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Smart Defrag 5.8.6 Giveaway
$19.99
EXPIRED

Giveaway of the day — Smart Defrag 5.8.6

Smart Defrag is a safe, stable and easy-to-use disk defragmenter.
$19.99 EXPIRED
User rating: 77 (74%) 27 (26%) 72 comments

Smart Defrag 5.8.6 was available as a giveaway on May 27, 2018!

Today Giveaway of the Day
$15.00
free today
It's the fastest and easiest way to make your photos automatically great.

Smart Defrag is a safe, stable and easy-to-use disk defragmenter that provides maximum hard disk performance automatically and intelligently. With the new generation of ultra-fast defrag engine, Smart Defrag 5 can not only defragment users' HDD but also trim SSD to accelerate disk read/write speed and enhance disk durability. Users can easily defrag large files and consolidate free spaces with the newly added Large File Defrag and Free Space Defrag for more efficient defragmentation. You can also enjoy the best game experience with Game Optimize in Smart Defrag 5.

Please note: the license is provided for 1 year.

System Requirements:

Windows XP/ Vista/ 7/ 8/ 8.1/ 10

Publisher:

iObit

Homepage:

http://www.iobit.com/iobitsmartdefrag.php

File Size:

11.9 MB

Price:

$19.99

Comments on Smart Defrag 5.8.6

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#20

I have the IOBit package, installed and registered from the last "giveaway," but each program constantly pushes for me to upgrade to the pro version. I thought that was the reason for the giveaway, because you can get the limited free versions anytime. This seems like just a sneaky way of getting people to try their products.

Reply   |   Comment by grandude  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+3)
#19

I have an old GAOD version of this program it was about to expire, I refreshed the license, entered the new one that came with this download, and I got an extra year :)

Reply   |   Comment by JB  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+3)
#18

Didn't imagine it would be a problem after downloading - it did, and installed, AND when tried to find place to enter Reg, something popped up with it already showing "register number"......great
BUT THEN it NEVER WOULD WORK/SCAN. Clicking scan.......NOTHING........if there a SECRET I CAN'T FIND?

Reply   |   Comment by iwontell  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-3)

iwontell, well UNINSTALLED and Re-installed.......STILL NO HOT-SPOTS to make it scan.....NOTHING WORKS no matter where you click and the "magnet license" is dead too.......guess it WON'T work
OH WELL.........another hour wasted..

Reply   |   Comment by iwontell  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-2)
#17

Yes, Windows includes its own defrag software. However, the Windows defrag doesn't give you any options as to HOW you want to defrag your drive(s). e.g. Most frequently loaded files stored closest to the beginning or end of the storage medium. I occasionally run Smart Defrag to speed-up the boot-up time of my system, but I don't leave it resident in the tray icons.

Reply   |   Comment by Justin Alias  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+1)

Justin Alias, Ever heard of "Command Line Options?".

That being said, I use Perfect Disk Pro, commercial and must be purchased, but it's 1000x's better than Smart Defrag.

I don't trust IObit after their issues being accused of stealing MalwareBytes virus defenition files. But then again, I think if there is a virus out there and a definition file that can STOP IT for EVERYONE, I think virus definition files should be shared on all virus selling platforms to better stop such things.

Either way, my experience actually using this software a few years ago before moving to Perfect Disk Pro, although to be fair I was still using Vista at that time, I found JKDEFRAG better than this for Vista.

Just my opinions............ Good luck!

Reply   |   Comment by Bob  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+1)

Bob, Ever heard of "Command Line Options?" Of course I have, but I didn't know they were supported. Would be nice if Microsoft included the switches in their GUI.

Reply   |   Comment by Justin Alias  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (0)
#16

The free version is already one of the best defraggers available, way superior to the shitty windows defragger. Of course it's of no use if you have a ssd but otherwise, grab it...if you have the free version already installed, just use the key given here to activate pro version

Reply   |   Comment by JCR1960  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-8)

.
[ JCR1960 ],

Of course IObit Smart Defrag is useful on SSDs in that t trims SSDs, and, unlike Window's default defragger, it removes temp files on demand.

What is TRIM for SSD drives?

TRIM is a command with the help of which the operating system can tell the solid state drive (SSD) which data blocks are no longer needed and can be deleted, or are marked as free for rewriting.

In other words, TRIM is a command that helps the operating system know precisely where the data that you want to move or delete is stored.

That way, the solid state drive can access only the blocks holding the data.

Furthermore, whenever a delete command is issued by the user or the operating system, the TRIM command immediately wipes the pages or blocks where the files are stored.

This means that the next time the operating system tries to write new data in that area, it does not have to wait first to delete it.
.

