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Block Webcam and microphone 2.1.0.2 Giveaway
$49.00
EXPIRED

Giveaway of the day — Block Webcam and microphone 2.1.0.2

Avoid hacking through webcam or microphone.
$49.00 EXPIRED
User rating: 27 (45%) 33 (55%) 68 comments

Block Webcam and microphone 2.1.0.2 was available as a giveaway on May 21, 2019!

Today Giveaway of the Day
$99.95
free today
1AVCenter is a complete audio video center.

How to Block WebCam and microphone ?
It is becoming a problem to steal your privacy by illegally hacking your webcam or microphone.
You can use the webcam cover, but you can forget the cover after using WebCam, and there is no alternative way to prevent microphone hacking.
There is another way.
Please try "Block Webcam and microphone". You no longer need to use the webcam cover.
Approved programs (such as Skype, Viber) can use WebCam and Microphone, but unapproved programs can not use WebCam. If some programs access your WebCam or microphone, then you will first see a pop-up window asking you to confirm your approval. You only allow use of WebCam or Microphone for programs you trust.
You can protect your WebCam and microphone from hacking with very simple settings.

Features:
* Prevent malicious programs use of WebCam or Microphone to access information.
* You must specify the applications that can use the WebCam, Microphone.
* We provide a list of widely used applications for user convenience. (Please register the accepted application easily with a single click)
* The application that is installed by default when installing Microsoft Windows can use the WebCam, Microphone.
* If an unregistered application attempts to access to webcam or microphone, ask the user whether to allow the this operation.
* When the main program is terminated, all programs can not access the WebCam or microphone.

See more videos

System Requirements:

Windows 7/ 8/ 10 ( 32&64 bit); Windows Server 2008 R2 or later; supported languages: English, Spanish, Japanese, Chinese (simplified), German, French, Portuguese, Russian, Dutch, Turkish, Korean, Hindi

Publisher:

xSecuritas

Homepage:

https://www.xsecuritas.com/block-webcam-and-microphone/

File Size:

20.5 MB

Price:

$49.00

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Log in to your system and web browsers using fingerprint management.
Developed by New Softwares.net
Developed by Kaspersky Lab
The standard anti-malware solution for Windows.

Comments on Block Webcam and microphone 2.1.0.2

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#16

As someone else pointed out you can block web cam etc via Win 10. i installed this as at the time I didn't realise you could via Win 10. The pop up that enables you to stop the program from blocking stuff doesn't stay up long enough to select which option you want. My Steam client was blocked as was my screen capture program ( a paid for version of Ashampoo Snap), I had to deactivate the program to get my Steam client to open.

Although I like the idea, I've had to uninstall the program as it's too bothersome.

Reply   |   Comment by Whiterabbit-uk  –  5 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+2)

Whiterabbit-uk,

We apologize for any inconvenience.
Your phenomenon occurred because we blocked an unregistered program from using WebCam.

If you register "Steam Client" as an allowed program, this program allows to use WebCam for Steam.
The display time of the Pop-Up screen asking whether to block or not is increased more than the current time, and the user will have enough time to choose.

Thanks

Reply   |   Comment by xSecuritas  –  5 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+2)
#15

To clarify... If I install this, will I be able to allow other programs that xSecuritas does not have in their "safe" list? If a program is not on the "safe" list,and tries to use my web cam or mike, I will get a pop-up box asking me?

Is this also true for browsers, and more specifically for each individual Tab in a browser. (Chrome and IE)

Reply   |   Comment by rich  –  5 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+1)

rich,
Yes.
If a program that is not part of the Safe List attempts to use the WebCam, a pop-up window will ask if you want to allow or block the program.
You can of course change the permissions later.

We also always allow WebCams for IE, Chrome, Safari, Opera and FireFox.

Thanks

Reply   |   Comment by xSecuritas  –  5 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+1)

xSecuritas, I want to block my microphone in certain circumstances in Chrome. Is there a way to do that? On a tab basis?

Reply   |   Comment by rich  –  5 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (0)

rich,
Currently, we allow webcam and microphones for all browsers regardless of tab(url).

