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LetsExtract Email Studio 4.3 Lite Giveaway
$19.00
EXPIRED

Giveaway of the day — LetsExtract Email Studio 4.3 Lite

Powerful, Fast & Easy-to-Use Email/Phone/Skype Extracting Software.
$19.00 EXPIRED
User rating: 25 (46%) 29 (54%) 48 comments

LetsExtract Email Studio 4.3 Lite was available as a giveaway on August 9, 2018!

Today Giveaway of the Day
$49.99
free today
All-in-one Video/Audio Converter and Editor.

LetsExtract Email Studio is an all-in-one email harvester software. It is a simple and ultimate tool created to harvest mail addresses, phones skype and any custom items from various sources: websites, google, yahoo, Gmail and other search engines.

Main features:

  • Easy to use and intuitive user interface
  • Highly targeted leads
  • Search for one or more keywords at once
  • Geo-targeted countries
  • Save your project settings and re-use later
  • Great for industry professionals
  • Search all major search engines or a custom search engine
  • Four powerful searches in one tool
  • Search for all major email domains or a custom email domain
  • "Must have" tool for your marketing toolbox!

System Requirements:

Windows 7/ 8/ 8.1/ 10

Publisher:

LetsExtract Software

Homepage:

https://letsextract.com/

File Size:

53.1 MB

Price:

$19.00

Comments on LetsExtract Email Studio 4.3 Lite

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Please add a comment explaining the reason behind your vote.
#12

Engima Internal Protection Error. Please Contact The Developer?

Reply   |   Comment by Quach Phat Thang  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+3)
#11

I decided to google the extent that would make certain laws consider, email extractors such as LetsExtract Email Studio, as illegal, and the summary of my research is this: IT IS LEGAL IN ITS OWN RIGHT! But like any other sensitive software, USER DISCRETION IS ADVISED.

Paper clips can be used to open certain padlocks easily.
Screwdrivers can be used to burgle in several ways.
Everything boils down to usage of the software and usage of its information.

For me, it is a smart tech tool.

Afterall google maps and some other software gives out addresses and actual locations of any address required. Why crucify a software that reveals Email addresses. We may need addresses for legal marketing which is cool.

However, this software refused to register after installlation on my windows 7 ultimate 32 bit machine. Probably because it considers my country a hot zone (Nigeria). Too bad I uninstalled it anyway..

Reply   |   Comment by olumideodegbaike@live.com  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-1)
#10

Great program! I installed this on a server in the closet of my home where I keep all my most important emails. Will this also help find "confidential" emails? Thanks again.

Reply   |   Comment by Hillary C.  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-4)
#9

As used by Cambridge Analytica?

No company information (address etc) on the website front page.

I can find no mention of them on PCMAG.COM, let alone being an editors choice.

It has CON written all over it.

Reply   |   Comment by PhilS  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+24)
#8

What is the limitation that makes this software a "lite" version. Also, the publishers web page does not clarify what the difference between personal and business versions.

Reply   |   Comment by Gilbert Maynard  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+12)

Gilbert Maynard, Their site is conspiciously silent on what a lite license is... the installer we are given is bit for bit identical to the installer available from their site is only thing I can confirm...

I do note the testimonials on their site:

"Extracting phones is no longer a problem for us. Your app is a spammer's must-have tool, I highly recommend it.

Oleg, a realtor, YourUK agency (United Kingdom) "

or a spammer in denial:

" Thanks a lot for your software! It's just what I need. I wouldn't say I'm a spammer, but sending advertising newsletters is an additional source of income for me. Targeted newsletters still work great. I highly recommend using LetsExtract Email Studio.

[Anonymous testimonial]"

https://letsextract.com/#features

Reply   |   Comment by TK  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+1)

.
[ Gilbert Maynard ],

The FREE GOTD LetsExtract Email Studio Lite Personal version does file, folders, websites, search engines, whois, but does not do companies, lists, mailboxes, Yelp, Facebook, or Twitter.

The difference between $50 personal and $70 pro PAID versions seems to be ... um, $20, and may or may not include and exclude what we get and don't get in the FREE GOTD Lite Personal version.