Reply   |   Comment by Peter Blaise  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-1)

Peter Blaise, TRIM is a manufacturer specific ATA command used on SSD drives its purpose is not to help the operating system but to help the garbage collection and wear-leveling routines in the SSD drive to know when a previously written sectors worth of SSD memory cells is no longer needed and can be placed back into the pool of free memory cells to be erased and then used again in the next wear leveling firmware write to avoid leaving deleted clusters that are free to be reused outside the pool of spare memory cells and eventually exaustng that pool of free memory cells.

The operating system does not use TRIM or care about TRIM data it is only ATA interfaced SSD drives that use the data. SCSI SSD drives use the SCSI deallocate command in place of the ATA TRIM command.

Also TRIM command does NOT force an imediate memory page ERASE operation it simply assigns the sub-page indexed by that TRIM command onto the list of sub-pages that are no longer allocated to needed data and points that ATA LBA index to a clean previously erased memory cell sub-page and in some firmwares will not even read that sub-page until something is written since it is pointless to do so and instead will by default return sectors of all zeros imediatly giving the illusion that the TRIMmed sector was imediatly erased when it was not and may not be finally erased until the entire page of SSD memory cells are all in the list of TRIMmed sub-pages and can finally be erased by the garbage collection routines.

Reply   |   Comment by TK  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+1)

.
[ TK ],

Thanks -- yes, unlike HDD hard disk drive magnetic storage, some SSD solid state drive electronic storage apparently must be erased before rewriting, and to wait to do that only at the time of the operating system's immediate writing request to save a file would slow down responsiveness due to having to complete the erasure first, so it's good to pre-erase available space on electronic storage.

And, yes, anything between the user and their data can control and report whatever it wants to, essentially equivalent to saying:

Drive: "... yes I heard and accepted your command to write, move on, you do not need to know that I will write later ..."

Windows: "... thanks, moving on ..."

Drive, sometime later. mumbling to itself: "... oh, gotta write before power off, maybe I'll do it now while we're idle, and I have a bunch of other tasks waiting in the queue to write, also ..."

... or some such

By the way, Intel says: "... Only SSDs with drive lithography of 34 nm (G2) or newer support the TRIM command. 50-nm SSDs aren't supported ..." ... so, people, check the thickness of your SSD chip circuitry ( ! ).

Do we even HAVE TRIM triggers in our OS operating system?

Run [ fsutil behavior query disabledeletenotify ]:

DisableDeleteNotify = 1 (Windows TRIM commands are disabled)
DisableDeleteNotify = 0 (Windows TRIM commands are enabled)

Mine are ON, folks, nuthin' slows me down.
.

Reply   |   Comment by Peter Blaise  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (0)
#15

I like all of the Iobit software System but I also use System Mechanic, Fix-It Utilities, Revo Uninstaller Pro, Driver Genius, Spybot, and others. Even after not defragging for weeks on Windows 10, whether I use Iobit or System Mechanic, It takes less than five minutes on a 350 meg drive, I use my computer quite a bit so I know that windows 10 defrag is working well. If you want an excellent program to work on multiple computers from one computer, try Teamviewer 13. Make sure you highlight home base non-commercial for Team Viewer installation. Grammarly for auto word and sentence structure correction works great.

Reply   |   Comment by Steve Kahl  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-7)

.
[ Steve Kahl ],

Thanks for sharing, sharing, and sharing some more!
.

Reply   |   Comment by Peter Blaise  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-2)
#14

Windows has built in defrag.
If you want free and portable defrag, try Auslogics.
If you want to pay for defrag, try Diskeeper.
After trying previous iobit software, I prefer not to install iobit software in my PC.

Reply   |   Comment by ricohflex  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+16)

.
[ ricohflex ],

But AusLogics tries to install other programs, and load with Windows to always be running and phoning home, and Malwarebytes considers all Auslogics programs as malware ... others here at GOTD complain that programs should not offer or try to do that or have bad reputations according to any anti malware.

Do you think we need a help page on how to uncheck additional software piggyback installs, and how to turn off auto loading and phoning home, and how to determine if we actually WANT what someone considered to be "Potentially" Unwanted Programs ( PUPs )?
.

Reply   |   Comment by Peter Blaise  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+3)

ricohflex, I agree, I have used iobit software in the past, I purchased driver booster. I have since uninstalled it and use diskeeper, as iobit software was just too intrusive. I paid for their software and still got ads, I asked iobit how to disable the ads since I had purchased their software and they said there is no way to stop the ads, so I stopped using their software. The same issue occurs with NCH software, you pay for their software and get nothing but ads, NCH and oibit are just clueless.

Reply   |   Comment by Spyke - to SaaS or tonot(SaaS)'  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+10)

ricohflex, Thank you! I will get this since registration code that came in read now has reached the limit and can no longer be used to activate Smart Defreg.

