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Silver Key Standard 4.9.2 Giveaway
$29.95
EXPIRED

Giveaway of the day — Silver Key Standard 4.9.2

Sending confidential data over the Internet!
$29.95 EXPIRED
User rating: 25 (66%) 13 (34%) 47 comments

Silver Key Standard 4.9.2 was available as a giveaway on December 14, 2017!

Today Giveaway of the Day
$9.99
free today
Add stickers to your desktop and create reminders for your upcoming events!

If you need to send sensitive data over the Internet you should encrypt it first. But what about the other side? The recipient will probably not like the idea of buying and learning some software just to decrypt your file. No problem here if you are using Silver Key.

Right-click the file or folder you wish to send and select the "Create EXE Parcel" command. Silver Key compresses and encrypts your data and adds a small decryptor program. Your correspondent does not need to install any decrypting program because the parcel already contains all the needed software.

If your demands are higher, you can use the Silver Key Parcel Designer to create more advanced encrypted parcels. You can add encrypted and unencrypted comments, create shortcuts on the target computer, request opening a file after decryption, and even include an uninstaller.

Please note: the download archive includes the Portable USB version as well!

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System Requirements:

Windows 2000/ Server 2003/ XP/ Server 2008/ Vista/ 7/ 8/ Server 2012 (x32/x64)

Publisher:

Inv Softworks

Homepage:

https://www.kryptel.com/products/silverkey.php

File Size:

37.5 MB

Price:

$29.95

Comments on Silver Key Standard 4.9.2

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Please add a comment explaining the reason behind your vote.
#11

Here is an idea, since everyone is arguing over the validity of the program.

When you send something via email, you obviously have the ability to resend if the intended receiver botches the password. Why allow hackers etc, endless time to use a password program to ultimately break open the file?

Send this with a ONE TIME ONLY try on the password. Get it wrong, the file implodes. That would actually make this a program that those needing to send sensitive files, could rely on not to be broken if it were in the wrong hands.

I don't need this, so I am not downloading it, like hiliarity clinton, my 33,000 emails that I have sent over the last year, are all just about my yoga class, but I am not worried if someone reads those.

Reply   |   Comment by Anthony  –  4 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (0)

Anthony, one time only try on password is not easily enforcable since one can simply save a fresh copy of the encrypted parcel from the emails attachment and try again, and keep on doing that until you get bored or find the password.

Reply   |   Comment by TK  –  4 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (0)
#10

Will it install and run under Windows 10 x64?

Reply   |   Comment by Sumo  –  4 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (0)
#9

I cannot find an executable for this software, any help here would be appreciated

Reply   |   Comment by stanfi10@gmail.com  –  4 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-1)
#8

Hello, i have a question... is winrar a good way to encrypt files? How secure is it compared to this program being given away?

Reply   |   Comment by jay  –  4 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (0)
#7

Wait, if you include the decryption program with the package, doesn't this defeat the point of encrypting in the first place?

Reply   |   Comment by kelvinwop  –  4 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+5)

kelvinwop, no it does not. Please read the comment #1 and replies to it.

Reply   |   Comment by Andre (Kryptel support)  –  4 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+2)

Andre (Kryptel support), Oh ok, so what's the difference between using this software versus encrypted zipping (to .7z) and then changing the file extension?

Reply   |   Comment by kelvinwop  –  4 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+1)

kelvinwop, a computer geek may be happy saving, renaming, archiving, unarchiving and so on. A typical housewife or an office worker would prefer to open an encrypted document simply by clicking a link in an email. That's speaking about usability.

Speaking about security - I don't want to say anything bad about 7-zip and other archiving programs, but adding AES didn't make them encryption software. There are a lot of other things, key handling is the most important and probably hardest to implement one.

7-zip is ok for low requirements. If you want to prevent your children from viewing some family photos, any archiving program will fit the task. If you need to protect your important business data, well, I wouldn't rely so much on 7-zip. A specialized program will be a better choice.

Reply   |   Comment by Andre (Kryptel support)  –  4 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+1)
#6

Using FREE SafeHouse Explorer self extracting file and change extension name for emailing. Yes it's encrypted.

http://www.safehousesoftware.com/SafeHouseExplorer.aspx

Reply   |   Comment by cn  –  4 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (0)
#5

Can this software be used if I just want to encrypt a PC file (and not send it) or should I be using something more traditional like Veracrypt, etc...?

Reply   |   Comment by dan  –  4 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-1)

dan, sure it can, why not. But our other product Kryptel suits the task better. Here is a product comparison:
https://www.kryptel.com/products/comparison.php

Reply   |   Comment by Andre (Kryptel support)  –  4 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+1)

dan, We've been using BitLocker since Windows 8 Pro.