The FREE trial version appears to have all features.
.

Reply   |   Comment by Peter Blaise  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (0)

Gilbert Maynard, When you installed, you will immediately understand the difference

Reply   |   Comment by Dimma  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+1)
#7

I tried this software and uninstalled it just after one run, reason, while you are searching for e-mails, phones, Google is connecting your IP address to all of your previous searches and makes a profile of you. How I know this, I set up a tracking software for all of the IP addresses contacted for that session and found out that the tracker is also being tracked and all of the info sent to Google web site in California what it looks like the Google analytics server.
This software is just a tool that displays and also collects data on all users, I would stay away from it.

Reply   |   Comment by Bentta  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+23)

.
[ Bentta ],

But Google has no way of knowing you are using this software because [ LetsExtract Email Studio ] does not use any Google Chrome web browser resources and does not search through Google in any way.

Anyway, I just used today's GOTD software to recover a lot of contact information from a recovery mess from one of my own crashed hard drives -- priceless!

Great software, I like it.
.

Reply   |   Comment by Peter Blaise  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-1)
#6

I won't downvote because disapproval of the software's purpose is not what the voting system is for, but thanks for contributing to tidal wave of useless spam that's drowning the internet. Shame on GOTD for offering this.

Reply   |   Comment by Felix Crevat  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+24)

Felix Crevat, , i also found this

1. Our cookies expire in 365 days.

2. Our partners get a 50 percent commission from each sale made via their referral link.

3. First, you need to create a ShareIt account.

4. Then connect to us here with your affiliate login and password.

© LetsExtract Software 2017-2018. All rights reserved.

Reply   |   Comment by Ivanovitch  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-6)
#5

I looked at letsextract.com home page for more information about their product. I followed up on their award winning claims on PCMAG which I couldn't find any trace of it and also The European Software Testing Awards 2016 website which said "No results for your search". To LetsExtract Email Studio, please verify your claims and clear this up.

Reply   |   Comment by Tester  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+44)
#4

Only legitimate use I can think for this software is to check your own publicly posted content for email addresses being left in inadvertantly so you can properly scrub them from public view.

Reply   |   Comment by TK  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+22)

.
[ TK ],

Yes, self-inspection.

Plus hundreds of other uses:

-- scan your own hard drive for UFO contact information,

-- scan a web site to find who's responsible,

-- scan a forum to build a list of folks with which to form a new group,

... it's a just a tool, and just like a screwdriver can open a can of paint even though it's not in the owner's manual for a screwdriver, we can think of many, many uses for any tool.
.

Reply   |   Comment by Peter Blaise  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+3)

Peter Blaise, here we go again? I did qualify my statement with "legitimate use" not ad-absurdum use... use it to crawl a forum you do not own and harvest any emails leaked out to public view by noobie posters and then use it for your own personal or commercial purposes and you may well find yourself banned from said forum for unathorised personal data harvesting and you may fall foul of data protection laws in some way too. It is not A tool it is a collection of tools whose advertised function is fundimentally illegal in EU at least. On websites I designed this tool would not harvest any email addresses as my mailto URL's were generated dynamically in javascript and raw email harvesters would harvest email addresses like spam@uce.gov so any robot harvesters that do not filter the harvested emails might just send their SPAM to US FTC reporting address directly.

Reply   |   Comment by TK  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+9)

.
[ TK ],

Imagine other legitimate uses of today's giveaway:

-- scan recovered data from a crashed hard drive to rebuild one's own contact lists.

-- scan one's own web site to insure all data is accurate and nothing unintended is presented.

There is absolutely nothing illegal in today's software, it's just a tool.

Again, it only scans one's own hard drive.

Even though people think that they browse the web, they do not, they can only browse their hard drive.

Their browser copies publicly available information from the web to their hard drive, then displays it on screen from their hard drive.

No one can see anything on the web.

They can only see things stored on their hard drive.
.