Reply   |   Comment by Larisa  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (0)

Peter Blaise, Malwarebytes, does not detect Auslogics programs as being malware and has never done so. It detects them as being potentially unwanted. Potentially Unwanted Programs/PUPs are never malicious.

Reply   |   Comment by Roger  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+3)

.
[ Spyke - to SaaS or tonot(SaaS)' ],

Of course IObit will not tell you how to stop their own advertisements.

We here know, however, that all you have to do is terminate any IObit program after using it, eliminating any auto start auto schedule auto tray mode features.

I haven't seen an IObit ad on my computer in years, and I use IObit programs all the time.
.

Reply   |   Comment by Peter Blaise  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-1)

.
[ Roger ],

Thanks for clarifying that if you use "Malware"bytes in default auto mode, it will remove AusLogics programs.
.

Reply   |   Comment by Peter Blaise  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-2)

Peter Blaise, which iobit app due you use, as most of us know, just terminating the app will not stop the ads.

Reply   |   Comment by Spyke - to SaaS or tonot(SaaS)'  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (0)

Peter Blaise, once again, their products are not detected as malware. You can see this for yourself, by scanning the installer for any Auslogics product, at VirusTotal. They are removed due to changes in Malwarebytes PUP detection policy, which means that much more software is now detected as PUPs.

Reply   |   Comment by Roger  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+1)

.
[ Roger ],

Thanks for clarifying that if you use "Malware"bytes in default auto mode, it will remove AusLogics programs.
.

Reply   |   Comment by Peter Blaise  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (0)

.
[ Spyke - to SaaS or not to (SaaS)' ],

You are so right, that's why I terminate any IObit program after using it ( ANY utility or tool after using them, not just IObit, including Microsoft's own [ Print ] command, the world's first and shockingly undocumented TSR terminate and stay resident program that taught the world how to create TSRs ), AND I eliminate any auto start auto service auto schedule auto browser-helper auto tray mode features.

I recommend the free [ Autoruns ] tool from Microsoft SysInternals, though free [ CCleaner ] has some similar tools, as well as Microsoft's free [ MSConfig ], free [ Glary Utilities ], and just about any other free tool, including some free IObit tools themselves.
.

Reply   |   Comment by Peter Blaise  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (0)
#13

Thanks Iobit and GAOTD. I personally like this prog, and get it and all of it's stablemates when Iobit kindly offer them (at least once a year each prog) If I remember correctly it's Dashlane, a password manager that's the scary PUP everyones been frightened of. Dashlane is actually a nice prog, but I prefer sticky password, but I have no qualms using Dashlane if I temporarily lose my GOTD sticky password install. D Murphy you might not have noticed, but there is more than one defrag option in the prog. Yes the default one might be a bit quick for your liking, but do try the others before you write a disparaging comment. People do rely on the accuracy of comments posted to decide whether a particular giveaway is for them or not. Too often we get comments posted in here that are in fact unfair to a number of the offers companies kindly donate.

Reply   |   Comment by grange  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-1)
#12

I believe if you have an SSD there is not need for this.

Reply   |   Comment by John Davidson  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+11)

John Davidson, no need for this. Sorry.

Reply   |   Comment by John Davidson  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+6)

John Davidson, It doesn't do a hard "scrub" defrag on your ssd, but it runs a trim tidy on it. Non invasive and not detrimental to your ssd but I personally feel it freshens up my SSD and it is a shade quicker afterwards

Reply   |   Comment by grange  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-1)

grange, Any improvement for SSD is an illusion. All you are doing is shortening the life-time of your SSD disk.

Reply   |   Comment by Harry  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+10)

Harry, Sorry but in my case it's not. It cuts up to five seconds off my boot time after I use it. Very wide covering statement "All you are doing is shortening the life-time of your SSD disk." Powering on and off your pc do that too, so a bit of explanation of your assertion would be a handy thing to put if your making such statements in comments. This software as I said doesn't scrub defrag (lots of moving the head in traditional drives) it just looks and trims, same way win 10 treats SSD.

Reply   |   Comment by grange  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-2)

grange, have you measured the boot times and have a real figure of improvement as "upto 5 seconds" IS A MARKETING TERM! It really means it may be 0 seconds or even worse than 0 seconds -25 seconds improvement (slower at booting) for instance but is assured to never be better than 5 seconds improvement in boot time. So in empirical terms it is a meaningless claim! Do you have any real before and after measurements in boot time that are assured to be like for like? As anything below 5 seconds difference seems to be within the margin of error if programatically or manually attempting to measure just the boot time rather than the REBOOT time which is a different measurement altogether as it includes the logout and shut down duration too which is highly dependant upon the polite or need to force shut down of whatever active processes are active at the time of the re-boot request.

