Reply   |   Comment by S. Pupp  –  4 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (0)

This is awesome! I was a full 4.35 milliseconds late for work the other day. My company has a strict policy, so they refused to pay me for it and I got written up.

Reply   |   Comment by Neb  –  4 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+46)

Neb
Well, that comment got my day started with a grin.

Reply   |   Comment by Ron  –  4 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+19)

The main reason the NTP Internet Clock in Windows doesn't work seems to be your IP-address gets blocked.
I.e. if (as I am) is in Norrway try to contact time.nist.gov, I'll never get a response (since my IP is outside USA).

In my cast, I can use one of the servers listed here:
http://www.pool.ntp.org/zone/no

Or if you're in Denmark:
http://www.pool.ntp.org/zone/dk

Works very well; you'll get a response in a few milliseconds.

Reply   |   Comment by SnurreSprett  –  4 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+9)

SnurreSprett
Hmm, time.nist.gov works fine here in Finland.

Reply   |   Comment by Takiainen  –  4 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+4)

Takiainen
Terve-Terve.

Good for you then. Norwegian IP's are maybe blocked by time.nist.gov or something else is blocking UDP port 123 to get through.

Reply   |   Comment by SnurreSprett  –  4 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-4)

SnurreSprett
I have tried all the time servers in Win 10 and my clock still keeps stopping and once I shut down, I have to manually restart the clock again. Each and every day, it gets frustrating after awhile. I am in USA.

Reply   |   Comment by Velvet  –  4 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (0)

SnurreSprett
Try the domain names:

no.pool.ntp.org

dk.pool.ntp.org

any of the standard two letter country designations should work

Reply   |   Comment by TK  –  4 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-1)

Velvet
Buy a new mainboard battery.

Reply   |   Comment by Burni  –  4 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (0)

Burni My desktop computer was just purchased November 2015 and it has been going on since the first day. It was a Win 8 system that I upgraded to Win 10 the day I brought it home.

Reply   |   Comment by Velvet  –  4 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (0)

This does do what the Windows Time Service can do, but this is a lot simpler to setup a working NTP server.

Reply   |   Comment by Kevin  –  4 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-5)

Not for the first time (aaaargh) an app gets saddled with a retail price that works against it -- as here, where though free today, a potential $19.99 bill awaits in the event of a re-install. That prospect may be OK for those seeking more than a fast, simple, accurate synchronisation, but I'm not running a lab, just a home computer. For that reason I have a small icon TIME in my Firefox favorites bar which I click on as and when to go here:

http://time.is/

Thanks then, GOTD, and thanks, too, to today's developer, but the potential $19.99 wallet hit is much too much when that very handy little website is always free. Developers do have to cover their costs, but equally, they need to price their products in awareness of what's already out there in the marketplace. At $4.99 (or less) Advanced Time Synchronizer might have a brighter commercial future.

Reply   |   Comment by MikeR  –  4 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+29)

Was surprised by the size of the program file for what appeared to be a simple problem, namely that of an accurate time on your PC.
Decided to look on the Internet regarding this problem and was surprised at the difficulty it presented.

Here are some links that discuss it further:-
http://stackoverflow.com/questions/97853/whats-the-best-way-to-synchronize-times-to-millisecond-accuracy-and-precision-b
http://gpsinformation.net/main/gpstime.htm

To those who have only enjoyed the luxury of an accurate watch have missed out on so much fun; waiting for someone in the rain but your watch was 10 min fast and their watch 10 min slow and they were habitually late. Happy days!

When attempting to install today's offer the selection of what to install confused me, " Will be installed on local hard drive," and ": Entire feature will be installed on local hard drive."
Didn't want to install a set of languages and other bits and pieces decided not to bother until someone more capable than myself explained.

Reply   |   Comment by XP-Man  –  4 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+13)

Today's offer isn't for me, because I am still using an awesome freeware program called Time Synchronizer from 2003.

It has a modern looking GUI that is simple and classic. I now wonder what is the oldest piece of software in my PC.