Reply   |   Comment by Kim  –  4 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (0)

Kim,
So you'd only use SilverKey when emailing a file?
Dan

Reply   |   Comment by dan  –  4 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (0)
#4

As a reply to #2 (Eriksson) and #3 (MikeR):
Yes, most mail servers block attached executables, but Silver Key solves this problem.

First, you can create a non-executable parcel, which never gets blocked.

Second, you can send your executable parcel via Web storage. For example, right-click a file and select 'Create EXE Parcel and Upload to / Google Drive'. The program will encrypt and upload the encrypted file, and will return you a download link, which you can paste into your email.

Reply   |   Comment by Andre (Kryptel support)  –  4 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+11)
#3

Whatever you're sending via snail mail, the envelope / package / parcel had better be of approved content, otherwise the mail service may not deliver it.

Whatever you're sending by email, the communication had better be of the kind approved for transit, otherwise the email carrier may not deliver it.

This software really is a bad, bad idea.

Aside from the waste of money to be incurred by a purchaser who only afterwards discovers that gmail and other carriers will rightly block any email with an attachment with the potential to cause harm -- and nothing has greater potential than an .exe file -- there's also the fact that persuading anyone, friend or relative alike, into the habit of opening emailed executables (should such ever come through to them) is massively irresponsible.

Best practice now as always is: if you've sensitive information to share with someone else, zip it in encrypted form. The file can be unzipped by the recipient using whatever password you've previously agreed in a phone call. Software by the Open Source 7 Zip --

http://www.7-zip.org/

accomplishes the task with ease, and even if the recipient doesn't have the same software as you, 7z files can be read by the standard WinZip.

7-Zip has a retail price of $nothing and in all the years I've been using it, not once has an encrypted 7z file been obstructed by gmail or any other carrier. Silver Key Standard is $30 and not once has its developer come on here to explain why anyone would want to raise a red flag with an email service by attempting to send out an executable.

Thanks GOTD, but no thanks.

Reply   |   Comment by MikeR  –  4 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+7)

MikeR!

By the way, even exe-files hidden in zip-files are rean veiled by g-mail and thus that kind of zip-files are also impossible to send by g-mail. (By the way2: There ought to be a program that encrypts exe-files in such a way that they can slip through g-mail as some bla-ha text in txt-files.)

And even if having received exe-files on USB-drives, those exe-files can not be run on a computer without having role of administrator.

Reply   |   Comment by Eriksson  –  4 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+2)

MikeR, as you quite rightly say there are problems sending .EXE files via email servers as they are treated at potentially harmful. The simple way round this is to simply change the file extension to something else (i.e. .DOC, .DLL) and then include a note in the email to rename the file to filename.exe. Works if file isn't too big as some services restrict the size of attachments, but if reasonably small it usually works. I've not downloaded today's software as I run my own secure server and have no use for this.

Reply   |   Comment by Robert  –  4 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+12)

Robert, the problem with renaming file extensions is windows in its default configuration hides known file extensions meaning that if you use a known registered file extension like .DOC then windows won't let you see the .DOC to rename it to .EXE . Tech users tend to disable the hide extensions for known file types as a way to improve visible security so malware attachments are not so easily disguised with an extra spoofed file extension. beth.jpg.exe in a zip attachment otherwise only showing up as just beth.jpg but is really an executable when the zip is opened.

Reply   |   Comment by TK  –  4 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (0)
#2

G-mail does not allow sending exe-files as attachmets. Is there any web--based mail that does?

Reply   |   Comment by Eriksson  –  4 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+7)

Eriksson, Simply rename the exe as exx or anything else which by prioe arrangement the recipient will rename back.

Reply   |   Comment by Laxative  –  4 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+9)

Eriksson, I like to rename .exe in .txt

your explorer has to show the extension (you can change this in settings)
then one click on the file name which makes the name blue
then a second click (do not make a double click!) on the file name which will set the file name in a editable field
set the cursor with the mouse to the end of the extension
delete exe by using the DEL <- key
write TXT and press Enter key

recipient has to do the same analog for renaming into EXE

I hope I could help

Reply   |   Comment by Ritchi Freudenkinder  –  4 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+4)

Eriksson, Gmail is smart enough to see if an attachment has a modified extension, even within a classical zip.

I trick Gmail by using 7-Zip to encrypt both files and their names. In that way I can send executables via Gmail. 7-Zip is free and can also carry a decryptor.