Reply   |   Comment by Peter Blaise  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-1)

Peter Blaise, "-- scan a forum to build a list of folks with which to form a new group," Do that without many forum's permissions, and see how long it is before you may get a knock on the door.
This is not "just a tool"..it could be considered an invasion of privacy for some..I'm sorry but your "screwdriver" comparison will not fly and perhaps you should read laws of other countries in regards to using this kind of software.

Reply   |   Comment by DJ  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+7)

.
[ DJ ],

As old forums ( foureye ? ) die and get archived to the Internet [ archive . org ] way-back-machine, it's hard for prior members to regroup, and this is a tool that might help one of us to facilitate connections between folks who may want to know that a new group is forming elsewhere if they want to join.

Not every endeavor is nefarious, folks, but thanks for sharing your rich imaginations.
.

Reply   |   Comment by Peter Blaise  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (0)

.
[ TK ],

Pen and paper also support illegal activities, but pen and paper are not illegal in themselves.

If someone uses [ LetsExtract Email Studio ] to facilitate their other activities of fraud, it's their fraud that's illegal, not this software.

I've already used this software to scan a recovered hard drive mess of data and report to me the contact information lost in the recovered unstructured raw files.

Totally legal.

I love it.
.

Reply   |   Comment by Peter Blaise  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (0)
#3

Use of this software to populate a marketing mail list of customers within the EU would be a breach of existing EU directives and member country corresponding laws. Under no circumstances can harvested email addresses be considered to have opted in to any marketing email database and to use it as such could subject the aberant sender of unsolicited commercial email to multi-thousand $/£/Euro fines per recipiant that never solicited or consented to such UCE/SPAM. Other jurisdictions may have their own laws regarding UCE which may be less or more severe.

Reply   |   Comment by TK  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+28)

.
[ TK ],

No, the broadcast of unsolicited emails may be regulated, but using this software is not regulated by any legal statutes -- it merely scans your hard drive and reports contact information to you.
.

Reply   |   Comment by Peter Blaise  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-2)

TK, i also found this

1. Our cookies expire in 365 days.

2. Our partners get a 50 percent commission from each sale made via their referral link.

3. First, you need to create a ShareIt account.

4. Then connect to us here with your affiliate login and password.

© LetsExtract Software 2017-2018. All rights reserved.

Reply   |   Comment by Ivanovitch  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-7)

Peter Blaise, wrong again, GDPR applies to most of the data mining this is designed and marketed to do. It does FAR more than merely scan ones own hard drive, there are 10 major operations if you do not register the LITE license or 4 major operations if you do register the LITE license. Scanning files and folders is just one minor operation. Are you just trolling for for the sake of conversation?

Copyright laws are breached too by the inclusion of 3rd party code in the program without attribution of the code and its rights owners and display of their licensing terms too.

Reply   |   Comment by TK  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (0)

.
[ TK ],

[ LetsExtract Email Studio ] can only scan files on your own computer.

All browsers copy web data to your hard drive before then reading that data from your hard drive and displaying it on screen.

There is no information I have seen in this thread or anywhere else that indicates that [ LetsExtract Email Studio ] contains unpermissioned copyright material.

I'd love to read other people's experience of actually USING today's GOTD.

Apparently, for all your contribution to this thread, you have not used the software.

Okay.

Anyone else?
.

Reply   |   Comment by Peter Blaise  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-1)

TK,

We can all review a useful, vetted summary of the GDPR General Data Protection Regulation ( EU European Union only ) with 100+ references to explore at [ https :// en . wikipedia . org/wiki/General_Data_Protection_Regulation ].

I see no relevance to today's GOTD giveaway of [ LetsExplore Email Studio ], and I suggest that discussions of the EU GDPR migrate to some other more appropriate venue.
.

Reply   |   Comment by Peter Blaise  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-1)
#2

I'm not in the business to which this kind of software is directed; I actually spend more of my time ensuring that this kind of software never works on me. I am, however, interested in software offered on GOTD because this platform has the potential to flag up the unexpected and the original.

Unfortunately, this giveaway isn't worth my time because the developer has conspicuously failed to explain the difference between what may be temporarily on offer today and what is permanently available: there is no such product as LetsExtract Email Studio 4.3 Lite, priced $19, on the developer's website.