1. Control webcam by url (tab) - ie, edge, safari, firefox is possible. But for chrome and opera, I have to think about it. Because chrome has recently changed its url acquisition method.

2. Disable use of webcam/mike in the browser regardless of the tab (url), is possible with minor modifications.

***I think that your suggestion is nice.
Please give me some times.
I will check it again

Thank you.

*** support@xsecuritas.com

Reply   |   Comment by xSecuritas  –  5 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (0)
#14

It says it can block illegal hacks, how does it know what's illegal?

Can it also block legal hack, such as by a legal court order, and again, how does it know?
.

Reply   |   Comment by Peter Blaise  –  5 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+9)

From the description above: "If some programs access your WebCam or microphone, then you will first see a pop-up window asking you to confirm your approval. You only allow use of WebCam or Microphone for programs you trust."

BTW: The same function ist already included in Windows 10!

Reply   |   Comment by Julia  –  5 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+10)

Peter Blaise,

Well. It's a matter of using terms. Sorry.

Rather than telling to block malware, it is more appropriate to block unauthorized programs.

We block the use of the webcam in the following ways:

1. Allows WebCam-using programs to be installed when installing MS Windows.

2. We also allow many popular programs (Skype, Viber, etc.), which are allowed by policy, and you can disable them.

3. Therefore, it may seem that this program is not playing a role when using only the programs that we basically allow.

4. However, try removing Skype, Viber, etc. from the policy.
You can see that the webcam is blocked.

** When configuring the allowable program, you can register the process name or digital signature.

Reply   |   Comment by xSecuritas  –  5 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+6)
#13

Be very careful installing this program hard to uninstall and Thank you for your support xsecuritas can't even reply to a message on your website,anyway you are finely uninstall.

Reply   |   Comment by Denis  –  5 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+5)

Denis,
Programs provided by xSecuritas are not complicated uninstall.
However, only passwords are required to prevent other users from uninstalling the program.
When uninstalling the program, the following Option is available.
"Delete the data files when uninstalling the program" checkbox
  => If you select this, all the policy files (database), etc. will be deleted.

Reply   |   Comment by xSecuritas  –  5 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+4)
#12

TK-
Since you disable your webcam this program is obviously not for you. Just move on, please.
Regards

Reply   |   Comment by Dave  –  5 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-2)

Dave, Ahhh NO sorry, I'm not that selfish! I am just pointing out that this software provides a false sense of security. There are no 100% secure software only solutions everything is circumventable, even disabling in BIOS could hypothetically be reversed by ring0 control of the hardware registers set by the BIOS to disable the webcam. Filter drivers aka rootkit filters are not a panacea since the API normally used that the filter intercepts to enforce control is bypassable in exactly the same way that anti-malware programs detect malicious rootkits by comparing direct access with API access... if they are different there is a rootkit running. At which point the registry API can be bypassed and the devices drivers can be accessed directly bypassing the filter driver altogether. Or the malware could attack the rootkit filter and program to disable or remove it.

Reply   |   Comment by TK  –  5 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+6)

TK, I am grateful that TK has informed me of the wrong part of the program or the part to fix.
I also know that I can not completely block 100% malware, so I am wondering how to handle it. Rootkits and more ...

Reply   |   Comment by xSecuritas  –  5 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+5)
#11

Many have commented on how to block the camera from seeing anything you wish not to be seen (in my case, I wish nothing to be seen.) Is there a similar sticker way to block the speakers? So they can't be hacked but will let music come through.

Reply   |   Comment by Diana  –  5 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-1)
#10

Just use a small tab of black tape over your cam lens and turn off your mic sound settings.. lol now send me $50 bucks !

Reply   |   Comment by John  –  5 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+18)

John,

I'll do you one better. I trim a yellow sticky tab to just the sticky park, and park that over the cam. No gummy stuff to clean off the monitor frame/laptop, and reusable.

Reply   |   Comment by casperimproved  –  5 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+2)

Why would anyone do that? It leaves adhesive residue and can damage your lens.