Reply   |   Comment by krypteller  –  4 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+8)

krypteller,
I have 7-Zip and don't see anything about encryption in their HELP; where are they hiding it?
Thanks,
Dan

Reply   |   Comment by dan  –  4 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-3)

dan, It's on the right side of 7-Zip's Archive page:
http://www.medicalnerds.com/how-to-encrypt-zip-files-securely-using-7zip/

Reply   |   Comment by sirpaul2  –  4 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (0)

dan, select some files, click-right and choose 7-Zip. Then the first choice: add to archive. You see a menu where you can choose the password and encryption of the file names at the right. You do not need a help function for that. But in the lower right corner you can click on Help. See General information/7z format and then see "Strong AES-256 encryption".

Reply   |   Comment by krypteller  –  4 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+4)

dan, I also do use 7-Zip, but only for .zip and then you can not encrypt the names.
But when you select .7z them there is that option:
https://www.dropbox.com/s/44rvy5co0nk0ti0/Verschil.png
Also when you open a .ZIP-file with a hex-editor, you can read some names at the end of the file. With .7z I do not see a thing:
https://www.dropbox.com/s/swme44yv9nvpi71/Verschil-2.png

Reply   |   Comment by Ootje  –  4 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (0)

krypteller,
Thanks - that was a big help.
But please verify that unless I also password protect it (using the 7-Zip option) the encryption is meaningless since the file opens upon double-clicking; so what good does the encryption do since it is only the password providing the security.
Dan

Reply   |   Comment by dan  –  4 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (0)

krypteller, but doesn't the recipient also have to have 7-zip installed? Or can another zip program work? Probably 7-zip allows one to make a self-decrypting exe file, but then you're back to the email problem (?).

Reply   |   Comment by Fred  –  4 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (0)

dan, I also do use 7-Zip, but only for .zip and then you can not encrypt the names.
But when you select .7z them there is that option:
https://www.dropbox.com/s/44rvy5co0nk0ti0/Verschil.png
Also when you open a .ZIP-file with a hex-editor, you can read some names at the end of the file. With .7z I do not see a thing:
https://www.dropbox.com/s/swme44yv9nvpi71/Verschil-2.png

Reply   |   Comment by Ootje  –  4 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (0)

Fred, Re " doesn't the recipient also have to have 7-zip installed? "

Yes, but he also has to have a browser installed to read this ;)

and the software to read or view the de-encrypted contents of the 7z-file. 7-Zip is free and very easy to install and use.

Indeed 7-zip allows you to make a self-decrypting file. I very seldom do that, because i consider 7-Zip to be a household necessity for a Windows user. And it also runs under Wine in a Linux-environment.

Reply   |   Comment by krypteller  –  4 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+2)

dan, No: it encrypts. Check it for yourself. Just take any text, encrypt it with 7-Zip and a reasonable password (I suggest a space) and open the resulting .7z-file with a hex editor. You will be able to open the file, but you will not recognize the original text. Do not believe me, but do it as homework tonight.

Reply   |   Comment by krypteller  –  4 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+2)

krypteller, this is the encrypted output of 7z, with a spac as the key:

7z¼¯' €™K’p ( ÿ…ÓMŸàêÕ[,#T~ÚNR ÝOÓs˜‰Wù:{W

Reply   |   Comment by krypteller  –  4 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+2)
#1

If you send the file encrypted with the decryptor all together make no sense. Anyone who "intercept" the file will read anyway.

Reply   |   Comment by Trabanom  –  4 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+9)

Trabanom, having a decryptor does not mean that you can decrypt. You need to know the password.
If the decryptor is sent along, the recipient does not need to download and install the product, that's all.

Reply   |   Comment by Andre (Kryptel support)  –  4 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+28)

Trabanom, we know the encrypted exe file that you send to another individual already has the decryptor embedded in it, and I would hazard the guess that it would definitely require the recipient to enter a pre-arranged password to make it work.

Reply   |   Comment by Dambrosiosis  –  4 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+2)

Andre (Kryptel support),
Based on your reply, doesn't that mean that essentially the file is only password protected?
Dan

Reply   |   Comment by dan  –  4 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+2)

dan, "only password protected"?? How else can you protect a file, aside of sending it with an armed courier? Encryption is the only programmatic method of data protection, at least it is the only method that fits this particular task.

I possibly didn't get your question right.

Reply   |   Comment by Andre (Kryptel support)  –  4 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+2)

Andre (Kryptel support),
What I meant was if someone can crack the password then they would be able to decrypt the file just like the receiver would since the decryption program is sent with the file - no?
Dan

Reply   |   Comment by dan  –  4 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+2)

Andre (Kryptel support), besides password protection you also have "Lock/Key" file encryption. PgP is a good example of "Lock/Key" encryption. The sender encrypts (the "lock") and sends the file and the recipient downloads the decryption file (the "key") from a secure server.