Suspicion inevitably arises that this is a crippled "sell-up" product whose limitations will only be discovered after a user has gone to the time and trouble of downloading and installing it. The developer would do well to come on here and clarify the situation. It would also be helpful to know when PCMag reviewed this software and endorsed it with an "Editor's Choice" rating, for although this award is prominently reported on the LetsExtract
website, I haven't yet found it.

Reply   |   Comment by MikeR  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+66)

MikeR, the strange thing is that there is never again spoken about ß-versions. Is it such a program?

Reply   |   Comment by Ivanovitch  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-9)

.
[ MikeR ],

Yes, there is often variance between what's promised, what we expect, and what's really inside each day's offering.

Regardless, it's all free, and some of it turns out to be a mismatch for our interests, and a waste of time, and some of it seems okay if not stellar.

Today's offering of LetsExtract Email Studio v4 makes random email lists, it does not build a useful address book, and their free web-based equivalent shows the results -- just a bunch of unreferenced emails ... and their phone extractor failed to work in my test.

They have self-identified competition: Email Extractor Pro, Email Grabber, Lead Extractor, Email Miner, Email Scraper ... so now we can more easily comparison shop, though we can do a simple Google search for "extract contact information from the web" or simply "data scraper".

That said, what's the value in this software for those of us NOT building a broadcast email list for spam or to sell fresh lists to spammers?

I tested by entering one of my favorite hobby sites, and it immediately built a site map for me, so now I not only know what's on the site, I also know from the web page titles exactly what web page will bring me to particular subjects that I did not previously know were offered, web pages about subjects that interest and fascinate me, but were buried and obfuscated by an inelegant web designer ... for example, I had no idea the web site had a forum, now I know how to connect with other readers.

I like that this software offers results in process, it produced 2 emails almost immediately while it continues to hunt through thousands of other web pages for my test site, so I could get started contacting these people without waiting for completion -- luckily some email addresses show someone's name in them, however, this software does not scrape nearby information to identify an email holders name otherwise, so, for example, [ j2043 @ email . com ] will leave you wondering who that is, but [ jsmith @ email . com ] at least is semi-self-explanatory.

This shows you the web page it came from so you can review the source for context just in case someone does put their name neat their cryptic email address.

I can imagine this is also a useful tool for when I have a challenging transaction with someone and I want to contact the owner, their boss, or whomever is responsible, I can explore their public presence for ways to contact them, then either use it, or turn it over to my lawyer, a court, the FBI, and so on.

there are many features only available in the upgraded "Pro" version, such as email verification, this is the "Lite Personal Version".

It can search my hard drive, deady slow, but scraped from programs and photos, not just text documents, so that may be informative.

It's a tool, now to play with creative ways to implement it's features and reap some benefits ...
.
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Reply   |   Comment by Peter Blaise  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+8)

Peter Blaise, thank you for describing a useful, legitimate use for this software by consumers. Sometimes just tracking down contact info on a website can be frustrating and this sounds like it could help.

Reply   |   Comment by Bebop17  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+2)

Peter Blaise: there are a myriad ways via which to discover "an owner, a boss, or whomever is responsible" without necessarily resorting to this type of software. Unlike some other posters, I've not commented on the nature of today's giveaway, merely on the fact that it seems a cynical sell-up using a crippled version of its product and which isn't on sale for $19 anyway. I find that kind of tactic contrary to the ethos of this website -- "FREE licensed software you'd have to buy otherwise" -- hence my earlier post. Your decision to indulge the developer is yours to make but it doesn't seem to me to be helpful to other computer users who would hope to see a higher standard of honesty and transparency amongst software developers as a whole.

Reply   |   Comment by MikeR  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+14)

Peter Blaise, Perhaps you should read the developers web site before posting a review of questionable software.
"Our software will automatically scan social media profiles and extract such information as occupation, education, likes, and comments. It will also extract the users' public email addresses and phone numbers. If a group or user has provided a link to their website, Email Studio will follow the link and extract email addresses, phone numbers, and other contact details directly from that website. It will also search for the users' Facebook or Twitter UIDs on the Web in order to find their email addresses and phone numbers." As was posted, this can lead to some not so nice things happening to otherwise nice folks. Laws do not discriminate where you got the software from.