Reply   |   Comment by bob  –  5 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+2)

I think tape on the camera lens might dirty the lens. A piece of paper folded several times and taped to the camera area does the trick for me and I can take it off if or when I want to use it in the future.

Reply   |   Comment by Therese S.  –  5 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+2)
#9

As an exhibitionist, I love to be watched, so anybody may hack my camera as they like. No need for this software :)

Reply   |   Comment by LoLiTa  –  5 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+5)

LoLiTa, What is your IP address?

Reply   |   Comment by Susan  –  5 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+2)

LoLiTa, I'm interested, how do I connect to you? :-)

Reply   |   Comment by Man  –  5 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+2)
#8

I found that many, if not all of chinese software you have installed in your computer, by law, they have full access to your camera and the mike via back door software not seen by any security software because they operate on already installed "friendly" access allowed patch.

Reply   |   Comment by Joe  –  5 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+6)

Joe,

Actually No [& it's *mic* BTW].

In fact, I'd think that if it was that easy & prevalent, then gov agencies like the NSA and companies like NSO Group Technologies wouldn't bother engineering their own stuff.

Reply   |   Comment by mike  –  5 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+1)
#7

Awhile back, someone hacked my webcam and then one day, they started shouting obscenities through the speaker. I don't know how many days, weeks, or months they had been watching. Or what they saw or what personal information they were able to hear. I highly recommend you take webcam security very seriously. I will be installing this.

Reply   |   Comment by Chuck  –  5 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-24)

Chuck, if you take it seriously you'd need more than this! start by disabling the interfaces you can in the BIOS or as a last resort in device manager and delete or NULL the driver files for the device manager disabled devices... or to be sure unplug the built in microphones and webcam device in the laptop lid...

Reply   |   Comment by TK  –  5 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+3)
#6

$50 for something (you don't know what it is actually doing) that will have full access to your camera and microphone? Just unplug you camera, it is free and 100% works.

Reply   |   Comment by Alexey  –  5 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+19)

Alexey, How do you unplug a camera that's builtin to your laptop? Would not simply turning on Airplane mode work as well as for the microphone?

Reply   |   Comment by laptoper  –  5 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+8)

laptoper, just go to device manager and disable camera. It is fast and easy.

Reply   |   Comment by Alexey  –  5 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+26)

Alexey, laptop camera or mike can easily masked with a small tape when not in use

Reply   |   Comment by Eddie  –  5 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+22)

Some computers have BIOS settings to disable as well.

Reply   |   Comment by Bryan  –  5 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+13)

laptoper, a tiny piece of electrical tape works wonders, 100% opaque, a dab of silicon caulk works as well (removable when dried up).

Reply   |   Comment by Joe  –  5 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+9)

Alexey,

If you can turn it off, malware can turn it on. Turning it off in Device Mgr. would probably work with some malware, but there's no guarantee it'll stop all malware.

Reply   |   Comment by mike  –  5 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+6)

Joe, hello namesake, just my 2 cents :-)
A piece of dark cloth put over the top of a laptops cover (and the camera) works just as well but sounds less risky, as glue from the electrical tape can leave a mess. Also, that silicon may not be that easy to remove if it gets inside the microphone's "hole". I'm not sure if it's possible to turn a camera on w/o illuminating the its light, but I believe disabling both the camera and microphone should suffice (the light coming on would be a warning?). I personally use a different arrangement (not for privacy reasons, just like a big screen and "regular" keyboard as much as privacy). Plug my laptop at home to an external monitor and keyboard. The laptop sits off the desk, so if someone hacks my camera, they will see the touchpad area....

Reply   |   Comment by JoeJ  –  5 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+1)

laptoper, just keep the volume control on your mike settings to 0 value and nobody can hear anything and on your camera, just set the brightness button to 0 or dark and nobody can see anything.