If you need to encrypt data then its worth the few extra steps of the Lock/Key method and every web mail service I've ever used allows the encrypted files to be attached as long as they meet the size restrictions (if any). Sending an .exe file, encrypted or not, is just bad security practice and should be avoided like the plague. You have to remember... A Person can be very smart, but People are dumb. So if you get people used to clicking on an .exe file from an email then they are more likely to open the wrong .exe file later.

Personally if/when I need to send encrypted data I use a military strength Lock/Key program and use a encrypted email service.

Reply   |   Comment by SilverDragonSys  –  4 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (0)

dan, whether the decryption program is sent or not is not important. Having the decryption program will give an attacker no advantage at all. The decryptor is no secret - even if it is not sent, it is included in the product distribution (how else could legitimate users decrypt their files?).

The password (or the key) is the only thing that counts, and it is the only thing that must be kept secret. Just don't choose a password that is easy to crack. Check this article out please:
https://www.kryptel.com/articles/encryption_passwords.php

Reply   |   Comment by Andre (Kryptel support)  –  4 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+2)

dan, If you encrypt a file: yes every one can decrypt it. BUT it takes a lot of time to guess it.
For some good encryptions methods it will take just a few decades with all the CPU power in the world together.
The enclosed decryptor can only decrypt the file, if the password is already in possession of the receiver.
And do not send that password in the same message ! !

Reply   |   Comment by Ootje  –  4 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+4)

Ootje,
Don't you have to have a key to decrypt an encrypted file? Though I haven't yet installed SilverKey, I get the impression that the receiver can open the file as well as anyone who can intercept the email. Obviously I'm misunderstanding how this works.
Dan

Reply   |   Comment by dan  –  4 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+1)

dan, I think that we have a misunderstanding about each other.
Normally when a file is encrypted with a password, then the file AND the password must be sent to the receiver. The password is needed to decrypt the file.
BUT, when you sent that in one mail, the interceptor has it all and also can decrypt the file. AND that's is the not the meaning of encrypting.
Therefor tha password must be sent in a different mail. Maybe on a different address,
Often the password is sent via another way, let say a SMS,TXT, by phone, or snail-mail.
Or something only the other person knows, date of the first kiss, name of the second dog, name of the first teacher, . . . .
And for decryption the receiver needs to use a program to decrypt the file. For convenience the program of today has the possibility to add that part of the program at the encrypted file and sent it as one part. The password must be sent in another way/mail/phone.
And in that way it is safe. Even when the interceptor got the encrypted file. He does not have the password and then he need for some decades all the CPU-power of the world to crack it. And after that it is already in the history-books.

Reply   |   Comment by Ootje  –  4 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+1)

SilverDragonSys,
Well said - I'll keep that in mind.
Dan

Reply   |   Comment by dan  –  4 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+1)

Ootje,
I guess that I'm under the impression that a password can be more easily hacked than an encrypted file. Combining the 2 is better, but once you get passed the password isn't the encrypted file the real challenge?

Sorry but I'm still confused: You say "the password is needed to decrypt the file" and then you say you "need a program to decrypt the file". Which is it?
Dan

Reply   |   Comment by dan  –  4 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+1)

dan, Maybe you should read this on Wikipedia about cryptography:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cryptography
Short: Cryptography: write a message in a way, so nobody else can read it, unless you know how.
In the Netherlands we use a bank-card with a PIN-code.
When you use it, you need to type the PIN-code to prove that you are the owner of the card.
A message: when I write "Uijt jt b nfttbf".
I do not think that you can interprete it.
But when I say, that I encrypt it and type every time the next letter in the alphabeth.
Instead of an "a" I typed a "b"; instead of a "b" I type a "c".
So then the text would be: "This is a message"
So "Uijt jt b nfttbf" is the encrypted message and the key is read "a" instead of a "b".
This is done for ages and nowadays we use computers for it. Also in 1940-1945: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Enigma_machine
So for computer we use a encryption-program to encrypt a text with a key(password).
The result is a encrypted file, that can not be read in a normal way.
This result-file has to be decrypted first and the receiver needs to use the same password as used for encryption to decrypt the file.
And each encryption-program uses it own method to encrypt, so you have to use the decryption-program of the same softwarebuilder, therefore the GOTD-program has an option to send that to.
Short: to encrypt - use an encryption-program and a password
to decrypt - use a decryption-program and the same password

Reply   |   Comment by Ootje  –  4 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (0)
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