Reply   |   Comment by DJ  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+12)

MikeR, I got bored and installed it on Vista.... the google chrome framework this uses for web access does not execute under versions of windows prior ro windows 7 but the GUI works "fine" under vista... Before activating the lite license ALL the Search options are available in the drop down menu.... and all the options apear to try to work but fall over once the chrome engine framework library is launched and it fails under vista BUT if one activates the LITE license suddenly the last 6 out of the 10 search options are disabled and no longer available and if I try to launch them from the New Search window buttons it prompts me that is only avaialable in the Pro version would you like to upgrade your license?

So this giveaway license is a not for sale anywhere I can find crippleware license.

Assuming this program does work as promissed under Windows 7 and above it is best used as demo evaluation mode using runasdate to keep it going than to apply this crippleware license.

I am not inclined to install this on my Windows 10 laptop as it is not a testbed for fake commercial giveaways so cannot confirm it really works.

I do notice that in Settings | Program Settings | Connection tab there are 3 not selected options the first and third options are in English but the second option the first part of the text is written in a Cyrillic font, I do not know what it says but I can guess the option should read "Never extract more than '1000' emails from the same page" That GUI bug may be related to it running under Vista and not Windows 7 or above but I doubt it.

Reply   |   Comment by TK  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+1)

.
[ DJ ],

I think you are suggesting that there are prohibitions against unsolicited, er, solicitations, spam, junk mail, and or fraud.

Okay.

So don't do that.

Collecting information is legal, and the tools to collect information are legal, especially when used on publicly accessible information.

I think that some GOTD visitors today are confusing their own frustration with spam and junk mail ( and phishing and fraud ) ... versus ... anyone in the public knowing anything about us that we have made publicly known.

I have absolutely no idea why any GOTD visitor would be upset or bothered by any GOTD offering, including, especially, [ LetsExtract Email Studio ], a product with tons of competition readily available world wide ...

... software that automates tasks we all could do by hand,

... even without computers,

... just sit in your local library and courthouse and take notes from public records.

This software does not even include any publishing or email-construction or email-broadcast capability, yet a few GOTD visitors today have complained almost exclusively about publishing and email-construction and email-broadcast activities -- totally off topic.
.

Reply   |   Comment by Peter Blaise  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-2)
#1

Is this kind of software really legal? It completely ignores all privacy regulations and harvests/distributes email and login (skype) info without the consent of the owners!

Reply   |   Comment by Anonymous  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+30)

.
[ Anonymous ] wrote "... Is this kind of software really legal? It completely ignores all privacy regulations and harvests/distributes email and login (skype) info without the consent of the owners! ..."

... from publicly available information that has already landed inside your own computer in your own browser cache ( no one surfs the web, their browser does, and copied the web to browser cache, then anything you see on screen has already been written to your own private hard drive -- you personally are only surfing your browser cache, not the web ).

What's your "legal" "permission" worry about reading stuff that's already written to your own computer?
.

Reply   |   Comment by Peter Blaise  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+1)

Peter Blaise,
So you're saying that for example hackers who hack into other people's computers, copy information from there and distribute that information, are really not doing anything wrong, because all the information they share was already 'publicly' available on their own computer anyway?
I'm not sure if you're familiar with the GDPR privacy regulations, but companies and websites that process and store personal information (including email addresses) either need to have permission from the user to process that info, or they need to have a grave (and legally accepted) reason - for example anti terror agencies. It doesn't matter if the source of that information is a public web page (of one of the companies that *does* have that permission).

Reply   |   Comment by Anonymous  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+7)

.
[ Anonymous ],

No one is "hacking" into anyone's computers [ sic -- you mean "cracking" ... hackers are good, crackers are bad ].

You misunderstand the power of today's software -- haven't given it a try, eh?

So, you are just writing in speculation on what tools it provides, eh?

Okay.

You are in error, however, and nothing you are writing about has anything to do with today's software.
.