Reply   |   Comment by Sue  –  5 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+3)

laptoper, you either unplug the built in webcam and microphone assemblies yourself if you are a compitent computer repair technician, OR hire a compitent computer repair technician to do it for you. It's not rocket science and is 100% secure. Disabling within device manager is using the Device manager MMC addin to change registry settings that could have been done by other means like group policy editor or a 3rd party designed program that makes or even unmakes those changes... and 3rd party software *could* enumerate the imaging devices and look for a disabled webcam and re-enable it. What can be disabled in software by windows adminstration tools can be re-enabled by third parties with sufficent skillz. If I can think it you can be assured the NSA and other nation states cyber espionage teams can do it, and so could black hat criminal hackers if organised crime financed it.

Reply   |   Comment by TK  –  5 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+2)

mike, It can be made significantly more difficult for malware or anything to re-enable a device manager disabled device if you first trash the drivers .sys file in some way i.e. copy over an invalid driver file renamed to the proper drivers name so that windows cannot load the driver even if the device was re-enabled... then disable it.

Reply   |   Comment by TK  –  5 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (0)

laptoper, At my work we install webcams in laptops that don't have one (find spare USB inside, route the cable, drill a hole, etc.).
To unplug one is 100x times easier :P Just open the lid and pull the connector. As a little bonus you can also cut only the power and connect an external switch.

Reply   |   Comment by temp  –  5 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (0)
#5

On a PC why not just unplug the camera from the USB port until it is needed. We use the camera to talk with our children regularly, but that is all we use it for.

Reply   |   Comment by Stan  –  5 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+5)

Stan, Because modern computers come with webcam built into machine. they are not the separate thing like you have.

Reply   |   Comment by Robert  –  5 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+6)

Robert, i have yet to see a tower pc with built in camera ,mic granted many use laptops but many also use towers

Reply   |   Comment by walter  –  5 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+3)

walter, I have a Dell Inspiron all-in-one with a built-in camera and microphone.

Reply   |   Comment by Frank D  –  5 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+1)

.
[ Frank D ],

You can download the service manual and see how to open the computer and unplug the camera and microphone.

Then using any external microphone and camera that is completely controllable and easily unpluggable on demand when not in use will give you back control.
.

Reply   |   Comment by Peter Blaise  –  5 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+5)

Frank D, the plugs are internal and usually fairly accecesible... try searcing for a service manual for your machine and get adventurous or hire an engineer to open it up to disconnect the mic and camera and use USB webcam and external plugin mic if and when you want to use them. and unplug them when done.

Reply   |   Comment by TK  –  5 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+2)

TK, use an Edding for your built-in cam and a dummy microphone plug to disable the built-in microphone – voilà!

Reply   |   Comment by Julia  –  5 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-1)

Julia, sorry plugging in a dummy microphone only disables SOME soundchips internal mic inputs... On many one can choose either internal or external microphone using standard DirectSound API Only way to be CERTAIN is to physically unplug the internal devices, not having heard of an Edding google suggests it could be a perminant marker pen ... it is unlikely that simply drawing on the lense will completely obscure the view via the camera but it will ruin the cameras lens... whilst unplugging the camera does leave the lens and camera intact and undamaged if the device is sold in the future or one wanted to re-instate the camera at some point in the future.

Reply   |   Comment by TK  –  5 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (0)

Peter Blaise, Thank you. I didn't want to actually disconnect my webcam and microphone, I just wanted to let everyone know that there are desktops with built-i webcams and microphones. But thank you for your reply and information.

Reply   |   Comment by Frank D  –  5 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-2)

Robert, laptops may have a built-in webcam -- which you just put a piece of tape or you can purchase webcam "sliders" to enable/disable the camera. As well, in device manager camera/microphone can be disabled. "modern computers" (no such thing) does not come with a webcam UNLESS you add it as an "accessory" when purchasing a workstation. I do not even give Microsoft via Win10 PRO access to my camera/microphone, why would I give the access to this program? I cannot trust an overseas software company access to the media devices.

Reply   |   Comment by DEBUG  –  5 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (0)
#4

What if the malware stopped and disabled the filter driver service FAccReg.sys will the system deny access to both mics and camera devices by default i.e. fail SAFE or just cease filtering access and let windows resume APP access controls if it does offer any controls.