Reply   |   Comment by TK  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+6)

grange, IF windows 10 is TRIMing every file removal operation then no further TRIMing is necesary! Nor will it improve anything in terms of speed all it might do is place a previously TRIMed sectrion of SSD that HAS been formally erased back onto the to be erased list once again and therefore potentially shorten an SSD dirves life as every memory cell on an SSD has a finite and predicitable maximum number of erase cycles it can tolerate before it becomes unusable. There is no appreciably measurable improvement in operational speed of a good SSD drive on an adequate windows 10 computer system by performing ANY form of defragmentation TRIM based or "scrub" based which is a non-standard term and implies securely erasing the original clusters after a move which to my knowledge NO commonly available defragmentation tool does! Not the built in windows ones of ANY version nor any free one I've tried or any commercial one that uses the safe windows defragmentaion API since that retains the original data until it is actually overwritten at a later date which is how it can be said to be a safe defragmentation engine.

The Only quantifiable quality of improvement that can be honestly claimed for defragmenting an SSD drives contents is if the the file system control data structures are irritrevably corrupted, by cell failure or malicious overwriting, then having files data in contiguous logical locations on an SSD drive (or any drive) increases the ease of deep scan file recovery since it negates the need to do anything other than read the file type header to determine the files data size and read out that many clusters worth of data rather than painstakingly trying every other logical cluster on the drives "surface" from the point where illegal data is detected in the contiguous sections (which to my knowledge is beyond the scope of ALL consumer and commercial grade file recovery programs but may exist in nation states forensic recovery toolkits or maybe an AI will one day impliment it)

Only operating systems that could conceivably benefit from a "TRIM tidy" as you put it are ones that are not fully TRIM aware and implimented, e.g. Windows Vista or Windows Server 2008 or earlier versions that never implimented TRIM at the OS level OR an SSD that WAS in a USB enclosure under any operating system including the latest linux but has now been moved onto the mainboard interfaces directly like PCIx slots or SATA ports as no current version of windows is able to issue TRIM commands through a USB to SATA bridge because non of the bridge chipsets are smart enough to translate SCSI deallocate commands into vendor and device specific ATA TRIM commands. And that is ASSUMING any current operating system even issue SCSI deallocate commands on file deletion or movement from one logical cluster to another.

Reply   |   Comment by TK  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+3)

grange, 5 seconds is nothing. I would rather wait 5 seconds than install another program on my computer that just takes up space. You can cut more than 5 seconds off your boot time just by making sure unnecessary programs do not boot up at the start of Windows.

Reply   |   Comment by Velvet  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+6)

TK, boot time measurement is straight boot, I get my boot times every time courtesy of advanced systemcare, so it doesn't matter if its reboot or straight boot, I still get my boot time notification, so can see what it was, what it is and the boot times going forward. I know from looking at my boot times that by itself it can knock up to 5 seconds off, never retards my boot times and if I use it after running ASC, ccleaner or whatever other "cleaning" prog I find first in my desktop search have noticed a full minute plus off my boot times. I don't attribute that to defrag, just my 5 seconds diference.

Reply   |   Comment by grange  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (0)

Velvet, I like my 5 seconds, what can I say :) I'm not the most patient person around and 5 seconds quicker does me. TK thank you for the explanation, I love reading your explanations for things, so much better than the blanket statements some post (Not you Harry, you just could've done with a pinch more to explain) Too many people just post comments that aren't helpful or insightful about the offerings. I'm not really interested in what progs you have that are "way superior" so you won't be installing, I just want to know if the thing installs and what it's good and bad points are in your opinion. "It's crap, I uninstalled it", doesn't tell us much more than you installed it and thought it was crap, not why you came to that conclusion.
TK, sorry about my non - tech term, scrub as in the motion the arm makes as it sweeps back and forth across the floor, as you say I would be completely gazumped if it actually scrubbed the data, given that I spend half my time bouncing into the recycle bin or running recovery progs cause my concentration is lax (that's why I love my 5 seconds, less time I need to hold my concentration for :) )

Reply   |   Comment by grange  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (0)

grange, now you've said how you are measuring your boot times using ASC if you really do want the fastest possible boot time I'd recomend disabling the boot metrics and ASC entirely and removing all IObit programs you are not currently using. That will gain you a speedier boot up but just not tell you ASCs untrustworthy boot time duration guestimate.

Reply   |   Comment by TK  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (0)
#11

I use Win. default defragger. :)

Reply   |   Comment by Endomondo  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-3)

Endomondo,
SORRY to hear that..........hee-hee

Reply   |   Comment by iwontell  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-1)
#10

This is my favorite defragmenter. It has always worked right for me. Thank you.