It's an on-demand time syncing software that complements Windows built in time sync, so if ever you mess with Windows Calendar and/or time by hours, the Time Synchronizer software will instantly sync your PC clock to an Atomic Clock.

To be sure, the "instantly sync" is when you use a shortcut to Time Synchronizer program and provide two arguments of the desired Time Server and single letter of Y so that it sets the time in an on-demand method.

Both those arguments, in the Windows Shortcut, should be quote-less.

My current Time Server choices in the "time.txt" file is as follows, and is used when using the GUI:

#NTP servers list
ntp.nasa.gov
time-a.nist.gov
ntp2.usno.navy.mil
tock.usno.navy.mil

The above list should be revised for your location, just Google Time Servers to find the best one in your region.

Time Synchronizer: http://www.itsamples.com/time-synchronizer.html

Thanks GOTD for offering some new, and thanks Southsoftware for re-inventing the wheel with new options that are included in your version, but I'll stick with what works for me.

Reply   |   Comment by arttronics  –  4 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+5)

I would realy want to know in what non commercial application, one need to have "millisecond time synchronization accuracy"?
I don't wear a watch at all.

Reply   |   Comment by Adif  –  4 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+20)

Adif
me. lol...

I have OCD and my clocks have to be as accurate as possible...

that part's true, but seriously i DO see your point and it's valid...

Reply   |   Comment by jack  –  4 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+4)

jack
Me too. LOL
Suffer from ADHD (with a "side order" of OCD) and all my clocks (mostly atomic) click in eerie unison. (g)
BUT...
I'm also an amateur astronomer and run my "go-to," computerized telescope - and CCD Imagers - from my laptop, so having computer time down to a "nano-second accuracy" IS critical for ME.
So thanks GOTD & Southsoftware.
Looking forward to using this.

Reply   |   Comment by Glenn Norman  –  4 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+5)

Adif,
Amateur radio (ham radio) has a digital mode called JT65 which requires accurate time to synchronize the communication between two stations.

Reply   |   Comment by Ray  –  4 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-1)

jack
I suffer from CDO, which is like OCD but in alphabetical order as it SHOULD be!

Reply   |   Comment by Karl  –  4 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+7)

Karl

I suffer from COD, everyone wants me to pay them when I get stuff!
This is of no use to me, so I won't even vote on it.

Reply   |   Comment by Joe  –  4 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+2)

The most distinct feature of this program seems to be that every windows version is supported. A lot of features are mentioned, but they are not spectacular e.g. that is "waits for an established dial-up connecttion", "shows balloon tips when time is synchronized", that there is is al list of time servers available in the program.
The awards also pushes the product a bit too much over the edge. http://www.advtimesync.com/awards.html
As far as i know time synchronisation over internet is supported since windows 2000. I like that it remembers of the good old times but it is also a bit depressing to see it still around.

Reply   |   Comment by Ratel  –  4 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (0)

So, this does what Windows already have by default?
And costs $19.95 ? (outside today)

Even the "extras" are useless... The most possible usuable extra is the "local area network" sync, but even that is put aside, as Windows already hdoes the sync automatically...

Reply   |   Comment by DJPRMF  –  4 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+38)

DJPRMF

The clock in my wife's laptop stops when the laptop is switched off. The battery is OK. She uses her laptop once a week at the most. So she has to synchronise the clock manually after each start. She keeps forgetting how to to that. This means she cannot use SSL-connections:

http://security.stackexchange.com/questions/72866/what-role-does-clock-synchronization-play-in-ssl-communcation

https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc780011%28v=ws.10%29.aspx?f=255&MSPPError=-2147217396

Now the giveaway will set the clock automatically at each boot. Saves her buying a new laptop.

Reply   |   Comment by gergn  –  4 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+2)

gergn
If the mainboard battery is still in order then the fault lies with the mainboard.
At boot it cannot set date and time anyway, only once connection to the internet has been made.
A small, but significant difference.