Reply   |   Comment by Peter Blaise  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-2)

Peter Blaise, you have some strange ideas. Just because it may be displayed on your computer screen it does NOT mean you now own it and are entitled to do anything you want with it. EVERY piece of data or works of art or intelectual property is covered by an explicit or implied copyright license and the vast majority of such licenses start with all rights reserved meaning you have NO rights to use it beyond that which is stipulated or implied. By default every new piece of published work is copyrighted unless it is placed into the public domain, even then your rights to assume ownership of public domain content is not granted under the copyright treaties around the world.

IF all you do is read publicly published email address, no problem but if you harvest those email addresses and compile a mailing list without the owners consent and then send unsolicited mail in bulk to the illegally compiled mailing list then you have exceeed the puropse of the original publication of the email adresses and are breaking multiple laws. Same goes if you sell your illegally compiled mailing or cold call lists. Which is the intended purpose of this set of tools to compile an unlawful to use or sell for use mailing list or cold calling list.
You may have the right listen to a music track via Spotify service privately but you don't have the right to play that same track on Spotify at a public event like a disco or pub without paying the requisite public performance licensing fee or you also do not have the right to legally capture the streamed track played on the Spotify service for offline use just because it is being played through your PC's private sound subsystem and speakers. You could do it but in doing so you are breaking laws and could be prossicuted and if discovered by Spotify you could have your account terminated and lose access to the service for breach of their end user licensing and terms of service.

Reply   |   Comment by TK  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+3)

.
[ TK ],

You're confusing public publishing and public distribution with ownership of copies in one's own property.

Personal use is settled law since Sony won the Betamax time-shifting case with a decision in court that said essentially that if it arrives in your home, you can do whatever you want with it in your home, including recording it and playing it back later, Spotify included.

So, yes, of course you can print a copy of someone else's copyright image found on the web, or play back a copy of music recorded from the free public airwaves, or downloaded from Spotify, since you've already made a copy of it on your hard drive.

Remember, no one sees or hears anything on the web, they only see or hear what's already on their hard drive, so the copy has already been made just to just to empower you to look at it on screen or hear it through your speakers.

Of course there are legal prohibitions against unpermissioned public re-publishing it or re-distribution outside your home ( except "fair use" is permitted without permission, but that's yet another subject unrelated to today's giveaway ).

Again, there is absolutely nothing illegal in today's giveaway.
.

Reply   |   Comment by Peter Blaise  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-1)

.
[ Anonymous ],

[ LetsExtract Email Studio ] has no ability to "hack" into anyone's computer.

It simply scans your own hard drive, and reports to you any contact information it finds.
.

Reply   |   Comment by Peter Blaise  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-1)

.
[ TK ],

You off topic, because [ LetsExtract Email Studio ] has no publishing or broadcast features ( and doesn't do music, though it will scan music files for contact information and report it to you ).
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Reply   |   Comment by Peter Blaise  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-1)

Peter Blaise, are you having trouble dealing with the conversation? That was adressing a similar example that you seemed to justify or assume ownership of because it had to be copied to your local hard drive by the web browser... The comment included plenty of content completely relevent to this giveaway in addition to discussing your odd apparent morals.
I won't be responding to most of your replies as they are equally irrelevent to the giveaways designed and marketed function and would just be a waste of my time repeating myself.

Reply   |   Comment by TK  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (0)

.
[ TK ],

[ LetsExtract Email Studio ] has no publishing or broadcast features.

[ LetsExtract Email Studio ] doesn't do music, though it will scan music files for contact information and report it to you.
.

Reply   |   Comment by Peter Blaise  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-1)

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[ Anonymous ],

We can all review a useful, vetted summary of the GDPR General Data Protection Regulation ( EU European Union only ) with 100+ references to explore at [ https :// en . wikipedia . org/wiki/General_Data_Protection_Regulation ].

I see no relevance to today's GOTD giveaway of [ LetsExplore Email Studio ], and I suggest that discussions of the EU GDPR migrate to some other more appropriate venue.
.

Reply   |   Comment by Peter Blaise  –  2 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-1)
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