Reply   |   Comment by Injeun  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-8)
#9

Hi, i do not know how to edit the comment. But i did find that , this software contains bundle ware , each time showing different from its servers, i suppose.
How GOTD allows those is new to me.
Please be careful not to tick yes on those commercial bundle ware and then download and register it with the code as given in the readme.txt

Reply   |   Comment by jraju  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+30)

jraju, Thanks for the warning. I hate this kind of 'added supplemental software' that you do not need or want. And, yes, GOTD should have a warning about this type of freebee

Reply   |   Comment by jj juice  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+3)

jraju, in this case, unlike with most software which comes bundled with extras, you need to manually select if you want to install the extras software or not, rather than it being automatically installed, unless you opt out.

Reply   |   Comment by Roger  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (0)

jraju,
To get around bundleware, be sure to check out program called Unchecky. It's a freeware program that prevents/unticks bundleware options added to installers.

Reply   |   Comment by Robert  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+1)
#8

ANOTHER one-year license AND a P.U.P....wow! Shades of WIN95, indeed.

Also, unless you're running a hard-disk drive (vs. a more recent SSD) the "defrag" function is - while nice - still pretty unnecessary.

Murphy? Best doublecheck that drive before your "Law" bites ya inna butt!

Nope...not for me.

Reply   |   Comment by vince brennan  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+1)
#7

Hasn't Windows included a defragger since, like, Windows 95?

Reply   |   Comment by Phlypp  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+3)

Phlypp, Yep Instructions here for W10
https://support.microsoft.com/en-gb/help/4026701/windows-defragment-your-windows-10-pc

Reply   |   Comment by D Murphy  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+1)

Phlypp, yes they have but they have always been the most primitive defragmenters possible, some would not even let you do ANY work on the drives during defragmenting causing the defrag to stop, re-analyse and start again every time it detected a write to the drive it was trying to defrag!

There is an optimised file placement on the surface of rotating magnetic media depending upon the file type and usage that Microsoft do not take advantage of, beyond optimising the files in layout.ini, that different 3rd party defragmenters have their own schemes to try and apply that often results in significantly less than optimal file placement and trying out different makers defragmenters often causes masses of file movements around a disk surface as each tries to impliment its own placement rules and as yet I have not seen any automatic placement better than manual placement if you have the necesary tools to do it.

Reply   |   Comment by TK  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (0)
#6

I've received the free version - were do I get the code to make it the 'Pro' version, please? Thank you.

Reply   |   Comment by Ian Meen  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-8)

Ian Meen, In the readme file

Registration code

Reply   |   Comment by D Murphy  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+3)

D Murphy, Great, thank you.

Reply   |   Comment by Ian Meen  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-2)
#5

I Installed it to try. Left me mystified and with a degree of disquiet. First during installation, need to be alert as it has a PUP for the unwary, something called flashlane I think. (GAOTD if your reading this I don't expect that on your site). I ran it on my terabite hard drive that has not been defragmented for years and it did something very fast (about 5 min) and said it was done. I used another defrag program (mydefrag) and analyzed the same disc and it remains with over 2/3 rds of it fragmented so I have no idea what smart defrag did but it certainly left a lot a fragments. It is hard to know what it was trying to achieve and also hard to know what if anything it did achieve. Just hope it did no harm.

Reply   |   Comment by D Murphy  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+44)

.
[ D Murphy ],

GOTD programs are TOOLS, so you do need to learn their features, benefits, and controls.

DashLane is a retail product for password management, offered on any freeware, but I agree, no GOTD offering should have a piggy-back attached.

Defragging is a science, with a purpose.

-- Defragging is NOT just to make disks quick.

-- Defragging makes data recovery after a crash easier because once a recovery program finds the beginning of a file, the rest of the file is immediately following, not scattered in undefragmented pieces all over the drive.

- Defragging can be used to gather all files at one end to empower partition resizing, or the other end to empower moving and defragging swap files.

Defragging can mean different things to different programmers at different times.

-- Some programs defrag leaving gaps for immediate availability of space for new or expanding files.

-- Some move directories to the outer ring and alphabetize files ( Norton for DOS, a version of DiskKeeper written solely to pacify me, makes Windows Explorer AND Check Disk very quick ).

-- Some move directories to lead all the collected files listed in each directory ( causes -s-l-o-w- directory refresh in Windows Explorer, and makes Check Disk take -f-o-r-e-v-e-r- ).

-- Some ignore large files, a variable setting.

-- Some ignore old files, because, hey, you're probably never gonna read that old file again, are you?

-- Some cleanup temp files, some ignore temp files.

Most have a variety of options.