Reply   |   Comment by TK  –  5 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+5)

TK, The Filter Drive can not be stopped programmatically.
Also, to make it more secure, periodically check whether the filter is loaded, and if the filter is unloaded, it is better to apply the load method again.

Reply   |   Comment by xSecuritas  –  5 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+2)

xSecuritas, I seriously doubt the filter driver can be prevented from being stopped programatically... I don't mean can be asked to stop using service controls but can be forced to have its process thread ended. Also unless you register the driver with windows file protection and use trustedinstaller owner in the installation process it is a simple matter for an elevated process to rename your driver file and replace it with an empty file of the same name which obviously will never restart once the drivers service thread is ended... .sys driver files are not held open once instantiated so can be renamed, deleted even relaced with a different file altogether with the appropriate elevated rights... I could also devise a procedure to adjust the replacememt empty .sys file ACL to make it impossible for you to restore your original .SYS file... you best opetion would be to use a random file name on each instantiation... Or hash checking the file before instantiating it and replacing it with a different named driver file which then is instantiated if the previously named drivers file had been corrupted in some way. Also do you protect approved cam or sound card applications from having code injected into them from being hijacked by malware and getting access to the camera and microphones indirectly through the approved applications?

Reply   |   Comment by TK  –  5 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+6)

TK,

"you best opetion would be to use a random file name on each instantiation... Or hash checking the file before instantiating it and replacing it with a different named driver file which then is instantiated if the previously named drivers file had been corrupted in some way. "
=>
This drive is loaded at boot time. So I guess it would be difficult to change the name each boot time, but what if I use file filter to not rename, delete, or modify the drive file (sys)?. ih this case, I think that I can protect my sys file.

And for code injection problem, this part is not yet processed. It seems to be a security enhancement to prevent code injection soon.

Reply   |   Comment by xSecuritas  –  5 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (0)

TK, * If an unregistered application attempts to access to webcam or microphone, ask the user whether to allow the this operation.
* When the main program is terminated, all programs can not access the WebCam or microphone.

Reply   |   Comment by Peter van Rijswijk  –  5 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+4)

Peter van Rijswijk, and if the filter driver service and the main program are killed then all bets are off and full access is restored to all processes.

Reply   |   Comment by TK  –  5 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+4)
#3

Cannot find any actual user reviews about this software just sites for DL and ads. Did find this old discussion about the subject however... https://security.stackexchange.com/questions/47345/surveillance-blocking-laptops-microphone-from-spying-on-you

Apparently if you are using Win 10 there is a work around found here... https://www.windowscentral.com/how-disable-your-laptops-webcam-and-microphone

I never worried about the microphone and have covered up the webcam ever since I learned of the possible hack years ago.

Reply   |   Comment by LadyLei  –  5 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+26)
#2

Did a search for this company. It is not apparently related to the Swedish company Securitas which trades on the stock exchange. Appears to be registered in Canada last year. Am curious as to why to pick a name so close to such a well known company....just a fluke, trying to ride on other's coat tails or something fishy? Getting paranoid in my old age I guess. Still I wonder.

Reply   |   Comment by LadyLei  –  5 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+9)

LadyLei, Yes. Our company name is xSecuritas, which is different from the Securitas company in Sweden.
When I emphasized the meaning of security, I put an X as a prefix.

Reply   |   Comment by xSecuritas  –  5 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+2)

LadyLei, Yes there is no real world address for the offices of this company just a maildrop address in USA used by many (12) companies of no fixed abode, and the domains whois data is not that of a legitimate corporate entitiy but that of a private individual using a whois anonymizer service based in Canada.... and the software is based upon old fashioned rootkit filter drivers to perform the claimed actions which as most technicians know is just a band aid that can easily be circumvented by many techniques. In addition their "secure" website suports obsolete TLS 1.0 and so allows older now known to be not-secure browsers that only support TLS 1.0 to perform financial data transactions which should NOT be allowed. They should either move the checkout functionality to a different server enforcing a minimum of TLS1.2 https connection to procede or server side detect the TLS1.0 connection and refuse to offer the checkout page unless the visitor switches to a modern spec'd browser that does support TLS1.2 or better. The owners have been made aware of this security vulnerability in their servers architecture since previous giveaways but they have chosen to not impliment https minimum industry security requirements for secured web transactions.