Reply   |   Comment by Sigrid.DE  –  4 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+7)

gergn
In short, what Sigrid.DE recommends is that you ask a technician to check your Bios battery or do it yourself with the help of an screwdriver and voltmeter. By the way, if your battery is faulty the laptop may be losing other Bios configurations as well. On the other hand if the motherboard is faulty you must decide what to do next.
Good luck.

Reply   |   Comment by Luis  –  4 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+3)

Sigrid.DE
It depends on the definition of "boot" you use. See
http://searchwindowsserver.techtarget.com/definition/boot
where it is suggested the booting is finished as soon as the OS is running. If you use that definition, you are right. I should not have used the term "boot", but "startup". But in many cases there are a number of Windows programmes that the computer runs before "it's ready for users to run applications."

In my wife's case, she will have to wait until the giveaway has retrieved the correct date and time from an internet time server. Because only then she can start her browser to use SSL. And I am not going to teach her the fine difference between booting in ther strict sense and in the practical sense:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Booting

I might even put a tool on her laptop that will start her browser automatically only after the giveaway has done its work:

http://lifehacker.com/5425289/five-best-startup-management-tools

It is a nice thing (Imy wife is Dutch, not Scottish) that she can use an old laptop with a faulty mainboard;) At least for the time being ...

Reply   |   Comment by gergn  –  4 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-4)

Luis
I wrote "the battery is OK" because I checked it with a voltmeter. Apart from the clock synchronisation problem my wife is happy with her laptop.

Because of my work I bought a new laptop every time Microsoft produced a new OS: XP, Vista, W7, W8 and finally W10. The old ones now all have W10. The oldest is from November 2006 ...

Hardware seems sturdier dan software.

So if her laptop dies, she can take over one of my spares.

Reply   |   Comment by gergn  –  4 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-1)

gergn
If you want to redefine what booting a PC means then I won't stop you :-).

Faults in mainboards can be trivial or significant. Often referred to as slow death.
Whatever it means in your case nobody knows.
All I know is that false economy is neither thrifty nor clever, in case of a "working machine" the exact opposite.
In my language typically assigned to a person referred to as a DAU (duemmster anzunehmender User) or in a more friendly way, the problem sits in front of the monitor.
Good luck to you.

Reply   |   Comment by Sigrid.DE  –  4 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (0)

Sigrid.DE
What is wrong to keep using something that is working and discard it only when it is broken?

All my wife's data (mail and otherwise) are in the cloud. She can do all her work on any of the six laptops in the house. And on her iPad and my chromebook.

Reply   |   Comment by gergn  –  4 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+3)

gergn
What's wrong with fixing it if it's economically fixable? Then keep on using it as long as it remains economical to continue.
Re your wifes reliance on "the cloud"... It's all happy families. until the cloud servers get hacked and all her files and emails vanish into the clutches of some criminal syndicate...

Reply   |   Comment by TK  –  4 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+1)

gergn
I have had one PC that acted the exact same way, RTC chip refused to keep time when power was removed even with a new CR2032 cell fitted. The solution I found was restoring the CMOS and all registers to defaults by first zeroing all locations then letting the BIOS reset the CMOS/RTC to its proper defaults on next cold "BOOT"

Reply   |   Comment by TK  –  4 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+1)

TK
I have a old, spare laptop from 2002? with WinXP.
It's slow; so I drink coffee.
Also the sound is not good; there is sound, but cracking.
Someone said that I should repair it. Why? just a spare, old and only used for experiments.
Cost of repair: a new motherboard of 12 years old: about € 300. And a new one cost € 200,-
I have saved that 300 and together with other savings bought in a new notebook with 16 times memory, 8 times more CPU and 50 times more HD.
And 50 times faster.
If I did repair the old one, I could have bought a notebook with 4 times CPU, 4 times memory and 10 time more HD.
And 10 times faster.
And the old one waits for another experiment. in silence :-)

Reply   |   Comment by Ashamp  –  4 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+1)

Ashamp
As I said... "as long as it remains economical to continue"... if it still performs a function that would not be performed better in a virtual version of the laptop hosted on a modern system... why not keep on using it...

Reply   |   Comment by TK  –  4 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+1)
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