MyDefrag ( free orphanware ) "system disk daily" is probably closest to IObit Smart Defrag "Defrag & Prioritize Files (Slow)" option EXCEPT MyDefrag does not clean temp files nor boot defrag before Windows starts.
.

Reply   |   Comment by Peter Blaise  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (0)

D Murphy, unless it's an external drive, that is not continually connected to your computer, Windows will automatically defragment it, once a week, as long as you are running Vista or later. If you click on the arrow, next to the defrag button in Smart Defrag, you can manually select a different defrag method.

Reply   |   Comment by Roger  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (0)

Peter Blaise, you said, "Defragging makes data recovery after a crash easier because once a recovery program finds the beginning of a file, the rest of the file is immediately following, not scattered in undefragmented pieces all over the drive.".

Actually, defragging your hard drive is the last thing you would ever want to do if you had to recover a file or folder from a hard. A defrag would overwrite the a part or all of the cluster area that contained the deleted file or folder new data. For instance, LSoft's Active@ Partition Recovery instructions say don't do anything to the area where you've lost a file or folder so our program can find your stuff.

Reply   |   Comment by DBF68  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+1)

DBF68, so much for the ability to edit your post:

"A defrag would overwrite a part or all of the cluster area that contained the deleted file or folder with new data."

Reply   |   Comment by DBF68  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+1)

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[ DBF68 ],

Defragging routinely ( and zeroing out slack and empty sectors / clusters ) prepares a hard drive for most efficient data recovery in the future event of a crash needing data recovery.

Of course writing to a drive that has crashed or that needs data recovery would be potentially destructive to any recovery effort.

Very smart of you to remind folks that defragging is not something one does to a crashed hard drive after a crash, thinking that defragging will facilitate data recovery, but defragging is something one does to a hard drive before a crash in order to facilitate data recovery should there be a crash later.

Thanks for reminding folks of the sequence of using our tools:

1 - defrag often
2 - crashes happen
3 - data recovery works best on a drive that was defragged before the crash

My overall point is that defragging offers other benefits besides just speeding up a slow drive -- defragging prepares a drive for easiest and most accurate data recovery in the future event of a crash, and that is a significant benefit of having a drive with minimal fragmentation all the time.

Great advice -- thanks.
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Reply   |   Comment by Peter Blaise  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (0)
#4

crashed my w10 comp, didnt install correct I think. but if clicked on desktop icon it would give error and restart. so uninstalled. didnt show in install list so manually found under iobit folder removed that way. have malwarefighter and iobit uninstaller works fine.

Reply   |   Comment by gb  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+2)

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[ gb ],

WIndows 10 comes in many versions, and probably doesn't like anything trying to access the hard drive directly, so try rebooting in safe mode to install it.

Also, super-scan for malware with a variety of scanners ( Malwarebytes, SuperAntiSpyware, SpybotSearch&Destroy ) to make sure you are not infected, and reset Windows 10 defaults using free Tweaking Windows Repair ... then try again.
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Reply   |   Comment by Peter Blaise  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-2)
#3

Thanks. Would be good to get some explanation about the advantages compared to the good free defraggler.

Reply   |   Comment by AR  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+18)

AR, And that cleaning program from yesterday. Did not you see that? That looks the same.

Reply   |   Comment by Hadrianus  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-7)

AR, that programm yesterday; the same version is given away Nov. 4. 2017 and if there are a few numbers behind the comma makes no difference.
I will say it again. If you indicate the C: \ D: \ of a partition, you will see a pop-up, there is EXTRA. Click on it, then men will see the disks and / or partitions. If there is an SSD, you can ONLY "Optimize". If there is also an HD (with partitions), then there is also "Analyzing and then Optimizing".
Optimization also happens when the computer has nothing to do.
There are when that can happen; daily, weekly or monthly.

For me that is enough to stay away from other clean-up programs.

The word "trimming" is actually wrong. Men trimming on mustache, women on bikini line and more. A submarine can also be trimmed
Opitmalising calls that Windows.
What is offered now can continue as the twin brother Van Pegasun System Utilities. Imagine Pegasun as the second (slightly modified) cleaning program that passes from IObit to gotd or vice versa. Or they look at each other, not unusual in that sector, but that way there are more cleaning programs in circulation that all squeal the same nonsense and wave with all the awards.
Or do they have the same CEO? Or is it a joint venture?
Then men are fooled and cheated where men assist. Of course it will rain complaints on the English site, take it from me. Or more happens more; the complaints are removed. Only the positive messages remain, even the fake positive messages from friends who say something in different names.