Reply   |   Comment by TK  –  5 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+9)

TK, Thanks for that info. I don't get why someone wants to hide who they are if they are being straightforward with their business. Despite the developers explanation about the name, it still strikes me a pretty shady move. Could have just called it XSecurity and avoided the appearance of being part of a well known company.

Will not be trying this for three reasons: first I don't see a need for it on my machine, second just strikes me as a poor way to start a business and does not inspire trust for users and third, no real user reviews or trusted sites testing it.

Reply   |   Comment by LadyLei  –  5 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+3)
#1

Hi. everyone...

The 'Block Webcam and microphone' product allows only WebCam or Microphone to be used for the applications that are allowed.

This helps prevent malware, Ransomware, etc. from leaking your personal information using your your WebCam or Microphone.

In addition, if a malicious program attempts to use the WebCam, it immediately blocks it and logs it.


Related Videos

* Quick Guide: https://youtu.be/090U2Soy0Ks
* Tutorial: https://youtu.be/Rqt8efpyWZM
* See more videos: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCW9UHqHn07a5Tk_L2bmsXyw

If you have any questions, please let me know.
Thanks

support@xSecuritas.com

Reply   |   Comment by xSecuritas  –  5 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+14)

xSecuritas, I prefer to remove the webcam API communication chain completely by disabling the webcam in the BIOS settings that way there is no way to access the webcam hardware via ANY windows API or conventional driver... That way I don't have to rely on 3rd party software to maintain its controls in order to prevent undesired camera access. Only once in over 20 years of using the internet have I felt the need to use a webcam... so no need here to give any programs selective access to the built in webcam. If a program demands a camera to operate I just use a virtual camera that provides a static test card image to the windows camera API.

Reply   |   Comment by TK  –  5 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (-3)

TK, I agree to Disable the BIOS and Perfectly Block the WebCam.
However, in this application, I chose a way to block the WebCam or microphone to control the Registry access.

The reason is to use it when using a PC, some programs use WebCam, and others do not use WebCam.

Of course, if the malicious program does not refer to the Registry, WebCam Disable may not work.

Reply   |   Comment by xSecuritas  –  5 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+1)

xSecuritas, oh dear... so you don't filter the driver chain itself just selected device entries within the registry... I presume you do know that WIndows 10 does include access controls for APPs though I personally would never trust those or any controls presented to the end user knowing that MS likes to maintain closed source security through obscurity rather than real peer reviewed access controls and security measures.
Which also means if the service I mentioned which is your filter driver is stopped by software fault or attack then all protection would either cease or all registry read access would become blocked depending upon how the filter driver is inserted into the registry access chain.

Reply   |   Comment by TK  –  5 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+2)

TK, We do filter the driver and everything else for the registry.
On Windows 10, there is no other way,

Reply   |   Comment by xSecuritas  –  5 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (+3)

xSecuritas -- nice try but all of this can be handled w/o an "app", in fact its more secure if handled via BIOS, or OS or inside the offending application. I can disable all recording devices in device manager and even more secured via the BIOS. After what happened in the US 2016 elections, its now more than ever more important to NOT let any software on my workstation, as any software installed could be a potential for hacking/spying/tracking. So will not allow any foreign software on my workstation. I can write what I need myself.

Reply   |   Comment by DEBUG  –  5 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (0)

DEBUG,

Hi?
Thank you for your good advice.
The motives for making this application is as follows.
Of course, you can disable the WebCam through BIOS or Device Manager. However, my purpose is to make WEBCAM available only to application that is allowed by the user, and to block others.
Well. And in my application there is no BackDoor or malware at all.

Thank you for your feedback and I hope that everything is going well with you.

Reply   |   Comment by xSecuritas  –  5 months ago  –  Did you find this comment useful? yes | no (0)
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