Reply   |   Comment by Hadrianus  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-7)

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[ AR ],

IObit Smart Defrag allows you to manually add filenames to defrag during boot before Windows loads, in addition to default boot defrag, it can temporarily stop VSS Volume Snapshot Service ( Shadow Copies for Shared Folders8 ) during defrag so Windows doesn't either try to re-copy anything that's moved, or doesn't keep an outdated map of where things aren't anymore, as well as deleting loads of pre-selectable temp files before defragging, and scheduling defrag.

The Pro version adds the ability to enable DMA Direct Memory Access for the fastest read / write, automatic defrag, and auto update.

I've used every defragger out there, and IObit Smart Defrag seems to provide the most responsive computer afterwards.
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Reply   |   Comment by Peter Blaise  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-2)
#2

Before download today's giveaway, you should consider the following.
Starting with Vista, Windows automatically runs a defrag, once a week. This is done in the background, so that you won't see it actually defragging your drive, but it does run every week. Not only does it run automatically, but benchmark tests, have shown that Windows defragmenter, works better than some 3rd party defrag tools, meaning that you will get better disk performance, by sticking with the included defragmenter. While, some 3rd party software, does do a better job, than Windows does, the performance gain, is usually minimal.

With this is mind, unless you really need the extra features provided by 3rd party disk defrag software, it makes sense to stick with the Microsoft's own defrag software. It works very well, runs automatically and you may actually reduce performance by using some of the 3rd party alternatives.

There will be people commenting here, that you should never defrag a SSD, as it will kill the drive. This is actually not true. Because of the way SSDs work, there will be very little, if any, performance gained by defragging them, This makes it pointless to do so. But, because SSDs have a very long life span (much longer than hard drives), it is harmless. If you have a SSD, Windows will do some optimising of it, rather than doing a full defrag, so there's no need to disable the scheduled weekly defrag.
https://www.howtogeek.com/256859/dont-waste-time-optimizing-your-ssd-windows-knows-what-its-doing/

Smart Defrag, usually will recognise if you have a SSD and only give the option to run a TRIM command on it, to clean it up, rather than doing a full defrag.

Reply   |   Comment by Roger  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+1)

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[ Roger ],

Yes, I have SSD's from 40+ years ago that still ... oh, wait a minute, those are HDD magnetic hard drives.

I look forward to 40+ years from now to assess SSDs comparative reliability ... to what will be 8o+ year old HDDs.

And more importantly, SSD RECOVERABILITY.

Does anyone have tools to recover data from dead SSDs like the tools we have for dead HDDs?
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Reply   |   Comment by Peter Blaise  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-1)

Peter Blaise, even a quick Google search will provide plenty of links, showing endurance tests, which prove just how long SSDs last. Here are three examples.

https://techreport.com/review/27909/the-ssd-endurance-experiment-theyre-all-dead
https://techreport.com/review/27436/the-ssd-endurance-experiment-two-freaking-petabytes
https://askbobrankin.com/ssd_drives_how_long_do_they_last.html

Based on my own usage. My main SSD, is a cheap Chinese brand - Kingfast. It is nearly three years old. During that time, it has had more than 42 terabytes of data written to it. According to the drive's own SMART data, it still has 88% life remaining. Even if this figure is perhaps somewhat optimistic, it still should last for years. This is impressive, considering that, while not a terrible brand, it is certainly not up the standards of Samsung and Intel, for example.

With regards to data recovery. Experts in data recovery Ontrack, state "Although recovering data from SSD is not an easy task, it can be done in many cases with great success."
https://www.ontrack.com/blog/2017/08/08/recovering-data-solid-state-drive/

On the whole, I do believe that SSD data recovery, is less successful than recovery from hard drives. But, if you keep regular backups, (which everyone should do, but few actually do), then SSD or hard drive failure is not as an issue. You need to consider as well, that, if a hard drive is badly damaged, the only way to recover data, is by professional data recovery, which can cost hundreds or even thousands of dollars and does not guarantee complete recovery. So, having a hard drive does not mean won't have issues if it fails.

I highly doubt, you actually have hard drives from 1978. Even if you do, tests have shown that SSDs can last for many decades.

Reply   |   Comment by Roger  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (0)

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[ Roger ],

Ooops, you're quite right, I just looked at my HDD cage and my Seagate ST-225 is only 35 years old.

I do have low level software to recover data, including track markers and CRC sectors, not just data recovery, but making the drive read/write good as new.

I haven't found the same field utilities for SSD or thumb-drive data recovery and refreshing to full performance yet though -- does anyone have suggestions?

I have rebuilt HD drives in the field to bring customers online and put them back in business, including opening the HDD cabinet, and spinning the dang thing with my finger on the edge of the platter to overcome stiction of the heads on the platter as I started up the computer, put the HDD cover back on, and told the customer not to turn the computer off again ... they were happy at a cheap 1/2 hour repair that saved their butt, and it kept working for years until they upgraded to a newer computer system, the drive is probably ground up by now and recycled as raw material, but if they had let me keep it, it would be in my RLL cage for testing on demand, though 30 MB is hardly worth plugging in considering that 8 GB thumb drives go for $4 and are way faster.

I'm just saying.

Someday, we'll wonder who ever used those old way-too-small-for-any-imaginable-useful-purpose 8 TB drives.

But you can count on me having one in my drive cage nonetheless.

I've got a few SSDs running now, but how fast do we need to wait for a web page to load?
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Reply   |   Comment by Peter Blaise  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (0)

Peter Blaise, In my case, thirty five years ago, I didn't even have my first computer yet. When I finally did get a TI-99/4A and then later a Commodore 64, I was initially using cassettes for storage. You don't have to do anything to keep SSDs working as fast as when they were new. Windows will automatically issue a TRIM command to SSDs and that is all that is needed. As for hard drives, it's simply not possible to make an old hard drive as good as new. Sure, there are tools as SpinRite, which can rewrite data to sectors to refresh them, but this does not make then as good a new. Hard drives have a limited lifespan and using tools like SpinRite won't increase it, but can help recover from bad sectors. Maybe one day, Steve Gibson, will actually find someone to code the promised v7 for him.

Both hard drive and SSDs will fail at some point. I've had a hard drive die after about two or three months of use. But, tests proved, that SSDs should last much longer. Sure, it will probably be easier to recover data from a hard drive when it fails, but the responsible thing to do, it to have current backups. In the past, I didn't back up my data and as a result have lost files many times due to hard drive failure. Maybe the drives could have been fixed by tinkering with them. Or, perhaps they needed to be sent to a data recovery company. At the time, the only option for me, would have been to pay for data recovery. I did not have the money to do so, so the data was permanently lost.

SSDs won't increase the speed of web browsing, but will make computer usage in general much faster. My laptop with 700 or so programs installed, boots in about 5 to 10 seconds.

The only good reason, in my opinion, to stick with hard drives, is the cost of SSDs. SSDsm usually will much last much longer than hard drives do, and if they do happen to fail early, that's what backups are for.
Due to the cost, when I switched to using a SSD a few years ago, I went from a 500GB hard drive to a 240GB SSD. After using 500GB hard drives for years, I did find having only 240GB storage to be very limiting, but the massive performance boost, made it worthwhile. In time, I replaced my optical drive with a second, 120GB SSD, to give me extra soace.

Reply   |   Comment by Roger  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (0)

.
[ Roger ],

You win -- loading 700 programs at boot in only 10 seconds is a world record! ;-)

Steve Gibson and his GRC[.]com is weird, and does his own SIB small-is-beautiful program language writing, and now, after influencing the industry to make everyone else's computers faster -- first with re-interleaving hard drives, then extolling the virtues of RLL, then rewriting video BIOS for then-unimaginable speed -- he has effectively retired on SpinRite v6's laurels, being only 170 KB, it is the most thorough and safe magnetic surface recovery and reconditioning software out there.

I also use Dmitriy Primochenko's Abstradrome HDD Regenerator from DPOSoft[.]net, which is more powerful than SpinRite, and more dangerous, occasionally sacrificing and blanking user data in favor of making a drive work regardless, and at 8,124 KB, it is 47 times larger than SpinRite, showing Steve Gibson's programming savvy.

Personally, I can't breathe with less than a 2 TB drive in any of my computers, and I backup routinely to a redundant 30 TB farm ( lots of drives and fans ), so HDD it is for the foreseeable future.

And, on topic, IObit Smart Defrag helps keep it all clean and responsive.

( We have an incredible group of PC savvy here, I'm grateful to all who contribute. )
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Reply   |   Comment by Peter Blaise  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (0)
#1

“but also trim SSD to accelerate disk read/write speed and enhance disk durability” - is the bit that worries me. I have an Intel SSD which I use the Intel SSD Toolbox to maintain, and I have a Samsung SSD, which I use Samsung’s Magician to maintain. When I do run TRIM via the Windows 10 Maintenance feature in the Control Panel, which I do only once a month at most, I feel quite secure in that it’s built in to Windows, and that it won’t mess my system up, give me the blue screen of death, or rapidly destroy my SSD’s.
For me to use this software blindly though, with no other evidence of its capability, is a no no to me. Especially as it’s IO Bit. You’ve destroyed several of my computers in the past with your former giveaways, and no, I don’t forget, or forgive. I avoid your software like the plague now. So be this a word of warning to other users. Use at your own RISK..
Thank you for the great offers we’ve had this week GOTD.

Reply   |   Comment by Richard Sebire  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+6)
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